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Canada Travel

Thrifty Snowbirds Escape The Brutal Cold via The Evergree...

The winter storms that continue to blanket the US and Canada underscore the reason why a large and growing number of Evergreen Bed & Breakfast Club members in the Northern states and Canadian provinces spend their winters traveling south, away from the cold, for only $25 a day. The Evergreen B&B Club is a 32-year-old membership organization that provides inexpensive homestays for people over 50 who love to travel. Many of these people are “snowbirds” who escape the bitter winds and piles of snow every winter without breaking the bank. Bryce and Daria Anderson are two such “snowbirds. They’ve been Evergreen B&B Club members since 2009. Residents of Perham, Minnesota, the Andersons escape the freezing temperatures every winter for two months by taking long road trips to warmer states. Bryce estimates that they've stayed in the homes of over 30 different members over the years. “Being gone for two months, we tend to go long distances,” he said recently. “The Evergreen Club makes it affordable to get away from all the cold for that long.” Frommer's Budget Travel magazine calls the Evergreen Bed & Breakfast Club “a champion of the cost-conscious traveler.” With members in 2000 locations across the US and Canada, the Evergreen B&B Club is unlike any other travel club. Members pay only $75 per year to join then just $25 a night (for a couple) to their hosts. Members must agree to host fellow members in their homes – often in the guest rooms they rarely use. And more often than not, those homestays result in new, lasting friendships. The club’s small nightly gratuity includes a hearty breakfast each morning and “insider” tips from hosts on the best sights, events, restaurants, shopping, etc., in that particular town, city, or region – information travelers would never get from a hotel’s concierge desk. Yet the Andersons agree that their hosts -- the people they meet along the way -- are the best part about traveling the Evergreen way. “We meet all kinds of people from all walks of life,” Daria said. “And they’ve all been really nice, friendly, and incredibly interesting.” “That’s the truly rich part of our travel experience,” Bryce added, “getting to know people from different areas and with different backgrounds. We treasure that part the most. The affordability is great, but the people and the conversations – that’s the bonus.” The Andersons plan their escape to warmer climes first, then search the Evergreen Club’s membership on its website to determine where they’ll stay along the way. Then they use the website’s online map to get directions to their hosts’ homes, especially when they visit metropolitan areas. They’ve discovered some terrific little restaurants, shops, and other places on their trips, they said, that they never would have known about if their hosts hadn’t suggested them. “Like this little restaurant in Charleston, South Carolina,” Bryce said. “It wasn’t listed on any guides to the city, but our hosts knew about it and we loved it.” New club members are often surprised by the quality of Evergreen hospitality and the trusting nature of the hosts. As the Andersons noted, members treat each other like friends, not paying guests. The website’s directory also provides details about each homestay: the host's interests, bed sizes, whether or not there’s a private or shared bath, whether or not pets are welcome, and places of interest nearby. Members, like the Andersons, select the homestays that appeal to them then make arrangements directly with the hosts. “We’ve been to all of the warmer states during the worst of our winters by staying with Evergreen members,” Bryce said. “Arizona, Texas, California, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida – just to name a few!” Other thrifty snowbirds can learn how they, too, can escape the worst of the Northern winter by visiting www.EvergreenClub. com or by calling 1-800-962-2392.  (Jan 23, 2014 | post #1)

Durham, NC

Preservation Durham Honors Projects, People with 2013 Pre...

