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Hartford Courant

Southerners looking to share their Confederate holiday

The media has gotten so bad I have begun to hate NYC. I am sick of NYC. I remember what they did to Rocker (baseball) because he told a reporter the truth as he saw it. I think that was when I began to hate NYC. NYC is controlling the country. Follow the money.....all roads lead to 1865!  (May 23, 2009 | post #775)

Hartford Courant

Southerners looking to share their Confederate holiday

Fools is sure a FOOL! Don't play the fool get some smarts see: Taking Secession Seriously–At Last By Kirkpatrick Sale 29 April 2009 http://www.frontpo rchrepublic.com/?p =2879  (May 11, 2009 | post #686)

Hartford Courant

Southerners looking to share their Confederate holiday

You are welcome Stan. I know it was a long post, but sound bites just don't tell the true story. There has been some new evidence published recently showing lincoln engineered the Fort Sumter event. Also if you read his beginning President statement with clarity you will see the threatened to invade the South at that time. This was before the first shot.  (Apr 11, 2009 | post #682)

Hartford Courant

Southerners looking to share their Confederate holiday

Cont'd Fort Sumter At 2PM, April 11, 1861, General Beauregard demanded that Major Anderson of Fort Sumter evacuate the works, which Anderson refused to do. At a little after 3AM, General Beauregard advised Major Anderson that “in one hour’s time I will open fire.” At 4:40AM, from Fort Johnson the battery opened on Fort Sumter, which fire was followed by the batteries of Moultrie, Cummings Point and the floating battery. At this time a part of the federal naval force had arrived at the Charleston bar, but strange to say, Captain Fox, after hearing the heavy guns of the bombardment decided that his government did not expect any gallant sacrifices on his part, and took no part in the battle. On April 13 after the Confederate guns had reduced Sumter to a smoking heap of ruin, Major Anderson surrendered, with no loss of life on either side. “On one side of the conflict was the South led by the descendants of the Cavaliers, who with all their faults had inherited from a long line of ancestors a manly contempt for moral littleness, a high sense of honor, a lofty regard for plighted faith, a strong tendency for conservatism, a profound respect for law and order, and an unfaltering loyalty to constitutional government.” Against the South was arrayed the power of the North, dominated by the spirit of Puritanism which, with all its virtues, has ever been characterized by the pharisaism which worships itself, and is unable to perceive any goodness apart from itself, which has ever arrogantly held its ideas, its interests, and its will, higher than fundamental law and covenanted obligations; which has always “lived and moved and had its being, in rebellion against constituted authority.” The Reverend R.C. Cave, 1894 (Land of the Golden River, Vol. II, Lewis P. Hall, Hall’s Enterprises, 1980)  (Apr 11, 2009 | post #678)

Hartford Courant

Southerners looking to share their Confederate holiday

cont'd Fort Sumter It has been said by many historians that these sites were purchased outright by the federal government. This is also false. The Act of 1794 clearly states, “that no purchase shall be made where such lands are the property of the State.” When General George B. McClellan and his federal army of 112,000 men landed on the tip of the Virginia peninsula April 12, 1862 and occupied Fortress Monroe, this action verified the Southern charge of Northern aggression. A State withdrawing from the union would necessarily assume the control theretofore exercised by the general government over all public defenses and other public property within her limits. The South, on the verge of withdrawal (from the union) had prepared to give adequate compensation to an agent of the Northern government for the forts and other public works erected on the land. Therefore, three commissioners from South Carolina, one from Georgia, and one from Alabama were sent to Washington to negotiate for the removal of federal garrisons from Southern forts. The commissioners, all prominent men, were Messrs. Robert W. Barnwell, James H. Adams, and James L. Orr of South Carolina; Martin Crawford of Georgia, and John Forsythe of Alabama, and arrived in Washington on the 5th of March. On March 12th they addressed an official communication to Mr. (William) Seward, Secretary of State, explaining their functions and their purpose. Mr. Seward declined to make any formal recognition of the commissioners, but assured them in verbal conferences of the determination of the government at Washington to evacuate Fort Sumter; of the peaceful intentions of the government, and that no changes in the status prejudicially to the Confederate States were in contemplation; but in the event of any change, notice would be given to the commissioners. The commissioners waited for a reply to their official communication until April 8th, at which time they received a reply dated March 15th by which they were advised that the president had decided not to receive them, nor was he interested in any proposals they had to offer. During this time the cabinet of the Northern government had been working in secrecy in New York preparing an extensive military and naval expedition to reinforce the garrison at Fort Sumter in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina. As they had tried to deceive the people of the North and South in January 1861 with the Star of the West (expedition to Sumter), loaded with troops and ammunition, the radical Republicans again advised the press that this mission was also a mission of mercy for the garrison of Fort Sumter, and on April 7th the expedition set sail southward bound loaded with troops and arms.  (Apr 11, 2009 | post #677)

