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Chicago, IL

Topix Chitown Regulars

Annie's Mailbox is up for Saturday the 29th; near the top of the threads :)  (May 29, 2010 | post #25878)

Chicago, IL

Annie's Mailbox 05/29/10

LW1: Where did he state that sex is his priority, Annie? He said he wants CLOSENESS. Your answer was way off base IMO. LW2: He's depressed? Maybe. Or maybe he's just a lazy kid who will mooch because Dad lets him. LW3: Yawn. Boring beige. Next kitchen project: homemade fudge as a gift for our senior pastor, whose last day is Monday.  (May 29, 2010 | post #2)

Chicago, IL

Annie's Mailbox 05/27/10

Frankly, I find it something of a compliment AND something of an insult to be compared to Angela, LOL Can you explain why you think I sound snarky? 'Cause this is really puzzling to me. I just don't get where I sound like I'm claiming to know everything. Good lord, I'm not that arrogant! As Race said, I'm only posting from my own experience. Which is only 2 years, anyway. I think the InterNet is a terrible medium for communication because there is no inflection in the words. I've never once tried to be snarky to anyone here, with the exception of my snotty "tantrum " comment yesterday - and that was provoked. The only snark that's deliberate on my part is directed toward LWs and the columnists.  (May 29, 2010 | post #42)

Chicago, IL

Annie's Mailbox 05/27/10

I've never once claimed to be always right. You have serious issues, buddy. You really should seek therapy.  (May 27, 2010 | post #29)

Chicago, IL

Annie's Mailbox 05/27/10

Sadly, that's true. That's why we highly recommend choosing a POA who will respect your wishes. Sometimes, it's not your spouse, but a child.  (May 27, 2010 | post #26)

Chicago, IL

Annie's Mailbox 05/27/10

Feel better now that you've had your little tantrum?  (May 27, 2010 | post #25)

Chicago, IL

Annie's Mailbox 05/27/10

I didn't say there was a one-size-fits-all answer. I said that a DNR order covers any and all measures taken to prolong life. That's the truth. A LIMITED DNR may address only CPR, however.  (May 27, 2010 | post #22)

Chicago, IL

Annie's Mailbox 05/27/10

CPR is not the only thing addressed by a DNR, Thoren. It addresses any and all measures taken to prolong life, CPR among 'em.  (May 27, 2010 | post #20)

Chicago, IL

Annie's Mailbox 05/27/10

The best answer: Yes. All of 'em. Always bring a new copy with you, if you think about it, at any hospitalization. I know that's a major PITA, but it helps a lot.  (May 27, 2010 | post #19)

Chicago, IL

Annie's Mailbox 05/27/10

I have the answer because I work as a chaplain in a hospital, Tonka. If I were only parish ministry, of course I would not know. If I had a dollar for every time some poor sod is dragged to the ER when s/he is already 82 and halfway to the Other Side - and there IS a DNR on file - I'd be wealthier than most of you. It's frustrating to the medical staff, and to us, when this happens.  (May 27, 2010 | post #8)

Chicago, IL

Topix Chitown Regulars

Annie's Mailbox is posted for today; just scroll down the main page.  (May 27, 2010 | post #25699)

Chicago, IL

Annie's Mailbox 05/27/10

LW1: I'm more bothered by the fact that he's stupid enough to play with a cell phone while he's driving than I am over the possible cheating. LW2: Or you could try growing a backbone and telling people that you're not the Holiday Inn Express. LW3: Get a clue, Annie. A DNR when signed in the presence of witnesses (and no, it does NOT need to be notarized) is legally binding & the patient's wishes should be respected. Furthermore, a DNR only goes INTO effect when no improvement of the health is expected. It's pointless to bring a person to the ER when a DNR is on file. It causes needless pain for the family & clogs the ER's space and the medical staff's time.  (May 27, 2010 | post #2)

Chicago, IL

Annie's Mailbox 05/27/10

Dear Annie: The other day my 2-year-old son picked up his father's BlackBerry and gave it to me. When I looked at it, the web browser was on a site where women post sexually explicit ads with pictures. I confronted my husband, and he claimed he was only checking out the website because a work associate suggested it and he was bored while driving home. I have never suspected him of cheating, but this is the second time he has been to this website and used this excuse. I cannot stop crying and thinking about it. I am also appalled that he would risk his life and his family's future by checking out a website while driving. It must have been really important to him. I don't know what to do. — Arizona Dear Arizona: Looking at porn sites that advertise can be a prelude to cheating, and in any case, the lying is a serious issue. Tell your husband that his behavior is undermining your trust and you would like him to go with you for counseling. You know the rest — if he won't go with you, go without him. You need to discuss this with a professional and develop some coping skills. Dear Annie: I recently had a visit from an old friend and am still fuming about it. Because I have a nice home and live in a desirable vacation spot, there are people who expect me to be thrilled that they popped in to see me. For those who do the visiting, here is my advice: — Don't plan to stay more than three days in someone's home. After that, get a hotel room. — Don't expect your hosts to do everything for you. Take care of yourself, and don't be a burden. — Rent a car or take a bus if you want to see the sights. They don't owe you a tour, and if they drive you anywhere, offer to pay for gas. — When they get home from a long day at work, don't tell them you were bored lounging in their house all day. — If they take you somewhere, don't make a mess of their car, complain about how long the trip is or expect them to stop every 15 minutes so you can use the bathroom. Hopefully they will see themselves and get the message. — You Are No Longer Welcome Here Dear You: We suspect this friend is not the easiest to get along with on a good day and, as a guest, was particularly annoying. Even so, all guests should try to be as considerate as possible if they expect to be invited back. Dear Annie: You recently printed a letter from "Scared Daughter-in-Law, " who asked whether or not to call 9-1-1 since her relative had a DNR request. Your response focused on the legal requirements, but I'd like to get into the other aspects. Her letter doesn't say if the mother-in-law is bed-ridden, terminal and in constant pain, or why she signed the DNR in the first place. Is she under a form of hospice care for those nearing the end? And most importantly, what would she want her family to do? One should respect the wishes and dignity of those facing the end of their earthly existence. My father recently died at home in my presence after a long illness, also with a signed DNR. I have no idea what the legal requirements were (I didn't ask his doctor), but I know what he wanted. And to be honest, if the legal conflicted with the moral, then the family has some hard decisions to make. In such circumstances, you may have better suggested she talk to her fellow church members or a wise friend. — Reader in Bangkok Dear Bangkok: We understand the sentiment, but taking matters into your own hands could result in a murder charge. We urge all readers who are faced with caring for relatives to check the requirements and legal ramifications of a DNR with their doctor and a lawyer.  (May 27, 2010 | post #1)

Chicago, IL

Ask Amy 5-27

You nailed it, RACE. No pun intended ;)~  (May 27, 2010 | post #22)

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