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Gout

Types of Gout

There are more than 18 documented types of gout. This ranges from gout affecting joints to gout not affecting joints, to some which resemble rheumatic fever of which the attacks may last for weeks. The types of gout that are probably best known are: a) True gout - this is the result of overly high uric acid naturally occurring in the system and producing monosodium urate crystals that are normally deposited in and around joints. b) Pseudo-gout - this is caused by calcium pyrophosphate crystals that are also deposited in and around joints. Pseudo-gout meaning “false” gout can cause gout and also coexist with gout. However, the appearance of these crystals in joint fluid, vary distinctly when viewed under a microscope. c) Calcium phosphate crystal deposition disease deposits ultramicroscopic crystals that are not acidic, into joint fluids. The crystals are snowball-like clumps that occur in rheumatic conditions. This syndrome occurs in young woman, less often in young men, and is treated the same as gout. d) Calcium oxalate crystal deposition disease is rare but most often occur in patients receiving hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis  (Dec 13, 2010 | post #1)

Gout

What is purine?

This is a natural substance found in all of the body’s cells and in virtually all foods. It provides part of the chemical structure of our genes and the genes of plants and animals. A small number of foods contain concentrated amounts of purine. These foods are mostly also high-protein foods and include organ meat like kidneys, fish like herring and sardines and also yeast. Seafood is an infamous culprit.  (Dec 13, 2010 | post #1)

Gout

Complications of Gout

What are the complications of gout? If uric acid levels remain raised for long periods of time, or there are frequent recurrent attacks, deposits of uric acid salts may appear around the joint. These are called tophi and appear as chalky coloured nodules. The may also appear in other areas of the body such as the ears. Recurrent severe attacks and tophi can cause permanent damage to the joints. Surgery may be required to restore the joint and this can include joint replacement surgery. Damage to the delicate filters of the kidneys and the developement of kidney stones can impair kidney function which can lead to renal failure. In order to prevent the complications of gout it is critical to treat gout attacks quickly and prevent further attacks by adopting a healthier life style. Gout is a progressive and long term disease. Speak to your physician and decide what route would be best for you.  (Dec 13, 2010 | post #1)

Gout

What are the causes of Gout?

One must be careful when describing gout “causes”. Many people think that the food they eat or the alcohols they drink are the "cause" of their gout. This in fact is not true. While there are only a couple of true known causes for gout, there are a myriad of triggers that can instigate an attack or flare up. The major cause are: · The body is producing too much uric acid during the metabolism of purine · The body is unable to eliminate uric acid effectively · The purine intake is too high due to a purine rich diet · Genetic defect in metabolism, which causes overproduction and retention of uric acid  (Dec 13, 2010 | post #1)

Gout

The 4 stages of Gout

1. Asymptomatic stage – urate levels rise in the blood, but there are no symptoms yet 2. Acute stage - Sudden attack of joint pain, swelling, hot, tender to painful and red with these symptoms lasting 3-10 days 3. Intercritical stage – this is the symptom-free interval between gout attacks. Most people have a second attack from 6 months to 2 years, while others are symptom-free for 5 to 10 years 4. Chronic stage – persistently painful joints with large urate deposits (tophi) in the cartilage, membranes between the bones, tendons and soft tissues. The skin over the deposits develop sores and release white pus. Motion is limited in the affected joint  (Dec 13, 2010 | post #1)

Gout

Defining Gout

Gout is a hereditary form of arthritis caused by an excess of uric acid in the blood causing recurrent attacks of acute arthritis usually in a single joint, followed by complete remission. Attacks result from deposits of monosodium urate crystals in and around the joints. There are more that 18 documented types of gout which include Poor man’s gout that indicates hard work, exposure, ill feeling and excessive use of malt liquors, gout in canines and Visceral gout in birds. The word arthritis is often used together with gout. So what exactly is arthritis then? It is rheumatism in which the inflammatory lesions are confined to the joints. There are over 100 types of arthritis. So then, what is rheumatism? This can be any of a variety of disorders characterized by inflammation, degeneration or metabolic disturbances of connective tissue structures, especially in joints and related structures, such as muscles, bursae, tendons and fibrous tissue. It is identified by pain, stiffness or limitation of movement in those parts. Gout can then be described in layman's terms as a medical condition usually characterized by recurrent attacks of acute and inflammatory arthritis - a red, tender to painful, hot, swollen joint. It drives from an ancient term "gutta" which referred to arthritis at the base of the big toe over 2000 years ago.  (Dec 13, 2010 | post #1)

Gout

The History of Gout

Gout was first documented in Egypt as early as 2600 BC in a description of arthritis in the big toe. In the 400’s BC the Greek physician, Hippocrates, commented that gout was absent from castrated men and premenopausal woman. In 30 AD Aulus Cornelius Celsus described the link between gout and alcohol, the later onset in woman and kidney problems associated with gout. Thomas Sydenham, an English physician noted the occurrence of gout during the late nigyhht and early morning and its preferance for older males, in 1683. Sir Alfred Baring Garrod, also an English physician realized in 1848, that uric acid in the blood was the cause of gout. He was also the first to describe the crystals in the joints of patients with gout. In 1684 the Dutch scientist, Antonj van Leeuwenhoek, first noted uric acid crystals with a microscope probably not knowing what the consequenses of the crystals where. This is an age old desease known as the “disease of Kings” probably due to their rich diet and “Poorman’s disease” probably due to exposure, hard work and the abuse of malt liquors. Today the disease does not ask where you are from or what work you do, if the circumstances are right, you are a victim.  (Dec 13, 2010 | post #1)

Health

The History of Gout

The first documentation of the disease is from Egypt in 2,600 BC in a description of arthritis of the big toe. The Greek physician Hippocrates around 400 BC commented on it in his Aphorisms noting its absence in eunuchs (a castrated man, usually one castrated early enough to have major hormonal consequences) and premenopausal women. Aulus Cornelius Celsus (30 AD) described the linkage with alcohol, later onset in women, and associated kidney problems. Though gout is not common in other species, the Tyrannosaurus rex specimen known as "Sue" is believed to have suffered from gout. While in 1683 Thomas Sydenham, an English physician, described its occurrence in the early hours of the morning, and its predilection for older males. In 1848 English physician Alfred Baring Garrod realized that excess uric acid in the blood was the cause of gout. Sir Garrod was also the first to describe the uric acid crystals in the tissues of the skin and joints of patients with gout.  (Nov 29, 2010 | post #1)

Health

Hi,

Just wanted to introduce myself. My area of interest is gout and I have done quite a bit of research on the subject. Now I want to learn what people say and experience. I hope that I could also be of some value to the community.  (Nov 29, 2010 | post #1)