Hartford Courant

Southerners looking to share their Confederate holiday

A Fort on South Carolina's Sovereign Soil: “For well over one hundred years, uninformed and liberal historians and others have charged South Carolina with starting the Civil War when the shore batteries at Charleston fired on the Federally-held Fort Sumter in the bay. These writers have stated that this fort was the property of the federal government. This statement is false. On March 24, 1794, the US Congress passed an act to provide for the defense of certain ports and harbors of the United States. The sites of forts, arsenals, navy yards and other public property of the federal government were ceded or assigned by the States within whose limits they were, and subject to the condition, either expressed or implied, that they should be used solely and exclusively for the purpose for which they were granted. The ultimate ownership of the soil, or eminent domain, remains with the people of the State in which it lies, by virtue of their sovereignty. South Carolina, in 1805 by legislative enactment, ceded to the United States in Charleston Harbor and on the Beaufort River, various forts and fortifications and sites for the erection of forts. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts enacted the same in its legislature in 1836. New York State, in granting the use of the site for the Brooklyn Navy Yard says: “The United States are to retain such use and jurisdiction so long as said tract shall be applied to the defense and safety of the city and port of New York and no longer…” The cession of the site of Watervliet Arsenal was made on the same terms. cont'd  (Apr 11, 2009 | post #676)

Hartford Courant

Southerners looking to share their Confederate holiday

truth about Fort Sumter, SC A Fort on South Carolina's Sovereign Soil From: Bernhard1848@att.n et When foreign troops occupy your land and sufficient warning given, a sovereign State will expel them. "The ultimate ownership of the soil, or eminent domain, remains with the people of the State in which it lies, by virtue of their sovereignty." Bernhard Thuersam Cape Fear Historical Institute Wilmington, NC www.CFHI.net  (Apr 11, 2009 | post #675)

Hartford Courant

Southerners looking to share their Confederate holiday

The truth about Fort Sumter. The First Shot? Remembering Fort Sumter: “Perhaps a word should be inserted here as to which side was the aggressor in this historic conflict. Who bears the guilt of starting the war? The North has sought to lay this stigma upon the South since we fired the first shot. But the courts (and common sense as well) have decreed that the aggressor is not the one who strikes the first blow, but the one who makes that blow necessary. The ground on which Fort Sumter stood had been lent to the Federal Government by the State of South Carolina for the erection of a fort to guard its chief harbor, but when South Carolina withdrew from the Union, the property automatically reverted to the State. Morally and legally, the first blow was not struck at Charleston, but when this fleet with hostile intent weighed anchor in the harbor of New York. Hence the guilt of aggression lies at the door of the Federal government at Washington. (See Stephens History of the US, pp. 421-429) (Some Things For Which the South Did Not Fight, Henry Tucker Graham, 1946)  (Apr 11, 2009 | post #674)

