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Breast Cancer

Women at High Breast Cancer Risk Should Consider Preventi...

Racist post above has been reported  (Jul 17, 2013 | post #5)

Breast Cancer

Women at High Breast Cancer Risk Should Consider Preventi...

Oh my gosh I left out the insomnia. So there's more pills - sleeping pills, none of which worked. I've been off those drugs for four years and I still have insomnia. It started on those drugs for the first time and stayed. (Thank goodness the panic attacks didn't!)  (Jul 10, 2013 | post #3)

Breast Cancer

Women at High Breast Cancer Risk Should Consider Preventi...

Having taken all those drugs, let me tell you what they are like for some (50% of women prescribed them after breast cancer stop before the recommended 5 years in spite of the fact that they are clearly life-saving. Let me tell you what they were like for me. The hot flashes were far worse than menopause. They completely de-sexed me -- when I finally went off them, I was stunned to realize that there were actually two sexes on the planet! One caused migraines 2 - 3 times a week. It magnified the slightest pain. things that should have been tiny twinges felt so painful that they actually did an MRI on my knee. They could find nothing wrong with it. The next week it was my wrist. Etc. Then there were the panic attacks. I didn't know what it was until the day I was driving and my arms and legs went numb. I called 911. $8,000 later (not counting the ambulance) they announced that I had had neither a stroke nor a heart attack and could go home, although I could "stay the night" if I wanted to. With no health insurance, what do you think I did? They told me to check in with my regular physician the next day, which I did. He was horrified that they hadn't treated the panic attack. i'd never had them in my life before. Five days after I stopped Femara the panic attacks stopped -- completely. Meanwhile, I was now on Xanax as well as taking migraine medication two - three times a week, not to mention the pain killers for the non-existent injuries. So the doctor switched me to a different AI, and then I had a chronic low-level headache all the time in addition to the migraines. So he switched me to Tamoxifen. I was on it five days, and found myself sitting on the couch so depressed that I would debate for three hours whether it was worth it or not to get up and make a sandwich. Not everyone reacts that severely, but a lot of women do. Did you see ANYTHING in that article about the MAJOR side effects these drugs can cause? Because I must have missed it. If you have a mastectomy/reconst ruction, and probably ovaries reomved, you'll go through menopause, a normal experience eventually anyway, but none of what I just described. For me, AI's were Hell, bad enough to risk having that breast cancer come back. By th eway, I am one of the lucky ones so far -- it hasn't come back. It still could, but that was no life I had on those drugs. They could easily ruin your marriage. Try them, but don't let a doctor bully you, and ... don't let them lie to you, and a sin of omission (if they told you, you might not take them) is a lie. You know why they came out with this decision? Because THEY aren't comfortable with Anjalina Jolie's choice , and her courage. THEY don't like mastectomies. IT'S NOT THEIR CHOICE. It's yours. By all means, try the drugs first, but keep a diary and pay attention to how you feel.  (Jul 9, 2013 | post #1)

Breast Cancer

'Mammograms hurt' column draws ire -- OrlandoSentinel.com

Yeah. I should have just let myself die of cancer. Annual MRI? No way. Having one affected my hearing.  (Jul 8, 2013 | post #183)

Breast Cancer

'Angelina effect' welcomed as calls to breast cancer help...

I guess -- but would a stroke be better? How about bypass surgery, which my late husband had at age 52? What he went through with that wa sa lot tougher than what I went through. Our bodies are fragile and eventually they will fail us utterly and completely. This probably isn't the worst to happen to us. That's why I call it a wake-up call. Better enjoy today because tomorrow might not even be here -- and probably won't have anything to do with the breast cancer. I probably won't see it coming.  (Jul 1, 2013 | post #9)

Breast Cancer

'Angelina effect' welcomed as calls to breast cancer help...

Thank you. I wish for a long life, but know that any day might be my lsat. That was the wake-up call I got from breast cancer. Maybe I'm headed for an unexpected stroke (my doctor doesn't see a big risk) or heart attack (my doctor doesn't see a big risk). God help me, I could develop Alzheimer's. I could accidentally step in front of a bus. Any number of things could happen, and that was breast cancer's gift to me -- the awareness of just how much every day counts. It's not all bad, folks.  (Jun 30, 2013 | post #7)

Breast Cancer

'Angelina effect' welcomed as calls to breast cancer help...

