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Chicago, IL

Topix Chitown Regulars

Really? I hope that your kids turn out to be better human beings then you and dog and the rest of the trash that considers this subject to be appropriate, dumb or funny.  (Nov 25, 2013 | post #94156)

Chicago, IL

Topix Chitown Regulars

it was dog commenting on a child living with her father and what he can use her for. sickening and totally inappropriate.  (Nov 24, 2013 | post #94143)

Chicago, IL

Topix Chitown Regulars

That's what I thought. This pile of dirt needs to grow up. What an insecure and immature bonehead.  (Nov 24, 2013 | post #94141)

Chicago, IL

Topix Chitown Regulars

Did Topix just remove the whole Abby post?  (Nov 24, 2013 | post #94138)

Chicago, IL

Topix Chitown Regulars

Your teachers were more interesting then the meanie nuns at St. Aggie's.  (Nov 24, 2013 | post #94132)

Chicago, IL

Topix Chitown Regulars

I can picture him sitting there..always liked him. I remember coming home from the laundromat and hearing it on the radio. Tom and I then went to a bar.  (Nov 23, 2013 | post #94126)

Chicago, IL

Topix Chitown Regulars

Suggesting, not controlling. Anyone is free to suggest. One doesn't have to participate....that's the TOS.  (Nov 23, 2013 | post #94125)

Chicago, IL

Amy 11/23

L2: This was interesting. I hope the LW can convince her sister to get the son speech therapy. My daughter had a less severe case of this , although no name for it was mentioned it sounds like her problem, Speech therapy helped a lot and then we took her to Michael Reese for evaluation. She tested quite a bit over her age level. Despite a certain NON-PARENT mocking the situation this is a concern. You help your child to get the best help he/she needs.  (Nov 23, 2013 | post #3)

Chicago, IL

Topix Chitown Regulars

You said this very well. Who knows what we would have done with different opportunities if they were presented.  (Nov 23, 2013 | post #94113)

Chicago, IL

Topix Chitown Regulars

At this time in my life job changes are not going to happen, but if I use 20/20 hindsight I'd go almost anywhere. I was never tied to my family that much. When I was married Europe would definitely be in the running. More appreciation there for my then husband's music and good for kids to see other cultures. Later when kids are grown then anyplace other then third world countries. Although given the needed finances I'd go now long term to Europe, especially France or Spain. I kept telling my son to marry a flight attendant so I could travel, but he ignored me. Kids!!  (Nov 23, 2013 | post #94111)

Chicago, IL

Topix Chitown Regulars

Amy http://www.topix.c om/forum/chicago/T K0L66JK2QBDQC80O Abby http://www.topix.c om/forum/chicago/T 2SFHHG40UD8FTIOC  (Nov 23, 2013 | post #94108)

Chicago, IL

Amy 11/23

DEAR AMY: Recently, I misdialed my phone while attempting to call my husband. As soon as I heard the voice mail message, I realized my mistake and hung up. Several hours later, the person I accidentally called, called me and said someone from this number had called him. I told the caller that I had called his number by accident and that’s why I didn’t leave a message. I have noticed friends and family doing this all the time; they will see that they missed a call on their phone and then call that number back, not even knowing who the caller is. This seems odd to me. I don’t understand why you would return a “missed call” from someone you do not know and who did not leave you a message. What is the appropriate response to a missed call with no message left on your voice mail? Is it appropriate to call them back? Conversely, should I have left a voice mail message to the misdialed number, saying that I called the wrong number and apologize? This has happened to me a couple of times, and I would like to know the polite way to handle it. -- Miss Dialer in Saratoga, Calif. DEAR MISS DIALER: I am aware of, and also confused by, this phenomenon. The only explanation I have for the tendency to return a misdialed call (even many hours later) is sheer unadulterated curiosity. We think to ourselves: “What if the missed call is actually from the Publishers Clearing House — or Justin Timberlake?” What if opportunity is not knocking but . .& #8201;. calling? Other (younger) members of my household report that (in their world) it is now considered obnoxious to leave a message! They say when they receive a “missed call,” they consider it like a tap on the shoulder and they always respond, even if they don’t recognize the number. They return the call and say, “Hi, I’m returning a call placed from this number.” I’ll happily let readers weigh in on the reasons behind missedcallitis. DEAR AMY: My 5-year-old nephew has started school, and the teacher has suggested he needs speech therapy. My sister was quite upset at the suggestion and adamantly denies he has a speech problem. When my kids were young they spoke beautifully, but when my nephew speaks I don’t understand a word he says. I love my nephew very much and don’t want him to be delayed in other aspects of his life because of his delayed speech. From watching my sister and her son interact, I now see how often she compensates for him and repeats what he says. I don’t know if she’s doing this to show him how what he’s saying should sound, or if she’s doing it for the benefit of others trying to understand him. Perhaps this is the reason his speech is delayed, because she talks for him. Do you think this is possible? She’s not the easiest person to talk to about sensitive issues. How do I bring this up without her getting upset? -- Concerned Aunt DEAR CONCERNED: The best way to bring this up is to ask an open-ended question: “What are your thoughts about the suggestion for speech therapy?” Do not talk about your own kids’ beautiful speaking abilities at this age and don’t share your theories about why your nephew has a delay. Stick to the topic and encourage your sister to talk it through with you by asking, “Why do you hesitate about this? What are your concerns?” I agree with you that there is absolutely no downside to following the teacher’s recommendation for an evaluation and speech therapy. The sooner this is dealt with, the better for the boy. DEAR AMY: I was interested in the question from “Dad,” who was excessively worried about his daughter’s choice to travel to Europe and stay for a week with a guy she had met on a cruise the year before. Among Dad’s other worries was that his daughter (in her late 20s) was behaving in a way that was “unladylike.” I assume, therefore, that if the daughter was a son who had the exact same plans, the father would have no objection. -- Steamed DEAR STEAMED: I share your assumption.  (Nov 23, 2013 | post #1)

