Send a Message
to IdeasandTruth

Comments

31

Joined

Mar 22, 2014

IdeasandTruth Profile

Forums Owned

Recent Posts

NCAA Basketball

James Daye Follows the Seeds of Money in the NCAA Tournament

Edited from article first published on Facebook under the title, "The Seeds of Money" Every year fans complain about some team that got snubbed by the NCAA selection committee when it seemed obvious that it should be included. At least it seemed obvious to those who know basketball or those who examine the RPI. If the fans really want to understand why this happens, maybe they're asking the wrong questions. To get the answer, they'll have to stop looking at the game, the coach, the team, and the RPI and follow the seeds of money. Above all, the NCAA is a moneymaking entity and their tournament seeds and pairings are constructed to yield the greatest amount of revenue possible. Of course it's confusing to us when we see the bracket, because asking a fundraiser or administrator to select the best 68 basketball teams is like asking a businessman to perform a major surgery. The process, which is never fully divulged, favors matchups that will yield maximum revenue for the NCAA. All tournament games would probably sell out regardless of the participants because of our nation’s love for college basketball, but because the NCAA is unwilling to risk a less than full arena, teams like Monmouth, St. Mary’s and St. Bonaventure get left out. After the committee completes the field, it uses the same process to rank the teams in “true seeds.” “True seeds” rank the field using a relative qualitative assessment of the field in descending order. This order is used to assess the competitive balance of the teams across the four regions of the tournament. A team can be moved after it's voted into the seed list with a simple vote. This process is called “scrubbing” by the NCAA. The public on the other hand may view it as “snubbing,” especially for the teams that don’t make the bracket. Making money in tournaments requires teams having a large fan base that travels. Syracuse, Vanderbilt and Tulsa fit that criterion for the NCAA selection committee so they are more likely to get votes than teams like St. Bonaventure, St. Mary's or Monmouth. Critics might make a legitimate case for inclusion of Syracuse, but the Orangemen lost five of its last six games and lost to five of the 7 top 25 teams played. Although Vanderbilt finished 11 - 7 in the SEC, the Commodores lost seven out of ten after starting 5 - 0. Like Syracuse, Vanderbilt notched two top 25 wins, but lost six. Unlike Syracuse and Vanderbilt, Tulsa didn’t notch a top 25 win. The Golden Hurricanes were 10 - 11 against the RPI’s top 200 and lost by 22 points in the American Athletic Conference. Watching the 6 non-power conferences comply with the NCAA’s system and still not get justice from the NCAA Selection Committee is heart breaking. Monmouth beefed up its non-conference schedule by playing the big programs on the road. Knocking off #17 Notre Dame, UCLA, USC, Georgetown and Rutgers didn’t impress the committee enough to give them an AL bid after they lost by 3 in the MAAC Conference Tournament. If that’s not enough, winning 12 of your last 14 is tough at any level. St. Mary’s finished on the same note. The Gaels won 8 of its last nine. St. Bonaventure has an RPI of 29 and a KenPom.com ranking of 78. Both were left out. St. Bonaventure, St. Mary’s, and Monmouth can’t ensure a large fan following to tournament games; hence, like small market teams each year, they had a great season but are relegated to the NIT Tournament. A convoluted selection process offers inherent protection to a committee whose primary mission may be to increase the NCAA’s bankroll. Having more former college or pro, retired coaches on the committee would make the process more respectful and equitable. The experience these members could bring might give the non-power 6 teams a chance if they fall short of winning their conference tournament. In the meantime, don't ask why a great basketball team wasn't chosen for the NCAA Tournament, ask whether the best possible matchups were ever the goal.  (Mar 15, 2016 | post #1)

