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Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Council debates sleeping ban in park - News

Agitate, but don't aggravate, the point is to always be humane when dealing with the homeless. That's always been the undercurrent motto of Honolulu City government. Because: 80% of the homeless problem is due to poor mental health, not economics, a well known fact. So rousing people and forcing them to move elsewhere (sleep in the bushes near a school) is not solving anything. Granted, some people will never stop complaining, just as some people will never really understand the issues involved with being homeless. Complain, complain, it doesn't change an thing. We need ways to care for homeless people, harrassing them just doesn't work. Pass new laws, it never works. People to people, we need trained professionals and ways to care for homeless people, not prosecution.  (Feb 12, 2009 | post #4)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Akaka Bill, lacking ban on gambling, is revived - News

Under the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, Tribes are equal to but not allowed to exceed the State's gaming standards. For example: Washington State's "Lotto" sweep stakes opened the door for Class II "High Stakes" Bingo on Reservation's within the State. When the State expanded to include a variety of electronic "instant winner" games networked together wherever liquor is sold, that action opened the door for Class III electronic slot machines on Reservations within the State. Even though Washington state prohibits slot machines in State licensed card houses and elsewhere, the technology is virtually the same and therefore allowable on Reservations. So native Hawaiian gaming would only be permissible if the State elected and opted to allow itself the same opportunity. Hence, I'd venture a guess that the exclusion of the gaming prohibition (and it was specified in the last Akaka Bill), is a sign post that State lawmakers are opening the back door and testing the waters. Perhaps, looking to revamp 5,000 room hotels is Waikiki and neighbor Islands turning them into "Casinos " thinking it might save the State's lagging economy. Lobbyists have been attempting to do exactly this for the last 50 years. Don't blame Native Hawaiians for self-serving' non-Hawaiian initiatives.  (Feb 5, 2009 | post #30)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Akaka Bill, lacking ban on gambling, is revived - News

Here's the dilemma, years and decades are going by and nothing is getting done, a maze, a logjam, a torrent of repressed civil rights, a dumbing down of things previously fought for and won, on and on. I work in "Indian Country" and things "do" move slow, not because of the people or any supposed lack of ability or knowledge, but due to practically 'everything' we accomplish is a developmental problem. Because it's something we've never done before, and we're beset on doing things our way, it's in our blood. I have no doubt that native Hawaiians will face similar upshots and out-takes making 'their' government work. Congress passing a bill is simply the umpire yelling 'batter-up.' Take my word, the first inning may take another hundred years. It's up to the native people and how well they do. BUT, it's got to start SOMEWHERE! So, passing the Akaka Bill would, if nothing else, initiate Day One, and the rest is up to you (the native people). Prosper, I dare you.  (Feb 5, 2009 | post #3)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Ceded lands conflict should be resolved in sovereignty ta...

It's crass trying to wish something of such enormity and value would just 'go away.' Get It Straight! Who are you kidding, in 1980 under immense pressure, criticism, and massive protests, an outcry from native Hawaiians that was given majority credence by the general population, the Hawaii State Legislature 'interpreted' the Admissions Act to 'mean' an equal 20% share of the Ceded Land's revenues. The bill passed by the Legislature demarking that a 20% share of the Ceded Land's revenue go to the benefit of native Hawaiians was later upheld by the Supreme Court. That too, is part of history. Something that can't be erased and shouldn't be ignored. All that is being debated here, is the essence of what came before. A squabble about 'racism' which itself sounds a lot like the real thing. Enough already! We do not live in a 'purest' society, we live in a land governed by laws.  (Feb 2, 2009 | post #38)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Insurer punished for failing to pay claim - News

Talk about greed and deception; all my life I've paid insurance companies and never received a dime! Then, to learn that money I and others have contributed is being used to 'deny' and subvert obviously rightful claims, that's too wrong. I'd like to pat the Kauai Judge on the back and say 'Hey Brah! U rock!!!'  (Jan 15, 2009 | post #7)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