Preservation Durham, Inc., recently handed out 11 awards to exemplary projects and special individuals who have contributed to the preservation of the Bull City’s architectural heritage during its 2013 Preservation Awards ceremony. This year’s Neighborhood Conservation Awards, which honor projects that contribute to the historic fabric of Durham neighborhoods, went to: > The Cookery at 1101 West Chapel Hill Street, the transformation of a ca. 1920 building into a commercial kitchen for food entrepreneurs and an event space. Owners: Nick Hawthorne-Johnson and Rochelle Johnson; Architect: Center Studio Architecture, Durham; Contractor: Nick Hawthorne- Johnson, Rochelle Johnson, and Dane Thompson. > Habitat For Humanity, for the organization’s work in renovating vacant houses in East Durham’s historic neighborhoods. > The Five Points Building at 101-109 East Chapel Hill Street, a creative adaptive re-use of a large Second Empire building on a long-neglected corner of a downtown neighborhood. Owners: Center Studio Architecture, The Cupcake Bar, Bullseye Bicycle, and Pizzeria Toro, David Scarborough, Erin and Todd Mosier, and Dale and Jean Mosier; Architect: Center Studio Architecture; Contractor: Lee Street Contractors. > The ca. 1930 garage at 1506 Hermitage Court, an excellent example of preserving and restoring a small but important historic feature within the architectural fabric of the Forest Hills neighborhood. Owners: Kevin and Julie Witte; Contractor: Stephen McDevitt. Preservation Durham’s Pyne Awards are presented to both homeowners and commercial property owners for sensitive restoration projects that preserve Durham’s historic architecture and architectural heritage. This year’s Pyne Awards winners were: > Homeowners Charlene Reiss and Mark Hazelrigg for the 1935 Gamble House at 1307 North Mangum, a sensitive, authentic rehabilitation of Durham’s first Modernist building and one of very few International Style buildings in the city. Contractor: Kevin Svara of Svara Restoration. > Jay Munro and David Parker of Riverbank Construction for restoring and updating the Colonial Revival-style house at 2002 West Club Boulevard. Owners: Joseph Blocher and Marin Levy; Architect: Ron Wilde; Contractor: Munro Parker. >Homeowners Miles and Catherine Miles Honeycutt, for their thoughtful restoration of the 1927 bungalow at 1809 Bivens Street. Contractor: Miles Honeycutt of Longleaf Building and Restoration. >Homeowners Kevin and Darlene Davis for renovating the ca. 1920 colonial revival, two-story brick house at 1011 Gloria Avenue in the historic Trinity Park neighborhood. Contractor: Deanna Crossman; Interior Design: Nicole Baxter. >Self Help Credit Union for envisioning and shepherding the transformation of the former East Durham Graded School (ca. 1910), a Local Historic Landmark at 107 South Drive Street, into the Maureen Joy Charter School. Owners: Maureen Joy Charter School, Self-Help Credit Union; Architect: Belk Architecture; Contractor: CT Wilson Construction. Advocacy Awards go to individuals or groups who have contributed to the public discussion of Durham’s architecture and history, lobbied for effective preservation policies, or otherwise championed the recognition and retention of Durham’s historic resources. The 2013 winner is John Martin, a retired history professor at Durham Tech Community College who has guided several historic houses through extensive renovations and served as president of InterNeighborhood Council. Preservation Durham also presented its first People’s Choice Award this year. The public was invited to vote on a favorite adaptive reuse project in the city. The 2013 winner is Cocoa Cinnamon at 420 West Geer Street. Owners: Leon Grodski de Barrera and Areli Barrera de Grodski; Developer: Bob Chapman; Designer: David Solow. For more detailed information on the 2013 winners: http://preservatio ndurham.org/progra ms/awards/2013-pre servation-award-wi nners/.  (Nov 14, 2013 | post #1)

Durham, NC

NC Modernist Houses Announces 2014 Advisory Council

Nov. 14, 2013 (Durham, NC) – George Smart, Executive Director of North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH), has announced the 2014 NCMH Advisory Council. Members, selected for their knowledge and experience in the greater design community, serve a one-year term. The NCMH Advisory Council is comprised of a unique, diverse cross-section of architecture, real estate, historic preservation, and other disciplines. Advisory Council members support and improve NCMH’s programming and provide input on NCMH programming and events, presentations, Project Bauhow, the George Matsumoto Prize, and fundraising. The NCMH Advisory Council meets twice a year. The members of the 2014 NCMH Advisory Council are: · Ellen Cassilly, AIA · Caterri Woodrum, North Carolina Museum of Art · Randy Lanou, Buildsense · Gwynn Thayer, NC State University Special Collections · Martha Lauer, Raleigh Historic Districts Commission · Grace Ueng, Savvy Marketing Group · Tara Barthelmess, Rolesville High School · Jerry Tester, Smart Homes and Business · Marjorie Hodges, Contemporary Art Museum, Raleigh · Heather Fearnbach, Fearnbach History Services · Michael Abensour, Kramden Institute · Virginia Faust, Coldwell Banker · Wendy Robineau · Bailey Allred, HH Architecture · Kim Weiss, Blueplate PR · Bill Hopkins, AIA · Ernest Dollar, City of Raleigh Museum About North Carolina Modernist Houses: NC Modernist Houses (formerly Triangle Modernist Houses) is an award-winning 501C3 nonprofit established in 2007 and dedicated to documenting, preserving, and promoting Modernist residential design across North Carolina. The website is now the largest open digital archive for Modernist residential design in America. NCMH hosts popular architecture events every month, giving the public access to exciting residential architecture, past and present. The tours and events raise awareness of Modernist design and help preserve these "livable works of art" for future generations. For more information: www.ncmodern.org.  (Nov 14, 2013 | post #1)