North Carolina Tar Heels NCAA Basketball

NCSU vs UNC from the Coach's Perspective by James Daye

The NCSU game was the first I've seen in person this year. Watching a player or a game in person gives an observer the true speed to dissect the action. I understand some of our struggles now. As I AM AND ALWAYS WILL BE A TAR HEEL, there are some glaring truths about this team which equates to their struggles. The most obvious issue is our lack of perimeter threats other than Marcus Paige. Marcus needs help in a bad way. As a point guard who still plays in competitive 40 - 50 age Master's Basketball Tournaments, it's difficult to score when your opponent is in your jock and he has help when you think you have an open look. We are shooting 32% from three point range (124/378). Paige has 65 of our 124 3-pointers made. When the best 3-point shooter you have is a guy who recently switched from a south paw to a righty, your team may struggle. Nate Britt has made 22 of his 58 attempts (37.9%) but doesn't play with the confidence of a scorer. NCSU exploited us by being physical inside. State intimidated and dominated us on the boards. With Coach Smith, we worked on one on one, four on four or 5 on 5 box out drills everyday. This team doesn't attempt to put a body on anyone. The players believe their athletic ability will be enough to rebound proficiently but the NCSU game was evidence that that theory is fallible. What happened to the "jack knife" box out concept? One thing coach Smith and John Calipari taught me about coaching is when you don't have the talent, you must find other ways to score easy buckets. We got back in the NCSU game by increasing the tempo. We forced bad passes, quick shots and ill advised penetration, which yielded easy points in transition for us. We must play in transition because we don't have the shooters to carry us when our bigs, or Paige, are getting doubled. Let's GO HEELS! We have to get back to the basics and realize why we get everyone's best shot. We aren't good every year; we've been great forever! Follow me on Twitter @exheel4  (Feb 28, 2015 | post #1)

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

James Daye Remembers Coach Smith and The Power of Positiv...

After starting the 1985-86 basketball season 17-0, the Tar Heel basketball team moved to the Dean E. Smith Center to face archrival Duke. We defeated Duke that Saturday and quickly boarded a flight to Marquette for a Sunday afternoon game. Coach Smith despised back-to-back games because of the academic and physical detriment to the players. The lesson I learned about the power of positive thinking at Marquette shaped my coaching career.   Coach Smith and Bobby Knight vehemently protested against back to back games, 9 p.m. games or later and the lack of "meal money" for players. Nonetheless, the NCAA benefited financially from network scheduling, hence our trip to Marquette.  Rick Majerus had the Marquette fans so fired up they were heating up coins with cigarettes lighters and tossing them at our bench. In spite of our number 1 ranking, Marquette shot a blistering 68% from the field well into the final minutes of the game while holding us to meager 38%. With 4:11 to go Coach Smith called a timeout with us down 53-62. As we huddled, arm in arm in Tar Heel unity, I heard a phrase which has resonated in my brain since that day. Coach kneeled down and said, "We are right where we want to be!" I looked at Curtis Hunter and said, "I'd rather be up 9."  The Tar Heel magic began from there. After a Lebo pick and score in the backcourt and a Brad Daugherty block leading to another Lebo layup, we were down only 5 with 2:40 to go. After the next timeout, Steve Hale's steal and bucket had us down only 3. Even though the coin pelting intensified, we stood arm in arm listening to Coach Smith as if he were telling us a fable.   We forced 5 straight stops in route to a Brad Daugherty tap-in and a Kenny Smith steal and the "and one”. The next thing you know, we were tied. With :03 seconds to go, Smith steps to the line. Rolls of toilet paper, cups and heated coins rained down on the floor and the bench. Kenny sank both free throws. We escaped with a few penny burns, a lesson well learned, and a sweet victory.   A season later, during my first season as the Lexington Senior High head basketball coach, we were down 19 in the fourth quarter of a game against North Davidson. During a timeout, I looked at my players and confidently said, "We are right where we want to be!" Of course, I received the same befuddled look from my players that Coach had gotten from me, but more importantly, we got the same result...a sweet dignified victory compliments of the wisdom of Coach Smith!  by James Daye UNC Class of 1986 Follow James Daye on Twitter @exheel4  (Feb 11, 2015 | post #1)

North Carolina Tar Heels NCAA Basketball

James Daye Remembers Coach Smith and The Power of Positiv...

