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Columbus Dispatch

OSU officials to hold news conference today at 7 p.m. | B...

What an imbecile you are ...  (Mar 8, 2011 | post #90)

Columbus Dispatch

OSU officials to hold news conference today at 7 p.m. | B...

What an imbecile your are ...  (Mar 8, 2011 | post #88)

Orlando Sentinel

High five turns into bad call

Coach, I do agree, but I wouldn't call them exceptions, I would call them situations. In golf, where I am most qualified to discuss rules, there are just 34 rules, and they fit into a small pamphlet the size of your wallet. But there is a separate book, "The Decisions on the Rules of Golf," which contains more than 1,000 situational decisions. (The index alone is 93 pages.) The Decisions are are a collection of ruling made over many years, and they cover almost any conceivable situation that can pop up in a competition. (A sea gull picks up your ball and drops it into a lake? It's covered.) The rule in this softball situation, I assume, was written to prevent a teammate from helping a runner reach a base faster -- pushing them, pulling them, dragging them down the line, etc. But to take away any ambiguity, to make it less of a judgment call, the no-touching clause was added. I will concede to your knowledge of the rules in softball/baseball -- how many other situations deal with a runner circling the bases after a home run? As I pointed out in my original post, what is the rule if the hitter had missed a base while running around them? I'm going to guess that the opposing team would have an opportunity to appeal, and that that runner would be called out (assuming the umpires saw it and allowed the appeal). Would it be bad sportsmanship to make that appeal? I say no. But this case was botched by the umpires. The coach was more than justified to make the appeal -- heck, it's her job to make the appeal. The umpires should have known the rule, and the penalty of a warning for a first infraction. (I'm assuming that's the ruling, as discussed above.) By botching the ruling, the umpires set in motion the whole messy scenario. The Rochester team was the beneficiary of a horrible ruling, but not a "bad call." Coincidentally, there is a story in this week's Sports Illustrated (June 29) about a now-famous incident where the OPPOSITION players carried a girl around the bases after she was injured during her home-run trot. It quotes the umpire, Bill Wagner, telling the runner's teammates not to touch her, or she'll be called out. So the opposing team carried her around the bases!! In the high-five situation, after getting the bad ruling, and then finding out that the game should have been over, the Rochester coach could have forfeited the ensuing victory. That would have been great sportsmanship. But not doing it isn't necessarily bad sportsmanship. It all depends on the situation.  (Jun 26, 2009 | post #17)

Orlando Sentinel

High five turns into bad call

You're welcome to visit anytime. You never know, you just might learn something about how to do the day-to-day work of journalism. Coffee, sodas and water are free, too  (Jun 25, 2009 | post #15)

Orlando Sentinel

High five turns into bad call

For the anonymous poster who asked: 1) I played varsity golf and club hockey in high school, and club hockey in college. 2) I was an ice hockey referee, officiating at the junior, high school and collegiate levels. 3) I have attended three PGA/USGA four-day rules seminars, on my own dime, and have served as a rules official at several amateur tournaments. 4) I did go to journalism school, and I formerly worked on the sports copy desk at the Sentinel. I felt compelled to comment on this column, using my real name, for several reasons, not the least of which was the personal attack on a coach who was doing her job. When Billy Martin alerted the umpires to the pine tar on George Brett's bat, it was called gamesmanship and a great application of the rules. When this coach calls a rules violation to the attention of the umpires, she's vilified by a columnist who wasn't there, is gathering information from other writers who also weren't there, and who has never spoken to the coach to get her side of the story. On the four daily sports copy desk's that I've worked on, it's called a "lazy man's column." It should have never been published -- the old-school term is "spiked. " As for the wrong application of the rule, that is the umpire's fault, not the coach's. Officials make mistakes, and "sportsmanshi p" and "class" are measured by one's reaction to bad calls. I understand self-deprecating humor, George, but threatening an official -- with a dog, no less -- is criminal. You should have been arrested -- if I was officiating the game, I would have called the cops. And if I was your editor, I would have killed the column. I am using it, though. It's hanging on the wall in the Valencia Voice newsroom among other examples of how NOT to do your job as a journalist.  (Jun 25, 2009 | post #14)