Durham, NC

Preservation Durham Hosts Tour of Historic Renovation in ...

-- “Hidden Durham Tour” will take the public inside the 114-year-old building that now houses the Maureen Joy Charter School -- Preservation Durham has announced a “Hidden Durham Tour” of the newly renovated, 114-year-old Maureen Joy Charter School building on Thursday, November 14th, from 6-7:30 p.m. The once badly dilapidated building was the home of the Y.E. Smith School until 1967. Sign-ups for the tour will start Thursday, November 7th. A major step forward for the Northeast Central Durham community (formerly known as East Durham), the Maureen Joy Charter School opened its new, larger facility at 107 South Driver Street this school year, and people in the neighborhood say it has already had a positive impact on a community that, for decades, was defined by poverty and crime. “This is one of the best things that’s ever happened in East Durham,” Carrie Walker, who lives right across the street, told The Durham News in September. “This, to me, is unbelievable,” said Tony Garrett said, who lives a block up Driver Street. The Classical Revival-style building was built in 1887, first as a wood-frame building that saw major additions in the 1920s and ‘30s. Since the 1990s it has been used as a storage facility and suffered major water and termite damage, faulty wiring, and a partially collapsed roof, among other structural issues. Architect Eddie Belk, AIA, of Belk Architecture in Durham designed the $10 million renovation, correcting all the problems, uncovering windows, and creating an interior courtyard to bring more sunlight into the new school. From the main, octagonal entrance lobby, formerly walled hallways are now open and the electronics are state-of-the-art. Ceiling light fixtures are period reproductions and the original hardwood floors now gleam. “We'd love to have to alums of the Y.E. Smith School join us for this special tour,” said Wendy Hillis, Preservation Durham’s Executive Director. Preservation Durham sponsors Hidden Durham Tours of special Durham places periodically throughout the year -- “places you don’t ordinarily get to see,” said Hillis, “such as renovation projects, previews of new spaces about to open, and cool historic spots you didn’t even know were there.” Unlike Preservation Durham’s other Hidden Durham Tours, attendees for the school tour do not need to be members of the non-profit organization. Instead, tickets are being sold for $5 per person and all proceeds will be donated the Maureen Joy Charter School's library. Admittance will be on half-hour time slots from 6 until 7:30 p.m. To reserve tickets and time slots, go to http://www.signupg enius.com/go/10C0D 4CAAAC29ABFC1-hidd en4. For more information on “Hidden Durham Tours” and other Preservation Durham events, visit www.preservationdu rham.org. About Preservation Durham: Preservation Durham is a non-profit membership organization dedicated to preserving Durham’s architectural heritage. The organization was founded in 1974, originally as the Historic Preservation Society of Durham. Preservation Durham has worked to establish historic districts in Durham that provide tax credits for homeowners of historic houses. Preservation Durham ’s Endangered Properties Fund helps buyers and sellers of historic properties protect them with preservation covenants. Its Renovators Network provides information and expertise to homeowners and other renovators. For more information visit www.preservationdu rham.org.  (Nov 5, 2013 | post #1)

Duke Blue Devils NCAA Basketball

PRIME Duke vs. Michigan Basketball Tickets To Be Auctione...

