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Gordon Lightfoot

Gordon Lightfoot in Atlantic Canada !

Gordon Lightfoot takes Moncton Coliseum stage ! Published Friday April 2nd, 2010 Latest tour by iconic Canadian singer lands in Moncton tomorrow night By BRETT ANNINGSON Times & Transcript Staff Gordon Lightfoot was rumoured to have died last February. Arnie Lee/Times & Transcript Gordon Lightfoot Showing the dangerous side of social media, rumours of his death originated on Twitter and then spread to Facebook and became viral from there. Lightfoot was travelling to work in his car when he heard news of his death on the radio. He immediately phoned the station to set the record straight. At 71, Lightfoot is alive, well and on the road for his latest tour of Canada, bringing his signature folk music to the stage. His show lands at the Moncton Coliseum tomorrow night. After health troubles in 2002 which forced him to cancel part of his tour, Lightfoot bounced back two years later to release 'Harmony,'his 20th studio album. The next year he was inducted into the Canadian Music Industry Hall of Fame and launched a 30-city tour. Then in 2006 he suffered a transient stroke on stage and could not feel his fingers enough to play the guitar. He continued the tour a few days later. Lightfoot took the stage for a recent concert in Toronto and, 10 minutes into a set, looked out at the audience and quoted Mark Twain, saying, "Reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated." Something for which his fans are eternally grateful. Lightfoot really came into his own as a folk and country singer in the 1960s; but his most loved hits began to top the charts in the 70s with classics like 'If You Could Read My Mind,' 'Sundown,' 'Carefree Highway,' and of course 'The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.' The list of artists who have recorded their own versions of Lightfoot's songs is astounding; people like Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Marty Robbins, Jerry Lee Lewis, Bob Dylan, Barbra Streisand, Johnny Mathis, Harry Belafonte, and even Sarah McLachlan and John Mellencamp. He was born in Orillia, the son of a manager for a dry cleaning firm, and really got his start singing in the church choir of the St. Paul's United Church in Orillia. He later found himself performing on local radio, and in local operettas and music festivals. Lightfoot taught himself guitar in high school and then headed off for the fame and fortune of California. He studied jazz composition and orchestration for two years at Hollywood's Westlake College of Music, at the same time making money by writing and arranging commercial jingles. In 1960 he returned to Canada and began to perform with The Swinging Eight, a group featured on TV's Country Hoedown. By 1962 he earned a following in and around Toronto and decided to release two singles, which were played a lot in the city, and a little bit in the rest of the country. In 1965, Lightfoot signed a management contract with Albert Grossman, who also represented Bob Dylan. That same year, he signed a recording contract with United Artists and released his own version of "I'm Not Saying" as a single. However, in 1970 he changed record labels and it was under Warner Brothers' Reprise that he had his first major hit with "If You Could Read My Mind." The rest, as they say, is history. By the 1990s he was mostly touring, giving just 50 concerts a year by 1998, mainly in North America, while he released two albums in the period. Lightfoot has won 15 Juno Awards and been nominated for 5 Grammy Awards. He was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame in 1986 and the Canadian Country Music Hall Of Fame in 2001. In May 2003, he was made a Companion of the Order of Canada and is also a member of the Order of Ontario. In 2004 was inducted into the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame. Singer Robbie Robertson calls him a "national treasure."  (Apr 2, 2010 | post #1)

Gordon Lightfoot

Red Shea, 70

I was really sad to hear about this. Red Shea was a great guitarist. He will never be forgotten, especially while listening to the early Gordon Lightfoot Albums. He had magical fingers on that guitar... What a great sound they had... ~Jesse Joe~  (Jun 13, 2008 | post #1)

Gordon Lightfoot

Gordon Lightfoot on The Hour !

The name of The Hour's host is actually spelled, {George Stroumboulopoulos.}  (Apr 25, 2008 | post #2)

Gordon Lightfoot

Gordon Lightfoot on The Hour !

Gord will be interviewed on CBC-TV's The Hour on May 6th at 11:00pm. With host George Stomboloupous. This will be a great one to watch.  (Apr 25, 2008 | post #1)

Gordon Lightfoot

BARRY HARVEY / Gordon Lightfoot's manager dies.

Hi Len Jaffe very interesting to know that you have sold to Gordon one of his 12 string Gibson b-45. If your not already a member, I invite you to join Corfid. It's a discussion board on this great Poet Genius. There you can share your Lightfoot stories with many Lightfoot devotees. Go to: www.corfid.com and select a name can be your own. Then start posting. Hope to see you there. Later, Jesse Joe  (Jan 13, 2008 | post #5)

Gordon Lightfoot

BARRY HARVEY / Gordon Lightfoot's manager dies.