Asheville Citizen-Times

Flies the Confederate flag to show pride in the South

Who was Henry Adams that said Lincoln Lobbied for the Corwin Amendment? He was not from the South. Henry Brooks Adams (February 16, 1838 - March 27, 1918) was a U.S. historian, journalist and novelist. Born in Boston into one of the country's most prominent families (both his great-grandfather and his grandfather had been Presidents of the United States), Adams, after his graduation from Harvard in 1858, embarked on a Grand Tour of Europe, during which he also attended lectures in civil law at the University of Berlin. In 1861 his father, Charles Francis Adams, was appointed minister to England by Lincoln, and Henry Adams accompanied him as his private secretary. In 1868 he returned to the United States and settled down in Washington, D.C., where he started working as a journalist. Adams saw himself as a traditionalist longing for the democratic ideal of the 17th and 18th centuries. Accordingly, he was keen on exposing political corruption in his journalistic pieces. In 1870 Adams was appointed Professor of Mediaeval History at Harvard, a position he held until his early retirement in 1877, aged only 39. That year he returned to Washington, where he continued working as a historian. In the 1880s Adams also wrote two novels: Democracy was published anonymously in 1880 and immediately became popular. (Only after Adams's death did his publisher reveal Adams's authorship.) His other novel, published under the nom de plume of Frances Snow Compton, was Esther (1884). In 1885 Marian Adams, his wife, committed suicide. Upon her death Adams took up a restless life as a globetrotter, travelling extensively and, for years, spending summers in Paris and winters in Washington. In 1907 he published his Pulitzer Prize winning autobiography, The Education of Henry Adams. In 1912 Adams suffered a disabling stroke; in 1918 he died at his home in Washington, D.C. As a historian, Adams is considered to have been the first (in 1874 -1876) to conduct historical seminar work in the United States. His magnum opus is his History of the United States (1801 to 1817) (9 vols., 1889-1891). It is particularly notable for its account of the diplomatic relations of the United States during this period, and for its essential impartiality. Adams also published Life of Albert Gallatin (1879), John Randolph (1882), and Historical Essays (1891), besides editing The Writings of Albert Gallatin (3 volumes, 1879) and, in collaboration with H. C. Lodge, Ernest Young and J. L. Laughlin, Essays in Anglo-Saxon Law (1876). Henry Adams's brothers are also notable: * His elder brother, John Quincy Adams (1833 - 1894), a graduate of Harvard (1853), practised law, and was a Democratic member for several terms of the Massachusetts general court. In 1872 he was nominated for vice-president by the Democratic faction that refused to support Horace Greeley. * Another brother, Charles Francis Adams, Jr. (1835 - 1915), graduated at Harvard in 1856, and served on the Union side in the Civil War, receiving in 1865 the brevet of brigadier-general in the regular army. He was president of the Union Pacific Railroad from 1884 to 1890, having previously become widely known as an authority on the management of railways. Among his writings are Railroads, Their Origin and Problems (1878). * Another brother, Brooks Adams (1848 - 1927), practised law. His writings include The Law of Civilization and Decay (1895), America's Economic Supremacy (1900), and The New Empire (1902). [edit] External links * Henry Adams, Globe Trotter in Space and Time (http://www.univie .ac.at/Anglistik/e asyrider/data/HAda ms.htm) * eTexts (http://www.gutenb erg.net/catalog/wo rld/authrec?fk_aut hors=798) of Adams' works, at Project Gutenberg  (Apr 9, 2009 | post #259)

Asheville Citizen-Times

Flies the Confederate flag to show pride in the South

Connecting the dots: New York Senator William Seward (became Lincoln's cabinet secretary of state) had proposed this almost identical version earlier The Corwin amendment was and remains a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution offered by Ohio Congressman Thomas Corwin during the closing days of the 2nd Session of the 36th Congress as House Joint Resolution No. 80. The proposed — but not yet ratified and technically still pending — amendment would have forbidden the Federal banning of slavery and was a last-ditch effort to avert the outbreak of the Civil War. Corwin's measure emerged as the House of Representatives' version of an earlier identical proposal in the Senate by William Seward. William Henry Seward (May 16, 1801–October 10, 1872) was United States Secretary of State under Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson. He attended Union College, studying law, and graduated in 1820, with high honors. He then stopped his law practice to become a politician. Abraham Lincoln appointed him Secretary of State in 1861 and he served until 1869. Seward survived an assassination attempt on April 14, 1865 (the same night Abraham Lincoln was shot) from Lewis Payne, an associate of John Wilkes Booth, who broke into Seward's bedroom and stabbed him repeatedly. http://www.indoped ia.org/Corwin_amen dment.html If you believe the South left the union because of slavery, think again, they didn't have to, because Lincoln et al took steps to alleviate that issue.  (Apr 9, 2009 | post #258)