After starting the 1985-86 basketball season 17-0, the Tar Heel basketball team moved to the Dean E. Smith Center to face archrival Duke. We defeated Duke that Saturday and quickly boarded a flight to Marquette for a Sunday afternoon game. Coach Smith despised back-to-back games because of the academic and physical detriment to the players. The lesson I learned about the power of positive thinking at Marquette shaped my coaching career. å  Coach Smith and Bobby Knight vehemently protested against back to back games, 9 p.m. games or later and the lack of "meal money" for players. Nonetheless, the NCAA benefited financially from network scheduling, hence our trip to Marquette.  Rick Majerus had the Marquette fans so fired up they were heating up coins with cigarettes lighters and tossing them at our bench. In spite of our number 1 ranking, Marquette shot a blistering 68% from the field well into the final minutes of the game while holding us to meager 38%. With 4:11 to go Coach Smith called a timeout with us down 53-62. As we huddled, arm in arm in Tar Heel unity, I heard a phrase which has resonated in my brain since that day. Coach kneeled down and said, "We are right where we want to be!" I looked at Curtis Hunter and said, "I'd rather be up 9."  The Tar Heel magic began from there. After a Lebo pick and score in the backcourt and a Brad Daugherty block leading to another Lebo layup, we were down only 5 with 2:40 to go. After the next timeout, Steve Hale's steal and bucket had us down only 3. Even though the coin pelting intensified, we stood arm in arm listening to Coach Smith as if he were telling us a fable.   We forced 5 straight stops in route to a Brad Daugherty tap-in and a Kenny Smith steal and the "and one”. The next thing you know, we were tied. With :03 seconds to go, Smith steps to the line. Rolls of toilet paper, cups and heated coins rained down on the floor and the bench. Kenny sank both free throws. We escaped with a few penny burns, a lesson well learned, and a sweet victory.   A season later, during my first season as the Lexington Senior High head basketball coach, we were down 19 in the fourth quarter of a game against North Davidson. During a timeout, I looked at my players and confidently said, "We are right where we want to be!" Of course, I received the same befuddled look from my players that Coach had gotten from me, but more importantly, we got the same result...a sweet dignified victory compliments of the wisdom of Coach Smith!  by James Daye UNC Class of 1986 Follow James Daye on Twitter @exheel4  (Feb 11, 2015 | post #1)

NCAA Basketball

Where is James Daye now?

You can also find former UNC Tar Hell and winning basketball coach at http://www.ultimat esportsreview.com/ blog  (Jul 1, 2014 | post #3)

NBA Basketball

James Daye on LeBron James - "Get James" - Ultimate Sport...

Former UNC Tar Heel James Daye weighs in on LeBron James' choices for next season. It's an interesting read: feed://www.ultimat esportsreview.com/ blog/feed/  (Jun 29, 2014 | post #1)

University of North Carolina NCAA

This Will Go Down On Your Permanent Record

Congratulations to all of them. They're good guys and real winners.  (Jun 28, 2014 | post #3)

Greensboro, NC

The James Daye dilemma - Blogs - The Buffalo News - Update

I've read that deposition and you are correct. It says James Daye did nothing wrong.  (Jun 28, 2014 | post #2)

Greensboro, NC

James Daye Responds Well

Former UNC Tarheel James Daye has seen his share of controversy. Unfortunately, it's not an uncommon scenario for a successful man of color. What is his response? "Strip a man of his dignity; He finds faith; Strip a man of his life: He tries to build a new one; Strip a man of justice and he fights back if he's a man, for if he does not, his lack of effort molds a tragic future."  (Jun 24, 2014 | post #1)

North Carolina Tar Heels NCAA Basketball

James Daye is the Best...the Carolina Way

Play hard. Play smart. Play together. These tenets of the Carolina Way allowed Dean Smith's players to hold their heads high in both victory and defeat because there was always victory in the process. There was integrity in the process. Instead of focusing on victory, the opponent, or what the press was saying, Smith's teams focused on basketball. Form UNC Tarheel James Daye focuses on basketball and teaching his players. He learned from the best and when he follows what he learned, he IS the best.  (Jun 20, 2014 | post #1)

North Carolina Tar Heels NCAA Basketball

Are you a winner - Roy Williams, Rashad McCants, Buzz Pet...

It's always how you play the game. Let's play the game with fairness, passion, hard-work, dedication, responsibility and clear vision. Isn't winning more important? The emphasis on winning is only bad if the category is too narrow. When we expect athletes to win on the court and not in the classroom, the field is too narrow. When we expect coaches to win on the court and ignore their athletes' financial circumstances, the field is too narrow. When winning supersedes fairness, accountability, or compassion and encourages unsubstantiated allegations, denial, and acquiescence, can we really call it winning? Who best represents UNC Tarheel winning - Roy Williams, Dean Smith, Michael Jordan, PJ Hairston, Rashad McCants, Tami Hansbrough, Kenny Smith, James Daye, Buzz Peterson?  (Jun 14, 2014 | post #1)

North Carolina Tar Heels NCAA Basketball

Where is James Daye now?

