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San Francisco, CA

Bay Area American Indian does Alaska diabetes swim

I think the photo caption was partly deleted. Below is the original caption before it was shorted to accompany the photo: Zolina Zizi, a Richmond, CA resident,  swimmin g a relay leg of the August 4th Pennock Island Challenge (8.2 miles in mid 50s to low 60s temperature), held in Ketchikan, Alaska.  Zizi, an American Indian (Cheyenne/Arikara Creek), was on the Ketchikan Indian Community relay team that placed third in the fundraiser for the American Diabetes Association. Zizi was the only team member with open water swimming experience. She represented PATHSTAR (www.pathstar.org) a San Francisco-based nonprofit, that works with American Indian/Alaska Native communities to inspire healthy nutrition and active lifestyle practices. The annual 2013 PATHSTAR Alcatraz Swim Week will be held October 6 to 14th. Photo Credit: Ruth Pechay/Ketchikan Indian Community Health Clinic, Alaska    (Aug 11, 2013 | post #1)

San Jose, CA

4,900 + Books Donated to South Bay Needy Kids

Over 10,000 Holiday Book Donation to San Francisco Bay Area Organizations Serving Needy Families 4,900+ Books to South Bay Children LOS ALTOS, CA – Hoopoe Books Share Literacy Program (www.shareliteracy .org), which this year distributed 23,240 books to help over 16,500 underserved San Francisco/Bay Area children learn reading and thinking skills, has received a $90,000 grant from the Kaiser Permanente Community Grants Program. Just in time for the holidays, the grant will help spread cheer to children with the donation of over 10,000 Hoopoe books to charitable organizations and schools serving needy families. The books (some bi-lingual English-Spanish) are earmarked for holiday gift/toy programs. An additional 7,500 books have been requested for give-away programs in early 2009. South Bay organizations receiving over 4,900 books include: The Ecumenical Hunger Program, East Palo Alto; East Palo Alto Kids Foundation; Family Supportive Housing, Georgia Travis Center (Innvision) and Community Homeless Alliance Ministry (CHAM) in San Jose; Support Network for Battered Women, Sunnyvale; Catholic Charities’ Community Organizing Resources to Advance Learning (CORAL) and the Juvenile Dependency Court System in Santa Clara County; and Child Advocates in Milpitas. A nationwide program first introduced in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2006, Share Literacy partners with early education agencies serving poverty level and low-income families, after-school programs and organizations providing ESL and adult literacy instruction. "Many of the children in our program are in great need," said Share Literacy Director Sally Mallam. "It is particularly gratifying to help these children this holiday season, and even more so during the current economic situation that is affecting everyone. This is the fourth consecutive year that Kaiser Permanente has funded the Share Literacy Program and we are most appreciative of their generous, continued support," she said. Share Literacy requires additional funding to help an increasing number of agencies suffering cutbacks due to the current economic climate. So far 23 organizations have requested a Share Literacy Program of books and curricula. Administered by volunteers, there is an ongoing need for individual and corporate donors to cover the print and shipping costs of the books and classroom materials. Tax deductible donations can be made via www.shareliteracy. org. Hoopoe Books Share Literacy Program is based on a rich tradition of storytelling from Afghanistan, Central Asia and the Middle East. The program provides books and curricula for preK-Grade 8 classrooms aligned to National and California State Standards, and developed around Hoopoe Books Teaching-Stories (www.hoopoekids.co m). Teaching-Stories, the name given to this literary genre, were almost unknown in Western cultures. Today, educators and psychologists recognize these stories’ unique ability to develop high-level thinking in both children and adults. While entertaining for children, the stories also help them to see things in new ways – they foster perception, intuition and self-confidence.  (Dec 23, 2008 | post #1)