Hi Len Jaffey very interesting to know that you sold one of Gordon's 12 string Gibson b-45. I invite you to join Corfid. It's a discussion board on this great Poet Genius Gordon Lightfoot. There you can share your Lightfoot stories with many Lightfoot devotees. Go to: www.corfid.com and select a name can be your own. Then start posting. Hope to see you there. Later, Jesse Joe  (Jan 13, 2008 | post #4)

Gordon Lightfoot

BARRY HARVEY / Gordon Lightfoot's manager dies.

Just a few words. Im still having difficuty believing this. I can still see him, this past May 11th, pacing the floor at The Moncton Coliseum. Checking the large crowd on a hot friday evening. After the concert I got a huge handshake, from Mr. Harvey and got to meet the poet who I imagined to be a bit taller. I talked twice on the phone with Barry Harvey. He made me laugh, and I made him laugh as well. I remember telling him I can't beleive Im actually talking with Gordon Lightfoot's manager. We talked a bit more, and I remember telling him at the end of the conversation, that Gordon was, 'no big ego show off.' And he said," that's why people love him so much." I agreed. The second time, he returned my call. When I saw the Toronto telephone number on my caller ID, I thought this can't be. Thinking it was probably a secretary at EMP returning a message from Mr. Harvey. So being a little nervous, I answered, Hello, on the other end, "Hi this is Barry Harvey from the Gordon Lightfoot office." I knew right then that my idol, Gordon Lightfoot had some friendly down to earth people working for him. I wont get into what the telephone conversation was about. But he had received the CD that I convince a friend of mine, who is a good singer songwriter from NB to send to EMP/ Barry Harvey. He told me, I listened to it and I like it, and sort of pointed him in the direction to what to do next. When I told him that he was however not nominated for an East Coast Music Award, for that CD. I remember very well his reply which was in a friendly tone, "Ah what do they know anyway." (Laughing) We both had a good laugh... So in ending this, it makes me think, we all have to go one day, and I hope the day never comes that Gordon Lightfoot goes before me...because, I cant imaging a world without Canada's greatest gift. "The Poet Genius"... ~gl~ I will never forget, Barry Harvey... A Lighthead always, ~ Jesse Joe ~  (Dec 8, 2007 | post #1)

Gordon Lightfoot

11/17/07 HAPPY 69th BIRTHDAY GORDON LIGHTFOOT !!!

It is actually 69 that he will be and not 68 as I previously posted. All in all have a wonderful day Gordon... ~Jesse Joe~  (Nov 16, 2007 | post #1)

Gordon Lightfoot

Saturday / 11/17 /07 ! Happy 68th birthday Gordon Lightfo...

That should have read HAPPY {69th} Gordon Lightfoot.  (Nov 15, 2007 | post #2)

Gordon Lightfoot

Saturday / 11/17 /07 ! Happy 68th birthday Gordon Lightfo...

Happy Birthday to a great Poet,Singer,Songwr iter. Gordon Lightfoot, your the best !! ~Jesse Joe~  (Nov 14, 2007 | post #1)

Gordon Lightfoot

1968 Gordon Lightfoot Concert Filmore West, San- Francisc...

1968 Concert Now on Wolfgang's Vault! ------------------ ------------------ ------------------ ------------------ -------- http://concerts.wo lfgangsvault.com/C ...px?id=579|2693 Gordon Lightfoot Fillmore West San Francisco, CA 10/05/1968 Gordon Lightfoot - 12 & 6 string guitar, vocals Red Shea - guitar John Stockfish - bass This 1968 Fillmore West performance captures Gordon Lightfoot opening a show that also featured Cold Blood and Canned Heat. Although a relative newcomer to American audiences at the time, Lightfoot was already 30 years old and a seasoned songwriter and singer, well respected in his home country, and fairly well known within the folk community. Distinctly Canadian, Lightfoot already had an impressive body of work that covered a wide range of territory, from slow romantic ballads to traditional folk, all delivered in his robust baritone voice. Accompanied on this performance by cohorts Red Shea on guitar and John Stockfish on bass, Lightfoot delivers a consistently captivating hour of material, consisting of choice tracks from his 1965 debut album, the 1967 follow-up, The Way I Feel and both his 1968 albums, the second of which had yet to be released at the time. The earliest material featured here, "I'm Not Saying," "Steel Rail Blues," and the often covered "Early Morning Rain," were featured on his 1965 debut. All three hold up well and display a timeless quality that would remain an essential quality in much of his future writing. The fuller sound that he began exploring on his 1967 album, The Way I Feel is well represented by the likes of the lilting romantic ballad, "Softly, " "Walls," "Rosanna, " and the set-closing epic, "Canadian Railroad Trilogy." On the latter, Lightfoot's magnificent lyrics capture the endless expanse and textures of Canada as well as anything ever written. Like many songwriters of the era, Lightfoot followed Dylan's path toward Nashville in 1968. He began working with producer John Simon (the Band) and utilized some of the same Nashville musicians that Dylan had employed during the Blonde On Blonde sessions. Although the results were somewhat erratic, Lightfoot's songwriting remained consistently strong. Many of those newer songs are performed here, with sparser accompaniment. "Black Day In July," written in response to the 1967 riots in Detroit, is even more chilling than its studio counterpart and he even performs his unusually baroque orchestral pop song, "Pussywillows , Cat-Tails," here stripped down to its bare essentials. His fourth album, Back Here On Earth was still a month away from being released, but a good sampling of its content is here, including "If I Could," "Cold Hands From New York," "Long Thin Dawn," "Unsettled Ways," and the finely crafted "Affair On 8th Avenue." It's not surprising that all remain close to the acoustic countrified approach of the studio versions, having just been recorded. The one total surprise here is "The Auctioneer," a song that wouldn't surface until 12 years later on Lightfoot's 1980 release, Dream Street Rose, Lightfoot was still a few years away from real stardom outside of Canada, but his songwriting craft and distinctive voice was easily as appealing as his more recognized later work. These songs reflect many of the same themes that he would return to throughout his career. Lightfoot would continue to gain recognition for his writing, with the likes of Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Harry Belafonte, Judy Collins, Marty Robbins and even Elvis Presley covering his songs, but few could improve on Lightfoot's own delivery. Listening to this early live set exemplifies the fact that although he deals with universal themes, Lightfoot and his songs remain the living, breathing embodiment of Canada. Re: 1968 Concert Now on Wolfgang's Vault!  (Nov 9, 2007 | post #1)