Getting rave reviews at Flow Jaguar: http://www.flowjag uargreensboro.com/ index.htm Here are a few from Cars.com http://www.cars.co m/dealers/107007/f low-auto-center-of -greensboro/review s/ Great Service by Land Rover Newbie from Greensboro, NC | April 12, 2014 James Daye was excellent! Good communication and ensured it was a smooth and easy process. Highly recommended! 5.0 out of 5.0 Flow is Incredible! by DB from Greensboro, NC | March 29, 2014 By far the best car buying experience that I have ever been involved with, and I have purchased around 20 cars in the past. James was so patient and never made us feel pressured. Bobby was extremely helpful as well. I will never buy a car anywhere else! 5.0 out of 5.0 Range Rover Evoque by Charlotte Guy from Denver, NC | March 29, 2014 James Daye was my sales consultant. He was very professional and timely with responses to my questions. 5.0 out of 5.0 Wonderful experience by Wonderful Experience from Maryville, TN | March 24, 2014 Mr. Daye was an absolute pleasure to work with. He took care of our every need while we were at Flow Land Rover of Greensboro. Most of the conversating with the purchase of my Land Rover was done over the phone. I will be recommending Mr. James Daye to family and friends. He was such a tremendous help and does a GREAT job for this company. I appreciate everything he has done for me. 5.0 out of 5.0 Rock & Roll! by Hank from Greensboro, NC | February 24, 2014 I have always wanted a Jaguar and James Daye and Flow Jaguar made this happen for me! It just doesn't get any better than this! 5.0 out of 5.0 Exceptional Service with Class! by Mike C. from Charlotte, NC | February 22, 2014 I had a wonderful experience with Flow Jaguar! I am very impressed with the level of customer service and the desire to go above and beyond to get me into the car that I always wanted. I saw my dream car in the parking lot of the grocery store, and was forntunate enough to talk to the owner. He gave me good reviews about the Jaguar XF. Later in the day while traveling, I would see a Jaguar dealership and decided to explore my dream. I met James Daye at Flow Jaguar and the rest is history, I was sold! I am now the new owner of my first Jaguar! Thanks to Bobby Peppin, James Daye, and Flow Jaguar! 5.0 out of 5.0  (Jun 6, 2014 | post #1)

North Carolina Tar Heels NCAA Basketball

James Daye – Former Tarheel Award Winning Coach and Athlete

Former UNC Tarheel, James Daye is an award winning coach and athlete, and an astute sports analyst. Coaching Accomplishments • 1990 Coach of the Year, Big East 4A Conference, North Carolina • 1989-1990 Coached North Carolina 4A State Basketball Semi-finalists (upset 2 nationally-ranked teams) • 1988-1989 Led North Carolina 4A State Basketball Team to quarterfinals • 1988 Won Coach and Team of the Year, Western North Carolina • 1987-1988 Coached North Carolina 2A State Basketball Championship Team • 1986-1987 Led North Carolina 2A State Basketball Team to semifinals Personal Basketball Accomplishments • 2014 Masters Basketball Association National Senior Championships Winning Team 50+ • 2014 Masters Basketball Association National Senior Championships All Tournament Team • 2014 Buffalo Masters Basketball 50+ Championship Team • 2014 Buffalo Masters Basketball Tournament All-Star Team • 2009 Sidney Australia, World Games Men’s Basketball Elite, Gold Medalist • 2005 Edmonton Alberta, World Games Basketball Elite, Silver Medalist • 1996-2007 Rick Sharpe Award, University of North Carolina Basketball • 1984-1986 Division I Basketball Scholarship http://ultimatespo rtsreview.com/blog /  (May 31, 2014 | post #1)

NBA Basketball

Will he stay or should he go? I think the owners may vote...

From James Daye's Ultimate Sports Review regarding Marc Cuban's remarks and the vote on Donald Sterling: "Commissioner Silver may be in for a surprise when the count is done. With only one African American owner in the club, casting a vote to oust a wealthy white colleague may create a sense of uneasiness amongst other wealthy comrades at the country club. My guess is they will avoid setting a precedent that could make it easier to remove them should they find themselves caught in the midst of some future misunderstanding. " What do you think? http://www.ultimat esportsreview.com/ blog  (May 28, 2014 | post #1)

North Carolina Tar Heels NCAA Basketball

Teaching on and off the Court

Some coaches focus on winning. Others concern themselves with graduation rates. Rarely is a coach able to combine a winning record with a 100% graduation rate. Former UNC Tarheel James Daye did so for over 10 years straight with a coaching record of 304 wins: 78 losses and 100% graduation rate of high school basketball athletes plus a 97+% rate of athletes attending college.  (May 27, 2014 | post #1)