Oakland, CA

3,000 Books Donated to Needy East Bay Kids

Share Literacy Program Receives $90,000 from Kaiser Permanente 3,000 Holiday Book Donation to East Bay Organizations Serving Needy Families LOS ALTOS, CA – Hoopoe Books Share Literacy Program (www.shareliteracy .org), which this year distributed 23,240 books to help over 16,500 underserved Bay Area children learn reading and thinking skills, has received a $90,000 grant from the Kaiser Permanente Community Grants Program. Just in time for the holidays, the grant will help spread cheer to children with the donation of over 10,000 Hoopoe books to charitable organizations and schools serving needy families. The books (some bi-lingual English-Spanish) are earmarked for holiday gift/toy programs. An additional 7,500 books have been requested for give-away programs in early 2009. The Children’s Book Project/East Bay distributed 3,000 books to organizations including: the Oakland Housing Authority, Oakland Library (Second Start Program); Clinica de la Raza (affiliated with Reach Out and Read). East Oakland; Berkeley Library, Berkeley Reads, All or None of Us (a project of Legal Services for Prisoners with Children), Richmond chapter; and schools in the unified school districts of Oakland, Hayward, San Lorenzo, Alameda, San Pablo and Union City. A nationwide program first introduced in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2006, Share Literacy partners with early education agencies serving poverty level and low-income families, after-school programs and organizations providing ESL and adult literacy instruction. "Many of the children in our program are in great need," said Share Literacy Director Sally Mallam. "It is particularly gratifying to help these children this holiday season, and even more so during the current economic situation that is affecting everyone. This is the fourth consecutive year that Kaiser Permanente has funded the Share Literacy Program and we are most appreciative of their generous, continued support," she said. Share Literacy requires additional funding to help an increasing number of agencies suffering cutbacks. So far 23 organizations have requested a Share Literacy Program of books and curricula. Administered by volunteers, there is an ongoing need for individual and corporate donors to cover the print and shipping costs of the books and classroom materials. Tax deductible donations can be made via www.shareliteracy. org. ### Hoopoe Books Share Literacy Program is based on a rich tradition of storytelling from Afghanistan, Central Asia and the Middle East. The program provides books and curricula for preK-Grade 8 classrooms aligned to National and California State Standards, and developed around Hoopoe Books Teaching-Stories (www.hoopoekids.co m)  (Dec 23, 2008 | post #1)

San Francisco, CA

10,000+ Books to Needy San Francisco Area Children

Over 10,000 Holiday Book Donation to San Francisco Bay Area Organizations Serving Needy Families LOS ALTOS, CA – Hoopoe Books Share Literacy Program (www.shareliteracy .org), which this year distributed 23,240 books to help over 16,500 underserved San Francisco/Bay Area children learn reading and thinking skills, has received a $90,000 grant from the Kaiser Permanente Community Grants Program. Just in time for the holidays, the grant will help spread cheer to children with the donation of over 10,000 Hoopoe books to charitable organizations and schools serving needy families. The books (some bi-lingual English-Spanish) are earmarked for holiday gift/toy programs. An additional 7,500 books have been requested for give-away programs in early 2009. Over 2,200 books were donated to San Francisco organizations. East Bay groups received 3,000 books and over 4,900 went to organizations in the South Bay. A nationwide program first introduced in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2006, Share Literacy partners with early education agencies serving poverty level and low-income families, after-school programs and organizations providing ESL and adult literacy instruction. Share Literacy requires additional funding to help an increasing number of agencies suffering cutbacks due to the current economic climate. So far 23 organizations have requested a Share Literacy Program of books and curricula. Administered by volunteers, there is an ongoing need for individual and corporate donors to cover the print and shipping costs of the books and classroom materials. Tax deductible donations can be made via www.shareliteracy. org. Hoopoe Books Share Literacy Program is based on a rich tradition of storytelling from Afghanistan, Central Asia and the Middle East. The program provides books and curricula for preK-Grade 8 classrooms aligned to National and California State Standards, and developed around Hoopoe Books Teaching-Stories (www.hoopoekids.co m). Teaching-Stories, the name given to this literary genre, were almost unknown in Western cultures. Today, educators and psychologists recognize these stories’ unique ability to develop high-level thinking in both children and adults. While entertaining for children, the stories also help them to see things in new ways – they foster perception, intuition and self-confidence.  (Dec 23, 2008 | post #1)

San Francisco, CA

Sixth Grade Author-Activist Donates Books to Needy Bay Ar...

Twelve-year-old San Francisco author and activist Stefan Lyon’s mission to help improve the lives of the disadvantaged began at age 3 on the hard-scrabble, inner city streets of the city. Accompanied by his mom, Stefan handed out cookies and blankets every month to the homeless from his little red wagon. (Stefan and his mom continue this work today.) Stefan, a sixth grader, has funded the construction of two schools in Kenya with $45,000 raised through the sale of two books he wrote. He recently donated 400 copies of his books about his pet rats, "My Adventures with Stitch" and "Stitch and Molly Visit San Francisco," to The Children’s Book Project in Oakland (www.childrensbook project.org), which serves underprivileged Bay Area children. During his visit, Stefan told the children how the $45,000 provided funding for the Kenyan schools and why many African children are not able to attend school. Stefan’s first two-room schoolhouse named Stefan’s Wing was converted from an abandoned cow shed. His second school (grade 1-8) has opened for first and second graders and will be completed this year. Ask Stefan why he helps the disadvantaged and he’ll give you a simple, direct answer: "It’s good to help people who are less fortunate because we have so much and they have hardly anything." Stefan recently hosted an interactive videoconference with school kids across the country to heighten awareness of the plight of African children, raise funds for his schools and share ideas with other kids how they can help make a difference in the world. The conference was made possible through the funding and technology of Polycom, Inc. Stefan and the students continue to exchange ideas via e-mail. For further information about Stefan and his books, visit www.stefanlyon.com ###  (Jul 2, 2008 | post #1)