OHA wants ban on ceded-land sales - News

Chicken Little Xs 3, what's wrong with 'pure' justice for native people? That is, void of nay-saying and ignorant 'poLittlitcal' opinion. It's a basic civil right not to be robbed of what you own, protecting your interests. Yet whenever it comes to what natives value most, 'aina, everybody can't resist piling on, getting into the frey using mixed-up pointless ideologies. Come on people! Objecting to somebody else selling your land is a basic human right... protecting what's your's; read, read, read, injustice against native Hawaiians is as simple as the nose on your face. Geeze!  (Jan 13, 2009 | post #6)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

OHA, courts defy request to cut budget - News

No love for OHA? Well it is a State agency. Trouble is, the real issue is 1/5th of the income from ceded lands transfered in the State's Enabling Act. Simply, at the time of statehood Native Hawaiians were treated like an ophan child. The new State of Hawaii adopted that child in return for the ceded lands. However, the feds threw in a priviso that 1/5th of the income from that land, like an endowment, must be set aside to care for the child. This obligation went totally neglected for a couple decades, but the child grew up, got smarter and soon started demanding due payment. So, the State created OHA as a receptical for that money (one pocket to the other) and short on memory every few years the State keeps trying to wiggle out from having to "pay the bill." Even though obligated by law. Hence, the words State Judiciary,OHA and state "cut-backs, " in the same sentence is a joke. Real native Hawaiian sovereignty doesn't rest with the State, it's a federal issue concerning the federal obligation to enforce the trust it established. Donna Kim knows this, and is simply trying to make political hay out of yours and others dislike for OHA and what you can't change, thus she's distracting the media from the real issues concerning the budget.  (Jan 7, 2009 | post #17)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Hawaii falls to No. 28 in national foreclosures - Business

Eh, sort of a misleading bye-line heading, don't you think? Receding 2 positions, from #26 to #28 is hardly a "fall." Expecially, when you're speaking about a magma of pain ratio describing how in 11 months 2848 familes have had their lives torn asunder by the Isle's economy. That should be described more like a downward spiral with no end in sight. Whoopee, doesn't come to mind.  (Dec 11, 2008 | post #1)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Kailua couple offers bounty of $100,000 for homebuyers - ...

Gimme a break, gimmicks don't sell property, under market values in relation to comparable sales is what sells property. First by reducing the price by 23%, then annoucing 'what the heck, I'm willing to pay 6% commissions plus an additional 3% to find some 'sucker' only garrans that the first comment is right. Offers will surely come in at $1 mm or even less, "that's about right" exactly as predicted. Hauula's fine, if you never have to leave there, but either direction it's a risky one lane ride, even in a limo, so good luck. The smart bet would be to sit tight, wait out the storm, and not 'forcast' your punches. Because even in a 'great' market expensive Hauula waterfront is a hard sell. So, this article was ill advised and by the way, a potential deal killer. Stick to what your 'realtors' are telling you and stop trying to monkey with the market place.  (Dec 11, 2008 | post #2)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

State has not changed position on ceded lands - Editorials

Exactly, and it was 'legislative' action that recognized in 1980 that 1/5th of the revenues from Ceded Lands are payable to native Hawaiians. Arguing differently, saying that native rights can be sold without their consent (giving away the farm) truly isn't "pono." The protesters have it right and the State, arguing for it's single minded and prejudicial self-interest, is wrong. Whinning, Lingle and Bennett trying to wiggle out of the State's obligation to uphold the law and serve native Hawaiian interests, is merely an abuse of power. Especially, since the wrongful deeds against native Hawaiians acknowledged by the Apology Act and stemming from the illegality of the 'overthrow,' would be continued by wholesale disregard of native interests. Native Hawaiians have every right to use every opportunity to 'STOP' the arrogant plunder by the State. Clouded by politics and misguided, the State has no right to assert claim by 'Spin' and that's all this article is, spin by people who should know better. Touch the soil, does it scream "Lingle" or does it scream for justice, natural and pure. Native Hawaiians, you are RIGHT, so right and so honest. Your ancestors I'm certain are very proud of your protest and forthright actions protecting your collective heritage.  (Dec 11, 2008 | post #4)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Hawaiian sovereignty will nullify Supreme Court ruling - ...