Asheville Citizen-Times

Flies the Confederate flag to show pride in the South

The amendment that the South did not vote for, and the North did. Corwin amendment The Indological Knowledgebase The text of the Corwin amendment is as follows: No amendment shall be made to the Constitution which will authorize or give to Congress the power to abolish or interfere, within any State, with the domestic institutions thereof, including that of persons held to labor or service by the laws of said State. On February 28, 1861, the United States House of Representatives approved the resolution by a vote of 133-65 (Page 1285, Congressional Globe). On March 2, 1861, it was approved by the United States Senate with a vote of 24-12 (Page 1403, Congressional Globe). A young Henry Adams observed that the measure narrowly passed both houses due to the lobbying efforts of Abraham Lincoln, the President-Elect. The resolution was signed by President James Buchanan — shortly before President Lincoln was inaugurated — but it has long been established that a Presidential signature is unnecessary in the constitutional amendment process since the President has no formal role in it as noted in the 1798 case of Hollingsworth v. Virginia, 3 U.S. (3 Dall.) 378. By the same logic, a President is powerless to veto a proposed constitutional amendment. The Corwin amendment appears officially in Volume 12 of the Statutes at Large at page 251. http://www.indoped ia.org/Corwin_amen dment.html  (Apr 9, 2009 | post #257)

Asheville Citizen-Times

Flies the Confederate flag to show pride in the South

Did you know that in 1861 Lincoln was in favor of making slavery perpetual, ie, forever? Lincoln and Corwin by Al Benson, Jr. in part Quote: "The Corwin Amendment was introduced into Congress in March of 1861. Its sponsor was Ohio Representative Thomas Corwin. That's right, folks, this man was from Ohio, not Georgia or Alabama. Some reports have stated that Corwin introduced this amendment to prevent the "Civil War." It was presented to the Congress in the form of House (Joint) Resolution No. 80. The entire idea of the Corwin Amendment was to prohibit Congress from trying to ban slavery in whatever states there were that still permitted it. The Corwin Amendment would have stopped Congress from "abolishing or interfering with the 'domestic institutions' including 'persons held to labor or service' (a reference to slavery)." Interestingly enough, a parallel resolution to the one in the House was introduced into the Senate by William H. Seward of New York, (not Georgia, but New York). In fact, Wikipedia informs us: "However, the newly formed Confederate States of America was totally committed to independence, and so it ignored the proposed Corwin Amendment." Interesting. Our so-called historians (and I use that term rather loosely here) have continued to inform us that the Southern states fled the Union solely so they could keep their slaves. If that had really been the case, here was a golden opportunity for them to keep their slaves and get back into the Union so they could vote to do so. Yet they passed it up. You don't just suppose they might have had other reasons for secession rather than slavery do you? Naw, the court historians would never admit to that fact no matter what! Also worth noting is the fact that the "great emancipator" did not oppose the Corwin Amendment. He said, in his first inaugural address: "(H)olding such a provision to now be implied Constitutional law, I have no objection to its being made express and irrevocable." In other words, a Constitutional amendment that made slavery for life the rule of law didn't bother Mr. Lincoln one iota. According to http://www.indoped ia.org "A young Henry Adams observed that the measure narrowly passed both houses due to the lobbying efforts of Abraham Lincoln, the President-Elect. " So it seems that Mr. Lincoln lobbied to get this pro-slavery amendment through both houses of Congress. Something else your history books didn't bother to inform you of. In February of 1861 the House approved the resolution by a vote of 133-65 and in early March the Senate approved it by a vote of 24-12. The seven Southern states that had already seceded from the Union at that point did not bother to try to vote on the issue, leading to the inescapable conclusion that, for them, slavery was not the real issue. Had it been the real and sole issue, no doubt they could have petitioned Washington to get back into the Union so they could have voted to keep their slaves." http://www.cakewal kblogs.com/antiest ablishmenthistory/ lincoln-and-corwin .aspx  (Apr 9, 2009 | post #256)

GoErie.com

Jena 6 lawyers seek to oust judge

This is just another black power play. The Judge will not affect the trial. The defense is doing this for publicity. If they can bring a White Judge Down then their status rises in the media and among black people. That's what the jena march was about - Black Power. Its all about power. I hope they don't win this case!  (Jul 1, 2008 | post #1)