-- Four third-row tickets will join the Silent Auction line-up at Preservation Durham’s annual fundraiser -- October 29, 2013 (Durham, NC) -- Tallman Trask, Duke University’s Executive Vice President and a member of the Preservation Durham, Inc., board of directors, is donating his personal set of four tickets to the Duke vs. Michigan University men’s basketball game on December 3 for the Preservation Party fundraiser on November 8 at Morgan Imports in downtown Durham. Free and open to the public, the annual Preservation Party includes a silent auction. Thanks to Trask, the 2013 partygoers will be able to bid on these tickets -- for excellent seats on the third row, on even with Cameron Indoor Stadium’s eastern goal – during the party. The minimum bid will be $2000. According to Ticketnetwork.com, tickets of this type for this game range from $700-$800 each. “We’re delighted and honored by Mr. Trask’s generous donation for seats that would be nearly impossible to get otherwise," said Wendy Hillis, Preservation Durham's Executive Director. "Die-hard Duke fans need to save the date for the Party and try to win those tickets!” Other Duke men’s basketball tickets will be up for auction during the Party without a minimum bid. The Preservation Party is a major, annual fundraiser for Preservation Durham, the non-profit membership organization dedicated to preserving Durham’s architectural heritage. The party will include a variety of foods donated by area restaurants, beverages, live entertainment, the Silent Auction, and shopping at Morgan Imports. All of the proceeds from the auction will benefit Preservation Durham’s efforts and programs. Ten percent of Morgan Import’s sales that evening will also go to Preservation Durham. Morgan Imports is located at 113 South Gregson Street, Durham, NC 27701. For directions visit www.morganimports. com. For more information on the Party and the organization, visit http://preservatio ndurham.org. About Preservation Durham: Preservation Durham is a non-profit membership organization dedicated to preserving Durham’s architectural heritage. The organization was founded in 1974, originally as the Historic Preservation Society of Durham. Preservation Durham has worked to establish historic districts in Durham that provide tax credits for homeowners of historic houses. Preservation Durham ’s Endangered Properties Fund helps buyers and sellers of historic properties protect them with preservation covenants. Its Renovators Network provides information and expertise to homeowners and other renovators. For more information visit www.preservationdu rham.org.  (Oct 30, 2013 | post #1)

Durham, NC

Preservation Durham Welcomes New History Hub To Downtown ...

-- Executive Director Wendy Hillis looks forward to a synergetic relationship -- October 15, 2013 (Durham, NC) – When the new Museum of Durham History -- a.k.a. the Durham History Hub -- opened to the public today at 500 West Main Street, just a few blocks away Preservation Durham’s Executive Director Wendy Hillis could almost hear the coupling between the city’s past and future snap into place. “We are so excited to have the History Hub finally join us downtown, providing an accessible public venue within which to explore the unique history of our city,” she said from Preservation Durham’s office just off Main on Market Street. “With the opening of the Hub, we can focus our work on what we do best: leveraging our historic buildings and neighborhoods through continued renovation and reuse, with the ultimate goal of generating a strong real estate engine, with unique assets, for the future of Durham City and County.” Preservation Durham is a non-profit membership organization dedicated to preserving Durham’s architectural heritage. According to Hillis, the Hub is a natural outgrowth of the role her organization has played in the community since 1974. “So we can be forward looking, advocating for the importance of our historic places in the future of the city,” she said, “while the Hub can look back and interpret the history that brought us to this point. The museum’s opening also allows us to focus more specifically on the future of historic preservation: the revitalization of historic neighborhoods and buildings.” The Hub’s Executive Director Katie Spencer and her Board of Directors, three of whom also serve on Preservation Durham’s Board, have been “great partners over the past few years,” Hillis said. “We look forward to continuing this synergetic relationship. I hope this realignment of our scope will make us more relevant to a larger sector of the population -- those who are drawn to Durham's unique character- - and help us build a support base outside our traditional demographic.” Wendy Hillis joined Preservation Durham in September of 2012 after serving as Campus Historic Preservation Architect at UNC-Chapel Hill. She received her Master of Architecture degree from the University of Virginia and is a past recipient of the prestigious Richard Morris Hunt Fellowship that allows an American preservation architect to study and work in Paris, France. Durham’s History Hub will be open Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m. until 5 p.m., with extended hours on Thursdays and Third Fridays in the spring and summer months. There is no admission fee. For more information on Hub, go to www.museumofdurham history.org/histor y-hub.html. For more information on Preservation Durham, visit preservationdurham .org. About Preservation Durham: Preservation Durham is a non-profit membership organization dedicated to preserving Durham’s architectural heritage. The organization was founded in 1974, originally as the Historic Preservation Society of Durham. Preservation Durham has worked to establish historic districts in Durham that provide tax credits for homeowners of historic houses. Preservation Durham ’s Endangered Properties Fund helps buyers and sellers of historic properties protect them with preservation covenants. Its Renovators Network provides information and expertise to homeowners and other renovators. For more information visit www.preservationdu rham.org.  (Oct 15, 2013 | post #1)

Clemson, SC

Frank Harmon Joins Clemson School of Architecture's Cente...