The Akaka Bill alone gives native Hawaiians a right not to be overtly opptimistic. After all, the Akaka Bill has been pending for a decade or more and still has ample opposition. Not to mention it's a process, not an overnight solution. Further, the State has never fully honored the 20% payment obligation, so why trust the State now? Especially since the proposed land purchase promising 1/5th of the current sale value for a public use--isn't the same as 'protecting future revenues intending to impact future generations.' Plus, the State is dictating the properties 'highest and best use.' Na-na-na-na-na !?! That ain't right! Lastly, the word "preserved " imbedded in the Apology Bill implies a "reserved right" meaning perserved for a time when the actual "purpose " of native Hawaiian sovereignty is established and fully defined, something that hasn't happened yet and may take years, if not decades. Consequently, it's the State and not native Hawaiians that should wait, beginning with pulling the law suit and giving a solution proper time to evolve from within the native Hawaiian people. Saying otherwise, only shows ignorance, self-interest and deceit.  (Nov 26, 2008 | post #4)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Hawaiians rally to save ceded lands - News

Richard, The so called Apology Bill confirms that native Hawaiian 'civil' rights were abused resulting from the illegal overthrow of the Monarchy by U.S. citizens who by the Treaty of Amity between the U.S. and Hawai'i, were traitors, not heros. The U.S. government was obligated to protect Hawaiian interests, it did not (period). Fast forward, statehood and the neglect of legal sanctions intended to uphold and respect native Hawaiian rights were set aside. Today, the correct legal focus and object of this protest is 'just get on-with-it, and give native Hawaiian their due.' They, and not the general public, as the Governor and others wrongfully claim, are the actual one's whose 'civil rights' are being abused. They own what they never relinquished in the first place, the same as any other supposedly legal property owner. Justice belongs to native Hawaiians, and it's long, long overdue.  (Nov 25, 2008 | post #12)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Diversity in isles molded message - News

Thank you Susan, that was a well-spring of thoughts. Yes, the goodness of Hawai'i isn't just tourism, it's place. And, a place with purpose. I used to lead the American Indian community there, and we found hundreds of native American children adopted into mutiracial families and brought to Hawai'i to be raised. They always found themselves coming to the Indian Center looking to find their true identity. We helped as many as we could. Point is, Hawai'i is a place that encourages a person to search for selfhood. It's always a personal search and Barack Obama is no different. He was given a 'leg up' by the Island spirit, that is the true nature of Aloha. The native Hawaiians know it, and now the whole World knows it. Hawai'i is an extreme place of virtue, made so by the fabric sewn together by the harmony of the ones who listen and react to the spirit of Aloha. It takes Islands, to raise a President.  (Nov 5, 2008 | post #2)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

GOP faults Obama's grandma visit - News

Oh yeah, two-faced two-hearts. Why fail to fault $150,000 luxury shopping sprees at designer stores and a high paid make-up artist earning more than any other person in the McCain campaign? Yet, when Barack Obama elects to risk losing the election to rush to a beloved ones side, it's not duty. Actually, it was. Those tears we saw last night were real, and the journey back to Hawai'i at such a critical time done a lot, said a lot, made a perfect campaign point about the man we are soon to elect. The man doesn't hesitate when it comes to family. Sadly, a body without a head, the GOP is wrong again as they've been for the last 8 years.  (Nov 4, 2008 | post #7)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin

Isle House delegates saw flaws in bailout - News

Right-on Neil & Mazie, giving Paulson who bailed on Goldman Sachs with a golden parashute a free rein would be a mistake. He's as much of the problem as anybody else. If anybody, you might both remember the problems when the housing bubble burst in Hawai'i, a problem stemming from Japan's overinflated economy, a problem that was fixed by Japan requiring their failing lending institutions to dramatically increase their on-hand reserves to protect against risky loans abroad. They bite the bullet. We too came through it. So, I say patch the holes in the economy before you pour more water (money) into the leaky bucket. Secondly, the war in Iraq, obviously it's time to leave and leave quick. Plus, they owe us their $$ billions in surplus. Third, oil company profits are as much to blame as anything or anybody, it's obsurd how the Bush government has allowed them to dig consumers into **** never once offering to help. They and not the tax payers should be bailing out Wall Street. Lastly, the bill itself, Bush/Paulson crying wolf and putting all the eggs in one basket was more to blame for the market's fall then the defeated bill, which everybody knows is drastically flawed. Printing more paper is no way to save a nation's economy. It's just smoke and mirrors.  (Sep 30, 2008 | post #3)