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Anthropology

Amazing artifacts unearthed at Pig Point

Joe Dent an anthropologist with the American University stated "If you had asked me five years ago if we would find anything like this in Maryland, I would have said I doubt it." I guess he never heard of Paw Paw Cove where Clovis-like spearpoints were found. I would have thought that prehistoric native americans would have considered the Chesapeake Bay region an ideal location for a settlement. Maybe we need more native americans to become anthropologist and archaeologist.  (Apr 18, 2011 | post #1)

Anthropology

New evidence of first humans in North America ... in Texas

Why isn't consideration being given to Meadowcroft Rock Shelter in Pa, Cactus Hill in Va, and Topper in SC. Which would indicate an Atlantic Crossing approximately 19,000 years ago?  (Mar 25, 2011 | post #1)

Anthropology

BC-US-SCI--First Fire,126

It is my opinion that firemaking was a by-product of fabricating stone tools from flint which dates to Homo Habilis. Probably a spark hitting the dry grass. Furthermore, I thought it was Homo erectus that is credit with the control of fire, they needed it for their travels into Europe and Asia  (Mar 14, 2011 | post #1)

Anthropology

We're the Apes Who Set to Sea

There is another finding that showed homo erectus navigation 800,000 years ago. http://mc2.vicnet. net.au/home/marine rs/web/mariner1.ht ml which states: "Humans also settled the islands of Nusa Tenggara, not by swimming but after they had developed maritime navigation capability. By about 800 ka (800,000 years) ago, hominins had established a substantial population on Flores, which suggests that they had earlier settled Lombok and Sumbawa, the two major islands between Bali and Flores. The Soa Basin in central Flores, north of Boawae, consists of a series of mostly volcanic facies, transected by numerous deep drainage valleys documenting the uniformity of the geological sections (Ehrat 1925; Hartono 1961)."  (Mar 14, 2011 | post #1)

Anthropology

Early humans could navigate, evidence in Greece shows

This article states "It noted that the chiseled shards found in the areas of Plakia and Preveli in 2008 and 2009, and attributed to the Homo heidelbergensis and Homo erectus species, "constitute the most ancient sign of early navigation worldwide." There is another finding that showed homo erectus navigation 800,000 years ago. http://mc2.vicnet. net.au/home/marine rs/web/mariner1.ht ml which states: "Humans also settled the islands of Nusa Tenggara, not by swimming but after they had developed maritime navigation capability. By about 800 ka (800,000 years) ago, hominins had established a substantial population on Flores, which suggests that they had earlier settled Lombok and Sumbawa, the two major islands between Bali and Flores. The Soa Basin in central Flores, north of Boawae, consists of a series of mostly volcanic facies, transected by numerous deep drainage valleys documenting the uniformity of the geological sections (Ehrat 1925; Hartono 1961)."  (Jan 3, 2011 | post #1)

Anthropology

Ancient Teeth Discovered in Israel May Point to Oldest An...

Personally, I find this more viable than "Out of Africa". Hominids in various environments would adopt different behaviors and therefore evolve. Also, this may lend credence to human artifacts found in Calico Hills dated to 200 Kya See http://www.humanjo urney.us/america2. html which states: "By far the most startling claim of great antiquity for humans in the Americas comes from the site at Calico Hills in California. There is no doubt that some of the material excavated from Calico Hills is 200,000 years old; the question is whether the dated items are tools or simply rocks. The claims would be dismissed out of hand had they not been made by Louis Leakey of the British Museum, who together with the American archaeologist Ruth Simpson, funded by a grant from the National Geographic Society, first excavated the site in the 1960s."  (Dec 31, 2010 | post #2)

Anthropology

Oldest tool-use claim challenged

They need to find the tool that was used to make the marks and if it was shaped for that specific function then they would something worth publishing. Use of tools is a waste of paper and/or bytes. Primates probably have been using tools for more than six millions years.  (Nov 16, 2010 | post #1)

Anthropology

Early Humans' Weapon-Making Skills Sharper Than Expected

Possibly the first use of heat treating to improve the properties of a manufactured item  (Oct 29, 2010 | post #1)

Anthropology

The Paleo Diet: Why Cavemen Do It Better

They forgot to mentioned that before the cavemen ate they were very hungry or worked up an appetite hunting or gathering  (Oct 23, 2010 | post #1)

Anthropology

Archaeology: Dating oldest use of stone tools no easy tas...

Just happen upon this site http://www.leeds.a c.uk/chb/lectures/ anthl_12.html It discusses the making and use of tools by Non-Human Primates.  (Oct 11, 2010 | post #7)

Anthropology

Did Australian Aborigines reach America first?

Source http://esciencenew s.com/articles/200 9/04/29/native.ame ricans.descended.a .single.ancestral. group.dna.study.co nfirms States the following: "The team's work follows up on earlier studies by several of its members who found a unique variant (an allele) of a genetic marker in the DNA of modern-day Native American people. Dubbed the "9-repeat allele," the variant (which does not have a biological function), occurred in all of the 41 populations that they sampled from Alaska to the southern tip of Chile, as well as in Inuit from Greenland and the Chukchi and Koryak people native to the Asian (western) side of the Bering Strait. Yet this allele was absent in all 54 of the Eurasian, African and Oceanian groups the team sampled." Personally, I would put more credence in the genetic evidence than cranial morphology.  (Oct 3, 2010 | post #5)

Anthropology

Did Australian Aborigines reach America first?

Maybe the similar cranial morphology is due to being the southern hemisphere. How long did it take for the Australian Aborigines develop their distinctive cranial features? I'll wait for the genetic evidence.  (Oct 1, 2010 | post #3)

Anthropology

Neanderthals more advanced than previously thought

I hypothesize it was that Homo sapiens brought diseases with them that the Neanderthals were not immune to and they died off and probably had increase infant mortality. Similar to fate that Native Americans experience after contact with Europeans. This seems more plausible to me, because the Neanderthals understood the environment would be better at survival in Ice Age Europe better than the newly arriving Homo sapiens.  (Sep 22, 2010 | post #1)

Anthropology

Archaeology: Dating oldest use of stone tools no easy tas...

I do not understand why this is noteworthy. Chimps and other animals have been observed using tools. It is the making of tools that is noteworthy.  (Sep 9, 2010 | post #3)

Anthropology

Violence: modern vs traditional hunter gatherer societies.

Just read this in Meier, Robert J.; The Complete Idiot's Guide to Human Prehistory; Alpha Books; New York, NY 10014; 2003; p235 "There is also the recognition that Inupiat respected geographic boundaries and would not willingly encroach on someone else's territory - at least, they wouldn't without a threat of being beaten or worse. There were ways of joining with other communities in friendly relationships. One of these was in setting up hunting partners. These partners were not related or very distantly related, but they acted toward each other as if they were close relatives. ... In the end, violence did break out at times between groups, but mostly it was avoided by following some well understood rules of conduct."  (Aug 24, 2010 | post #3)

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