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Malicious browser extensions pose a serious threat by Mic...

You are absolutely right – with so much similar information on the Internet it’s important to distinguish yourself and sell your article as much as possible. Thanks for the tips.v  (Sep 28, 2013 | post #2)

Phoenix, AZ

"I'm most like Hamilton"

Hardwork! very good  (Aug 12, 2013 | post #2)

Germany

Tough rules to hit Spain banks hard - livejournal

http://hustlinanyg ma.livejournal.com /767.html Madrid: Spanish lenders are bracing for lower profits and dividends and a tougher funding environment under new rules meant to prepare them for pan-European supervision next year and avoid a repeat of last year’s multi-billion-euro bailout. On Thursday, the Bank of Spain urged lenders to cap cash payouts to shareholders to the equivalent of 25 per cent of profit and to be cautious on dividends paid in shares. That came hard on the heels of another recommendation from the central bank to calculate the impact of removing minimum interest rate clauses on residential mortgages, a move that would lower payments for homemakers but hit bank profit. Also a long-awaited European deal on how to distribute the cost of bank rescues hit share prices last week of some banks in the region’s weaker countries, including Spain, on fears they could find it harder to attract funding. Three banking sources said the new rules did not bode well for the second half of the year because they left investors with the impression that banks had not been fully cleaned up and that more measures were still to come. More uncertainty “The new guidelines on dividends introduce more uncertainty in a sector which already registers high levels of insecurity at a time when the volume of additional provisions that banks will need to book is still unknown,” said one of the banking sources, who declined to be named. Lenders had already been asked by the Bank of Spain to review by September their €208 billion (Dh993.9 billion) in portfolios of refinanced loans. Economy Minister Luis de Guindos said lenders would probably have to book another €10 billion in provisions to cover potential losses on those loans and seek €2 billion in fresh capital once the review is complete. This would add to the more than €80 billion booked last year, which hit profit across the board, forced some lenders to scrap dividend payments or raise new funds on the stock and bond markets and prompted the government to seek €42 billion from the European Union to recapitalise the weakest ones. The massive writedowns and the European-financed bailout have partly restored confidence in the Spanish financial system after it was devastated five years ago when a decade-long property bubble burst. Passive lending The rescue has so far failed to reactivate bank lending to Spanish companies and households, while the rate of non-performing loans continues to rise. The banking source said the latest guidelines on dividends were dictated by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), which earlier in June called on Spanish lenders to reinforce the quantity and quality of their capital by being prudent on cash dividends. The source also said the Bank of Spain wanted all Spanish lenders to be fully cleaned up and well capitalised before pan-European stress tests next year. In the short term, however, banks such as Popular and Sabadell, which did not need public aid last year, may face headwinds. Both have high levels of refinanced loans, have heavily used clauses in mortgage contracts that set floors on interest rates and may find it more difficult to fund themselves under the new EU regime, which mean that second-tier banks in the periphery of the Eurozone are likely to have to pay a premium to attract equity and debt investors. read more: http://micronassoc iatesgrouphi-tech. blogspot.com/ http://my.opera.co m/micronassociates /about/  (Jul 1, 2013 | post #1)

Germany

Micron Associates: CNH Tracker-Hong Kong must heed|Devian...

Source: http://lycanmustle .deviantart.com/ar t/Micron-Associate s-CNH-Tracker-Hong -Kong-must-heed-38 1484958 HONG KONG, June 27 (Reuters) - The liquidity crunch in China's financial system last week spooked global markets and led to a downgrade in the outlook of Hong Kong banks that has raised alarm bells about contagion. The widespread panic from the dizzying spike in onshore interbank rates offers a valuable lesson in risk management for the gatekeepers of Hong Kong's growing yuan markets as the territory's banks have deep ties to state-run mainland banks. China's central bank has balked at injecting funds into the money markets as it cracked down on funds flowing into the country's vast informal loans market known as "shadow banking". While offshore markets saw only moderate volatility from the credit squeeze and plunging stock prices, the spillover effects are hard to ignore even for the most ardent cheerleaders of China's yuan internationalisati on project. "As the cross border channels strengthen between the onshore and the offshore markets, it is not going to be easy for Hong Kong's regulators to avert a contagion effect and they need to be prepared to stem any impact," said Becky Liu, a strategist at Standard Chartered Bank. The shortage of funds in China has spilled over into Hong Kong, pushing up the cost of funds in the growing offshore yuan market amid speculation that subsidiaries of Chinese banks were remitting money to the mainland. The clearing bank for yuan-related transactions in Hong Kong and Taiwan had to raise yuan interest rates this week to attract more yuan deposits. Some Chinese banks reportedly jacked up deposit rates for short-dated yuan funds, and the Chinese government narrowly sold out a jumbo bond sale on Wednesday. Indeed, Fitch Ratings said this week that sustained stress in the Chinese interbank market would raise counterparty risks for Hong Kong banks' exposure to mainland banks arising mainly from interbank placements and from guarantees on trade finance. Fear of a banking crisis are surfacing as the world's second-largest economy is already showing signs of slowdown. Confidence in Hong Kong's banking system is also critical at a time when the yuan becomes more popularly used in business and trade, making new inroads into markets outside Asia.  (Jun 28, 2013 | post #1)