Gordon Lightfoot

Lovin Lightfoot !

http://thechronicl eherald.ca/Search/ 835129.html Lovin’ Lightfoot Audience appreciative of appearance by Canadian folk music icon There was a time in this fair land when the prospect of another Gordon Lightfoot concert didn’t look good. The legendary singer-songwriter suffered a serious abdominal hemorrhage in his hometown of Orillia, Ont., in the fall of 2002. Coincidentally, he had been booked to perform soon after the incident in the Maritimes. Saturday night at the Metro Centre provided an opportunity for Lightfoot to apologize for being a little late for his Halifax engagement. The gesture, which certainly wasn’t necessary, was noted appreciatively by the crowd that filled the arena’s lower bowl and floor set-up for the concert. Does it have to be pointed out that there were no hard feelings? Lightfoot, 68, has a huge reservoir of good will he can draw on. The first of two, 55-minute halves kicked off with popular favourite Cotton Jenny. Lightfoot didn’t say whether this was a conscious nod to being in Nova Scotia — Anne Murray had a big hit with the song — but the familiarity of the tune won over the crowd right off the bat. Lightfoot’s voice certainly has picked up some creases in recent years. The higher register is noticeably thin, which is something that crops up more in his 1960s material. But all singers popular enough to still draw audiences in the third and fourth decades of their careers have run into this. Surely Elton John wishes that his 1970s chestnuts didn’t soar to the heavens. Lightfoot, who strode purposefully to the front of the stage after his four band-mates assumed their positions, may have started a little slowly but he picked up steam in no time. By the time he got to the loping classic Sundown, which featured a wickedly tasteful electric guitar seminar by Terry Clements, he was fully engaged. Coffee house staple Ribbon of Darkness and narrative epic The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald, arguably one of the unlikeliest hit songs ever, were other highlights of the first set. Lightfoot returned after the 20-minute break with a set slightly heavier on his Sixties classics. If they were more challenging, he proved up to the task. The lean Lightfoot may have reached the evening’s peak with his version of If You Could Read my Mind. The song is typical of his best material from those early years, combining carefully crafted poetry in the lyrics with the thoughtful intricacy of the melody. Was it the Lightfoot of old in the spotlight on this night? It was the Lightfoot of experience, and he nailed every nuance. It reinforced the notion that if Lightfoot’s career had been limited to the four albums he released between 1965 and 1968, it would still be legendary. He appeared to really be in his comfort zone when he headed directly into the relaxed stride of Baby Step Back, which had a groove his voice could comfortably settle into. Early Mornin’ Rain was another treat for the memory from late in the concert, but many fans who insisted on shouting requests might have left disappointed. Lightfoot wasn’t always known as the cuddliest of public figures, but he addressed the crowd directly several times. If anybody had a right to know, he pointed out that Saturday was International Nurses Day. He remembered fondly playing the Privateer in Halifax practically a lifetime ago, and didn’t seem too bothered about recalling the partying, either. At one point, he mentioned that there was a time when he thought he might never get to the Maritimes again. "But here we are," he said. Lightfoot and his band still have a little more time to spend in Nova Scotia. Tonight, they’ll be at the Membertou Trade and Convention Centre in Sydney. After that, there are about 30 shows lined up in the United States through the summer.  (May 13, 2007 | post #1)