The thing is, I think I was *lucky* to have breast cancer. Breasts don't keep you alive. I could have had pancreatic cancer, or lung cancer, which until recently had few effective treatments, or pancreatic cancer ... there are cancers that affect essential organs and are extremely hard to treat, like some brain cancers. I can live with one breast quite easily.  (Jun 27, 2013 | post #5)

Breast Cancer

'Angelina effect' welcomed as calls to breast cancer help...

So I guess we could say, communication helps. When you talk things out with another person, sometimes you see options you wouldn't have seen before. I just think her story is so graphic. She had her surgery started right before her aunt died of the diease. Her mother previously died of the disease. If I were her, I would have done the same thing.  (Jun 26, 2013 | post #3)

Breast Cancer

Study shows some breast cancer patients avoid endocrine t...

It's pseudo-information . If this is an issue in your life or the life of someone you care about, I urge you to put it through the shredder and get better information.  (Jun 24, 2013 | post #8)

Breast Cancer

'Angelina effect' welcomed as calls to breast cancer help...

I wonder how many people with BRCA genes will end up being saved byt Jolie's brave decision to go public with what she did? I have reconsidered. The surgery was logical, not brave. But going public -- THAT was brave. She has not always had good feedback from the media. I'm sure someone has told Jolie of this statistic. How ironic that she has traveled the world to help others in dire economic straits, and now she's helping people right here in her own country. To me tha wipes out all the strange things in her past. What counts is who you are, not how you got there.  (Jun 21, 2013 | post #1)

Breast Cancer

Etheridge: Jolie mastectomy not 'brave choice'

But no one HAS said they're making that choice because Jolie did. The very idea is ridiculous. What IS reasonable that people could look at her family history -- she lost her mother to breast cancer, and now her aunt, and she has a 95% chane of aquiring the disease that killed them, and saying "What happened to Jolie could happen to me," and make the same choice. That doesn't mean they're blindly following Jolie. We all know who Jolie is, and that puts a real face on a real problem. That isn't the same as blindly mimicking her. I can't even imagine someone marching into a doctor's office and saying "Jolie had her breasts removed. If she wanted it, I want it!" That's what these IDIOT critics are saying people will do. Clearly THEY wouldn't do it. They're sneering at others for something that isn't even happening. it's a non-issue.  (Jun 20, 2013 | post #23)

Breast Cancer

Etheridge: Jolie mastectomy not 'brave choice'

That's nice. Go step in front of a bus, then. My dad was in excellent health otherwise. My children didn't get to know him. He missed their graduating from high school, from college, getting married. He missed a lot of my adult life. He was a terrific father and I miss him. Might not miss you.  (Jun 20, 2013 | post #21)

Breast Cancer

Etheridge: Jolie mastectomy not 'brave choice'

Depends on the prostate cancer. Prostate killed my father at age 67.  (Jun 19, 2013 | post #19)

Breast Cancer

Etheridge: Jolie mastectomy not 'brave choice'

I think that would be much harder. Good for him for making it work! I think I'd have a harder time with my arms than my legs. We just saw film here of a 2 year old who lost both legs at the knee and is learning to walk with prosthetic legs. She walked two days ago. They're predicting she'll be running in a week. But arms? We do so much with our hands. I admire your brother.  (Jun 19, 2013 | post #18)

Breast Cancer

Etheridge: Jolie mastectomy not 'brave choice'

I don't think it's "brave." It's logical. She runs a 95% of developing breast cancer. She's young and she had big, dense breasts. They could have easily missed cancer in her at an early point given the current technology. She has six children she clearly loves very much; she loves her partner; she loves her charity work. She wants to live into old age, see her grandchildren, make more movies -- live, rather than die. She saw her mother die of breast cancer and much more recently, her aunt. She knew how sick her aunt was, that she was dying, when she made the decision. She had implants done and she'll look as good as she ever did. There's nothing "brave" about this, but there's nothing horrible about it, either. And, having them both done, the surgeons no doubt had no trouble making them match. That's a trick for someone like me, with one mastectomy.  (Jun 19, 2013 | post #5)