Orlando Sentinel

High five turns into bad call

Your column today is laughable. Rule are rules, and coaches, managers and players who know them well can take advantage in certain situations. Flip your scenario around — what if the Central Lakes player had been using an illegal bat — a la George Brett — when she hit the “home run?” Would you have expected Coach Musgjerd to say, “Oh, that’s OK, she hit it over the fence, so they win.” What if the player had batted out of order? What if the player had missed a base during her home-run trot? What if a player who had already been removed from the game switched jerseys with her twin sister and batted again? What if the umpire had called the ball foul, even if it was clear to everyone that it was fair? What if an outfielder had flung her glove into the air and hit the ball — dead-ball, ground-rule triple (the last time I read the rules)? WHICH RULE DO YOU WANT TO ENFORCE IN WHICH SITUATION? How about Robin Ventura’s “Grand Slam Single?” http://en.wikipedi a.org/wiki/Grand_S lam_Single Like the situation in the women’s softball game, Ventura hit an apparent game-winning Grand Slam, but was mobbed by his teammates and never reached second base. Instead of the game ending 7-3, the umpires ruled that only the runner on third scored before the celebration, thus Ventura was credited with a single and the final score was 4-3. I bet if you were one of the bettors who had the “over” of 7-1/2 runs, you’d be screaming bloody murder!! (Like you are in this column today.) BUT RULES ARE RULES!! Go back through the annals of golf and find all of the situations where enforcement of a rule cost a player — Craig Stadler kneeling on a towel, in one famous instance — and not once will you find your argument of “simple reason” or sportsmanship being putforth by the player. There are times, however, when a coach should stand up for what is right, as opposed to what is in the rules. The famous “Fifth Down Game” is a classic example. Colorado beat Missouri on the last play of a 1990 football game — an extra play that should not have counted. http://en.wikipedi a.org/wiki/Fifth_D own_Game_(1990) The Colorado coach Bill McCartney — renowned more for his Christian beliefs than his coaching ability — accepted the victory. A moral man, a good coach, would have forfeited the game. Or how about U.S. synchronized swimmer Kristen Babb-Sprague (wife of former major-leaguer Ed Sprague), who accepted an Olympic gold medal in 1992 even though a mechanical scoring error deprived Canadian Sylvie Frechette? Babb-Sprague would still be making money as a motivational speaker if she had draped the gold medal over Frechette’s neck and taken the silver. That would have been sportsmanship! Instead Babb-Sprague, like her sport, is out there somewhere in obscurity with her tarnished “gold” medal. (Frechette was eventually awarded the gold that she truly earned 16 months later, but Babb-Sprague kept her fool’s gold.) http://en.wikipedi a.org/wiki/Kristen _Sprague Just like Florida State officials should stop all appeals in their cheating scandal and forfeit all of the victories involved. Why don’t you write a column calling Bobby Bowden the Wicked Witch of Tallahassee? (And anyone who would admit charging onto a field of play, WITH A DOG, to confront an official should never write about sports again!)  (Jun 25, 2009 | post #7)

Orlando Sentinel

UF arrests no minor issue

239 football players? Seriously? That's the only shocking fact in this story.  (Jun 5, 2009 | post #1)

Orlando Sentinel

University of Central Florida second baseman Shane Brown ...

I mean, if someone grounds into four fielders' choice plays, their line is 0-for-4 and their on-base percentage is .000. They never reached base "safely. " I tried hard to find the record sequence for CSU-Northridge's Shaun Larkin -- including calling the school media relations staff -- but the best I could find was Larkin's performance in a three-game series against Washington State in February 2002. He had six hits and 10 bases on balls in 16 plate appearances, so he must have had two more safe reaches in a game before, or after, or both.  (Apr 27, 2009 | post #2)

Orlando Sentinel

T.K. Wetherell to announce Florida State's appeal of NCAA...

It's easy -- everyone involved should be fired or expelled. Those who cheated, and those responsible for the actions of those who cheated. Clean, quick.  (Apr 27, 2009 | post #22)

Orlando Sentinel

University of Central Florida second baseman Shane Brown ...

Since when does hitting into a fielders' choice count as reaching base? It counts as a plate appearance but not a base when calculating on-base percentage. His accomplishment is certainly noteworthy, but the "streak" ended when he went 2-for-3 Saturday.  (Apr 27, 2009 | post #1)

Orlando Sentinel

T.K. Wetherell to announce Florida State's appeal of NCAA...

If ONE player cheated, they all should pay! I can't believe the FSU apologists who think "only" 25 cheaters is a good thing! (Full disclosure: I don't support any college football team, in Florida or anywhere else. My alma mater, Cleveland State, doesn't even have a team -- but will knock off Wake Forest in basketball Friday.)  (Mar 17, 2009 | post #17)

Orlando Sentinel

T.K. Wetherell to announce Florida State's appeal of NCAA...

Wetherell and Bowden needed to be fired the day the scandal became public. They should both be fired now. Instead, the state will spend more money on an appeal. (Full disclosure: I'm an equal opportunity ignorer of all college football programs in Florida.)  (Mar 17, 2009 | post #16)

Orlando Sentinel

Tampa Bay Rays turnaround would be greatest sports story ...

The column says worst team in the sport, not league or division. In 1990, three MLB teams were worse than the Twins (74-88) -- the Braves (65-97), the Cardinals (70-92) and the Yankees (67-95).  (Oct 29, 2008 | post #20)

Orlando Sentinel

Dwight Howard buys $8M house in Seminole County

The house was open to the public during the Street of Dreams event. No secrets, other than how is he going to get his 12+ cars into a four-car garage?  (Oct 29, 2008 | post #97)

Orlando Sentinel

Let's raise taxes. No, really. I mean it. You'll like it....

No, it's a question asked by a realist who is not afraid to hide behind a fake name on the Internet. I'll ask it again -- how do we solve civic problems (crime, infrastructure, schools, etc., etc.) without throwing money at them?  (Oct 22, 2008 | post #77)

Q & A with Ken Carpenter

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