-- The Raleigh-based architect will use his work to discuss architectural regionalism -- October 8, 2013 (Raleigh, NC) -- Frank Harmon, FAIA, principal of Frank Harmon Architect PA and a Professor In Practice at NC State University’s College of Design, has been asked to speak during the Clemson University School of Architecture’s centennial celebration and symposium in Clemson, SC, in October. The centennial celebration is entitled “The Architecture of Regionalism in the Age of Globalization.” The symposium’s theme is "Southern Roots + Global Reach," which recognizes Clemson’s geography and regionalism, as well as its long tradition of transcending the limits of its geography and region. Frank Harmon is a nationally recognized leader in modern, sustainable, regionally appropriate design, specializing in environmental education centers. Since 2007, he has also presented “Architects Discuss America’s New Regionalism” at national AIA conventions to standing-room-only crowds. On Friday, October 18, Harmon and fellow architects Marlon Blackwell, FAIA, of Fayetteville, Arkansas, and Merrill Elam, FAIA, principal in the Atlanta, Georgia-based firm Mack Scogin Merrill Elam Architects, will each give 30-minute presentations on their work and the symposium’s theme. Harmon’s portion is entitled “Native Places.” Clemson University’s architecture instruction began in 1913. For more information on the centennial and the symposium, go to http://www.clemson .edu/caah/architec ture/celebration/s ymposium. For more information on Frank Harmon, visit www.frankharmon.co m. About Frank Harmon, FAIA: Frank Harmon, FAIA, is principal of the multi-award-winnin g firm Frank Harmon Architect PA in Raleigh, NC, a Professor in Practice at NC State University’s College of Design, and the 2013 winner of AIA North Carolina’s F. Carter Williams Gold Medal, the highest honor presented by the Chapter to an AIA NC member to recognize a distinguished career and extraordinary accomplishments as an architect. . In 1995, he received the North Carolina Architecture Foundation’s Kamphoefner Prize For Distinguished Modern Design Over A Ten-Year Period. In 2005 Residential Architect magazine named his firm Top Firm of The Year. In 2010 Harmon was included in Residential Architect’s inaugural “RA 50: The Short List of Architects We love.” And in 2012, his firm was ranked 17th among the top 50 firms in the nation by Architect Magazine. Frank Harmon is also the author and illustrator for “Native Places,” a new blog in which he uses hand-drawn sketches and mini-essays to examine the relationship between nature and built structures. For more information: www.frankharmon.co m.  (Oct 10, 2013 | post #1)

Greensboro, NC

Greensboro Duo To Hike 500 Miles for People with Disabili...