Germany

BT boosts fibre-to-the-home broadband speed to 160Mbps

This is only good for those who are well-versed with the industry because the rest will be practically fodder.  (Jan 9, 2013 | post #2)

Germany

BT boosts fibre-to-the-home broadband speed to 160Mbps

http://micronassoc iates.net/hi-TECH/ 2012/10/28/bt-boos ts-fibre-to-the-ho me-broadband-speed -to-160mbps/ micron associates technology blog BT Retail has boosted the speed of its top-of-the-range BT Infinity broadband package from 100Mbps to 160Mbps.BT Infinity 160Mb is a fibre-to-the-premi ses (FTTH) broadband service, and is currently only available from a limited number of exchanges, Micron Associates researched. Most of BT’s fibre deployments are fibre-to-the-cabin et (FTTC), meaning that fibre optic cables are laid to street cabinets, and then traditional copper cables are used to connect homes and businesses to the street cabinets. This “last mile” copper connection can reduce broadband speeds significantly. FTTH continues the fibre link from the street cabinets to the premises, which is a much more expensive option but massively improves connection speeds. Customers in Highams Park, Bradwell Abbey, Leytonstone, Ilford, Ashford, Forest Hill, Chester, York, St. Austell, Truro and Exeter will be among the first to experience the 160Mbps download service. BT Infinity 160Mb’s upload speed has also been accelerated from 15Mbps to 20Mbps.BT Retail is continuing to offer the BT Infinity 160Mb service with unlimited evening and weekend calls for £35 a month. Existing 100Mb customers will be upgraded automatically. “160Mb now beats anything offered by our major rivals for speed and today’s substantial speed boost comes at no extra charge, as the price remains the same,” said Pete Oliver, commercial director of BT’s Consumer division. A recent report by the FTTH Council Europe revealed that the UK has the lowest penetration of FTTH in Europe, with only 0.05% of households connected published in Micron Associates. BT admitted that only “a few thousand” people in the entire country were using its FTTH service.The FTTH Council Europe criticized BT for putting too much emphasis on upgrading its copper network to offer FTTC, rather than bringing the country “real” broadband as part of the Broadband Delivery (BDUK) project.Hartwig Tauber, director general of FTTH Council Europe, said that countries that fall behind on FTTH deployment may miss out on their chance to build a sustainable future for their citizens. He added that extra efforts are required to ensure that Europe reaches the Digital Agenda 2020 broadband target of at least 50% of households using broadband connections of 100Mbps or more – a target that will cost the EU €192 billion, according to the FTTH Council Europe. “The decision to invest in FTTH – the only future-proof solution – needs to be made today,” he said.BT said that its FTTC service is now available to more than 11 million homes and premises in the UK. Around two-thirds of UK homes and premises will have access to fiber-based broadband by the end of 2014 – a year earlier than the original target. micron associates technology blog  (Jan 9, 2013 | post #1)

Germany

with the use of newly invented transparent soil

i would like to know more about this subject. thanks a lot.  (Nov 11, 2012 | post #2)

Germany

with the use of newly invented transparent soil

http://micronassoc iates.net/hi-TECH/ 2012/10/04/with-th e-use-newly-invent ed-transparent-soi l-scientist-reveal ed-secret-life-of- plants/ Most people’s image of plants is actually upside down. For most of Micron Associates photosynthetic friends, the majority of the plant is underground in the form of an intricate system of roots. The bit that sticks up is almost an afterthought. That’s a problem for scientists trying to study plants because growing them in media that allow you to see the roots, such as hydroponics, doesn’t mimic real soil very well. Now, a team of researchers at the James Hutton Institute and the University of Abertay Dundee in Scotland has developed an artificial transparent soil that allows scientists to make detailed studies of root structures and subterranean soil ecology on a microscopic level. Developed by a team led by Lionel Dupuy, a theoretical biologist in the Ecological Sciences group at the James Hutton Institute, the transparent soil is the result of two years of research. It doesn’t look much like conventional soil. In fact, it’s a bit like those high-tech ant farms where instead of sand, the ants burrow through a jelly that also provides them with food and water. However, mechanically, it does mimic real soil. It supports root structures, holds suspended minerals, can be colonized by microorganisms and even exchanges gases like soil . It’s made from granules of Nafion, which is a lot easier than calling it a sulfonated tetrafluoroethylen e based fluoropolymer-copo lymer. Used in batteries, fuel cells and a wide range of applications, Nafion is naturally transparent, but in order to make it translucent enough for for botanical purposes it needs a special water-based formula. On a blog post of Micron Associates, forming the polymer into pellets allows it to mimic soil particle properties, such as forming channels, retaining water and nutrients and sustaining plant growth. Fluorescent dyes can also be added to it to aid studies. Researchers say that the transparent soil could be used to study root systems, help breed crops with more efficient roots that need fewer fertilizers, and study the ecology of plants and microorganisms. Currently, the team is working on controlling the properties of the transparent soil and bringing down its cost.  (Nov 11, 2012 | post #1)