Chicago, IL

Abby 11/23

DEAR ABBY: I am a 15-year-old girl. Recently I made a new friend, "Mandy," and confided to her about my dark past of depression. When I explained how I used to cut myself, she burst into tears and told me she had cut herself the day before. I didn't expect that response. I know from experience that what Mandy is doing is not a good way to handle things. What stopped me from cutting was getting a permanent scar from it. Although plenty of people told me that cutting was no way to deal with my pain, the only one I listened to in the end was myself. I really want Mandy to stop. I told her not to do it, but I'm afraid she will anyway. She's an amazing person, and she doesn't deserve the pain she is causing herself. How can I help her? -- BEEN THERE IN SAN FRANCISCO DEAR BEEN THERE: Continue encouraging your friend to stop cutting, but if she's not able to, she may need professional help to quit. It is nothing to be ashamed of. A counselor at school might be able to help if Mandy is willing to talk to one. But if she isn't, then tell your mother about this so she can let Mandy's mother know what's going on. Cutting can be a sign of serious depression, and secrets of this kind are destructive. DEAR ABBY: I'm 19 and in college on a scholarship. I have decided to declare an art major. I have found a part-time job that will give me a little extra income -- figure modeling for some of the art classes. This would include both clothed and nude modeling. It isn't the only job I plan on taking, but it will help me out for the time being. Studying the human figure is essential for any art student, and it is something that has been done for centuries. When I told my parents, it was not well-received. My mother strongly disagreed with my choice and handed the phone to my sister, who told me if I want to take my clothes off I should be a stripper. Abby, this hurt me deeply. My dad is worried that it will ruin my reputation. I find it hypocritical because my mom was an art major and her portfolio contains nude figures she drew. My school is diligent about the safety and respect of its models, and I trust them. I'd like to take this job for the experience, and it will allow me to make more connections within the department I'll be studying in for the next two years. I'm not looking for my parents' approval, but I wish they would attempt to understand. What would you suggest? -- SERIOUS STUDENT IN VIRGINIA DEAR SERIOUS STUDENT: Having studied figure drawing myself years ago, I can attest to the fact that models of all ages were used -- both nude and clothed. There was nothing lurid or sexual about it, and the models were not posed in a suggestive manner or being ogled. If you wish to display your body in the context of an art class, you shouldn't have to justify it to your parents or your sister. Your mother appears to have a short memory, and your sister's comment was out of line. DEAR ABBY: My 12-year-old son still calls me Mommy. My daughter, who is two years older, calls me Mom. I don't want to hurt my son's feelings, but I think at his age he should transition to calling me Mom. What do you think? Should I just give it time, or is there an age limit for calling one's mother Mommy? -- JUST MOM IN FLORIDA DEAR JUST MOM: I think you should keep your mouth shut. There is nothing shameful or wrong about a son calling his mother Mommy if that is what he has done all his life. Frankly, it's rather sweet, and it's far more loving than some of the names people have written to me when referring to their mothers.  (Nov 23, 2013 | post #1)

Chicago, IL

Topix Chitown Regulars

Agree with Aisle Sitter, so here goes... In the words of Monty Python: "and now for something completely different" or something like that. I watch House Hunters International because I'm interested in the houses, sights and cultures abroad. People go for different reasons, but mostly for job transfers or they seek out employment. From Australia to the Middle East to Europe and everywhere in between. If anyone of you is offered a job out of the US would you pack it all up and go? Whether for a few years or even longer. Single or married, with or without kids. Would the idea of living in a different culture appeal to you? Where would you not go?  (Nov 23, 2013 | post #94102)

Chicago, IL

Topix Chitown Regulars

I agree with pretty much all of the above. I was an adult person at that time and do remember seeing what was going on at the time. The domino theory was a subject of interest to me then for some reason and still is. It's used again and again for many issues, even here. It really didn't happen except for two countries. Even Westmoreland said it was wrong. And remember Kennedy wasn't in office very long. Don't know how things would have changed had he gone full term. Look how long the middle east conflicts have been going on. You would think the pols would have learned something from history when in 10 years we couldn't "win" that one.  (Nov 22, 2013 | post #94088)

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