-- Mom and daughter will walk the ancient Camino de Santiago to raise funds for RHA Howell -- October 2, 2013 (Greensboro, NC) -- On October 30, 2013, Greensboro, NC, mother and daughter Deborah and Brenna Berman will fly to Madrid, Spain, to embark on a grueling 500-mile hike across northern Spain to raise funds for RHA Howell, a state-wide non-profit organization that serves children and adults with disabilities. A Berman family members lives in RHA Howell’s group home in Greensboro. “We have asked friends, family, and the public for donations to RHA Howell,” the Bermans say on their blog, www.trailjournals. com/HikingForHowel l, where anyone interested can follow them on their journey and share their experiences. “A pledge per mile will help this worthy organization. Even as little as a penny per mile, multiplied by 500 miles, equals five bucks.” It will take the mother-daughter team six weeks to hike the Camino de Santiago, or Saint James Way, a pilgrimage route that culminates at the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in Galicia in northwestern Spain. Tradition holds that the remains of the apostle Saint James are buried there. This marks the second time the Bermans have hiked Camino de Santiago. They did so six years ago and remember that “challenging days are inevitable and we will need help to get through them.” They say they found that help by deciding to make this second hike a “Hiking For Howells” fundraiser. “On those inevitable ‘down’ days this fall, knowing our every step counts (literally!) will inspire us,” they say. Debora and Brenna will travel by train and bus from Madrid to a tiny mountain village near the border of France and Spain. From there, they will backpack along the ancient route over four mountain ranges, on muddy trails, and through all kinds of weather. To pledge a donation for the Bermans’ effort, go to www.rhahowell.org/ HikingForHowells.a spx. To share the Bermans’ experiences, visit www.trailjournals. com/HikingForHowel l. For more information on RHA Howell, visit www.rhahowell.org. About RHA Howell: RHA Howell has been providing supports and services to children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for more than 35 years. We work closely with individuals and their families to make their lives as independent as possible with an emphasis on community inclusion. Mrs. Irene Howell founded the original Howell Care Centers in 1970. Over the next 30 years, Mrs. Howell established a network of Howell Care Centers, and upon her retirement, entrusted her legacy to RHA Health Services. Today, RHA Howell, Inc. carries on the Howell Care Centers tradition. For more information: www.rhahowell.org.  (Oct 3, 2013 | post #1)

Durham, NC

Preservation Durham Polls 2013 Candidates, Publishes Results

September 30, 2013 (Durham, NC ) -- Are you a preservation voter? In other words, does a candidate’s attitude towards the preservation or adaptive re-use of your community’s historic properties inform your voting decision? As a non-profit organization, the folks at Preservation Durham can not endorse candidates, but they do want to make sure fellow citizens of the Bull City, who care about preserving Durham’s historic properties, know which candidates among the slate vying for mayor and the City Council share their passion. To that end, Preservation Durham’s Executive Director Wendy Hillis and Preservation Coordinator Elizabeth Marsh created the city’s first official Preservation Voters survey, with the Board of Directors’ support. The survey explores each candidate’s knowledge of, and feelings about, historic preservation and how important it should – or should not – be in city development and growth. They sent it to the candidates at the beginning of September and asked them to return it by October 25. “The survey addresses very important local preservation issues and challenges,” Hillis explained, such as the role the Historic Preservation Commission should play in guiding future growth, whether or not preservation and adaptive re-use should be a central tenet of downtown development, and whether or not the candidate supports the Local Landmark program and expanding historic districts, among other issues. “The questionnaire is designed to provide solid information to voters who care about these issues,” Hillis said. Last week, Elizabeth Marsh published the candidates’ responses verbatim on the Preservation Durham website. At least, she published responses from those who chose to answer the questionnaire. All three mayoral candidates – incumbent Bill Bell, Michael Valentine, and Sylvester Williams -- filled out the survey. Four of the seven candidates for City Council failed to respond at all. “In a city with such a wealth of historic properties, we felt it was vitally important to let voters who care about the historic fabric of their city know how candidates feel about the subject,” Hillis said. “We hope our example will inspire other cities throughout North Carolina to conduct similar surveys when local elections are looming.” Hillis noted that Historic Seattle’s similar effort, launched in 2009, inspired Preservation Durham’s inaugural survey. To read the Durham candidates’ responses to the first Preservation Voters survey, go to http://preservatio ndurham.org/advoca cy/preservation-vo ters/. About Preservation Durham: Preservation Durham is a non-profit membership organization dedicated to preserving Durham’s architectural heritage. The organization was founded in 1974, originally as the Historic Preservation Society of Durham. Preservation Durham has worked to establish historic districts in Durham that provide tax credits for homeowners of historic houses. Preservation Durham ’s Endangered Properties Fund helps buyers and sellers of historic properties protect them with preservation covenants. Its Renovators Network provides information and expertise to homeowners and other renovators. For more information visit www.preservationdu rham.org.  (Sep 30, 2013 | post #1)

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Raleigh, NC

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Downtown Raleigh

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Favorite what? Restaurants? The Pit, Sittee, Gravy, Raleigh Times, Dos Taquitos... too many to list!

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MSNBC

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Anything by Dorothy Benton Frank and Lee Smith

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Carolina Hurricanes and ice hockey in general!

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