Myrtle Beach Online

A confederate enthusiast

THESE United States of America was changed 1861-1865 to THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA - a big difference. Below is a great read on Beauvoir, MS - Open House and restored from Hurricane Katrina. A local tv flew over the area right after the storm and the one thing still standing was Jefferson Davis Statue with the Battle Flag over is arm. Overheard, out and about, Mrs. Grundy sees all, tells all By Mrs. C. R. Grundy Friday, June 20, 2008 http://www.andalus iastarnews.com/art icles/2008/06/21/n eighbors/neighbors 02.txt On June l in the Baraca Class assembly and later in the morning-worship service at First Baptist, Joe Wingard read "The Touch of the Master's Hand" by Myra Brooks Welch, a poem that makes the point that, just as a violin is changed by the touch of a master's hand, so is a soul when touched by the Master, Jesus. At the point in the poem where an old man plays a violin and thus changes its value, Lynn Twitty played "It Is Well" on her violin. Then Mr. Wingard completed the reading. This is a poem that Mr. Wingard read to his students as a thought for the day for some 39 years prior to his retirement. He said that it was his favorite thought for the day. I have asked the Portly Gentleman to tell us of his trip to Biloxi June 2-4.  (Jun 23, 2008 | post #4)

Orlando Sentinel

Group plans 'world's largest' Confederate flag near Tampa...

Try this on for size; Charles Adams new book: From "Blackwood's Magazine" "The Crisis of the American War", November 1862, pp. 636 -646 Page 79 - The past month has brought us to the veritable crisis of the great civil war in America. Brought to bay upon their own soil, the Federals in desperation have invoked to their aid the unutterable horrors of a servile war. With their armies baffled and beaten, and with the standard of the rebel army again within site of Washington, the President has at length owned the impossibility of success in fair warfare, and seeks to paralyze the victorious armies of the South by letting loose upon their hearths and homes the lust and savagery of four million Negroes. The die is cast. Henceforth it is a war of extermination. The North seeks to make the South a desert - a wilderness of bloodshed and misery; for thus only, now, does it or can it hope to overcome the seceding Confederacy. Monstrous, reckless, devilish as the project is, we believe it will not succeed. But it at least marks the crisis and turning-point of the war. It shows that the North has shot its last bolt, - the effect of which we do not yet see, but beyond which there is no other. It proves what every one in this country was loath to believe, that rather than let the Southern States be independent, rather than lose their trade and custom, the North would league itself with Beelzebub, and seek the make a hell out of half of the continent. In return, this atrocious act justifies the South in hoisting the black flag, and in proclaiming a war without quarter against the Yankee hosts. And thus, within the bosom of civilization, we are called upon to contemplate a war more full of horrors and wickedness than any which stands recorded in history. Taken from A book by Charles Adams entitled: Slavery, Secession, and Civil War, Views from the United Kingdom and Europe, 1856 - 1865, (Scarecrow Press, Inc. Lanham, Maryland, Toronto, Plymouth UK 2007). Adams, author of "When in the Course of Human Events", compiles several hundred editorials and articles from foreign Newspapers and Periodicals, (mostly English) in an attempt to give the reader some insights into the foreign view of America's "Civil War". you just got a long way to go to get a handle on this - slavery is a red herring!  (Jun 8, 2008 | post #607)

Q & A with Cajiedog

Headline:

Independent

Hometown:

Shreveport, Louisiana

Neighborhood:

Cape Canaveral, Florida

Local Favorites:

Pets

I Belong To:

now posts as JosephineSouthern

When I'm Not on Topix:

I am doing Genealogy - tracing ancestors. Playing at the Arcade and games on my computer.

Read My Forum Posts Because:

I have a lot of facts-documented stuff

Read This Book:

Blood Money The Civil War and

Favorite Things:

the Federal Reserve by John Remington Graham c2006

On My Mind:

Who started the Civil War? The New York and London Banks did it! And you are still paying for it!

I Believe In:

The Declaration of Independence. The Original Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Government by the People and for the People.