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Connecticut Post

DCF chief asks deal on DUI charge

hun I am from connecticut born and raised my whole family is there. I can not advise you on this thats why I left the message the person sent in . those are the people you need to talk to . they i gather are taking peoples stories and problems cps and bringing into one a law suite and before law makers. Since I don't live there And am not directly involved with with what they are doing I can not help you . they are the ones who know the inner working of there organization. I only passed the message on  (Mar 22, 2009 | post #30)

Connecticut Post

Man charged in sex assault

FYI The General Assembly is holding investigative hearings into DCF following the May death of Michael B., a 7-month-old boy in the care of Suzanne Listro, a DCF employee who'd been investigated twice for abusing her own children. Baby Michael died from blunt force trauma to the head and Listro is now facing a manslaughter charge. Although DCF has made improvements, Milstein says, good leadership could have prevented the death of Michael B. by fixing the decade-long practice of not documenting abuse allegations against DCF employees. During five hours of questioning in Hartford last week, DCF Commissioner Susan Hamilton repeatedly told a panel of state legislators that things are going "great" or "well" despite reports to the contrary. In a few areas, she admitted, "we could do better." They could do a lot better. The federal government has threatened to put DCF into receivership for taking too long to comply with a court order stemming from a class-action lawsuit (it's been nearly 20 years). Milstein has documented numerous cases of abuse, neglect and mismanagement at DCF facilities and a legislative report from 2007 slammed the agency for a lack of quality control. "This department has been bombasted by the courts, the federal government and their clients, and they sit here and say they're doing great? That's baloney," says state Sen. Ed Meyer, a Branford Democrat who heads the legislature's Select Committee on Children. Lawmakers are considering forcing the agency to reorganize top-to-bottom (DCF has proposed their own, less rigorous reorganization with little input from legislators). The investigative hearings are a first step toward reforming the agency. Legislators are using the hearings to gather ideas about what needs to be changed. Attorney General Richard Blumenthal and Milstein have suggested a comprehensive outside review, rethinking DCF's core structure and a "complete overhaul" of existing management. Hamilton told legislators she'd welcome an outside review but bristled at changing management. "If it means get rid of the old and bring in the new, then no," she said. Asked which branch of her department was functioning the best, she replied: "I think they're all working." But lawmakers are skeptical that everything's working, and state Rep. Karen Jarmoc (D-Enfield) pressed Hamilton on a situation some of her constituents found themselves in: An aunt and uncle in northern Connecticut wanted to adopt their niece, who'd been placed in foster care after her parents were sent to jail. The aunt and uncle, who already had four children of their own, at first declined to take in their niece. Months later they reconsidered, but DCF told them it was too late — the girl would be adopted by another family who didn't want her biological family to have contact. "If DCF's mission is to preserve the family unit, how do things like this happen?" Jarmoc questioned Hamilton. We're doing what's best for the child, said Hamilton, and sometimes there's disagreement about what that is. "The result of these irreparable, permanent actions of DCF is that a little girl is going to grow up thinking her family doesn't want her," Jarmoc fumed. "She's going to grow up without her brother, without her family. This is a permanent impact on a child, on a family and I'm making it my goal to make sure these things don't continue to happen in our state."  (Mar 22, 2009 | post #120)

Connecticut Post

DCF chief asks deal on DUI charge

this was taken from the net The General Assembly is holding investigative hearings into DCF following the May death of Michael B., a 7-month-old boy in the care of Suzanne Listro, a DCF employee who'd been investigated twice for abusing her own children. Baby Michael died from blunt force trauma to the head and Listro is now facing a manslaughter charge. Although DCF has made improvements, Milstein says, good leadership could have prevented the death of Michael B. by fixing the decade-long practice of not documenting abuse allegations against DCF employees. During five hours of questioning in Hartford last week, DCF Commissioner Susan Hamilton repeatedly told a panel of state legislators that things are going "great" or "well" despite reports to the contrary. In a few areas, she admitted, "we could do better." They could do a lot better. The federal government has threatened to put DCF into receivership for taking too long to comply with a court order stemming from a class-action lawsuit (it's been nearly 20 years). Milstein has documented numerous cases of abuse, neglect and mismanagement at DCF facilities and a legislative report from 2007 slammed the agency for a lack of quality control. "This department has been bombasted by the courts, the federal government and their clients, and they sit here and say they're doing great? That's baloney," says state Sen. Ed Meyer, a Branford Democrat who heads the legislature's Select Committee on Children. Lawmakers are considering forcing the agency to reorganize top-to-bottom (DCF has proposed their own, less rigorous reorganization with little input from legislators). The investigative hearings are a first step toward reforming the agency. Legislators are using the hearings to gather ideas about what needs to be changed. Attorney General Richard Blumenthal and Milstein have suggested a comprehensive outside review, rethinking DCF's core structure and a "complete overhaul" of existing management. Hamilton told legislators she'd welcome an outside review but bristled at changing management. "If it means get rid of the old and bring in the new, then no," she said. Asked which branch of her department was functioning the best, she replied: "I think they're all working." But lawmakers are skeptical that everything's working, and state Rep. Karen Jarmoc (D-Enfield) pressed Hamilton on a situation some of her constituents found themselves in: An aunt and uncle in northern Connecticut wanted to adopt their niece, who'd been placed in foster care after her parents were sent to jail. The aunt and uncle, who already had four children of their own, at first declined to take in their niece. Months later they reconsidered, but DCF told them it was too late — the girl would be adopted by another family who didn't want her biological family to have contact. "If DCF's mission is to preserve the family unit, how do things like this happen?" Jarmoc questioned Hamilton. We're doing what's best for the child, said Hamilton, and sometimes there's disagreement about what that is. "The result of these irreparable, permanent actions of DCF is that a little girl is going to grow up thinking her family doesn't want her," Jarmoc fumed. "She's going to grow up without her brother, without her family. This is a permanent impact on a child, on a family and I'm making it my goal to make sure these things don't continue to happen in our state."  (Mar 22, 2009 | post #29)

Connecticut Post

DCF chief asks deal on DUI charge

they will explain it to you . I really dont know what your asking. but there are several investigations going on. If you had a problem with dcf or a foster home ever . I belive they are filing a class action law suit  (Mar 22, 2009 | post #26)

Connecticut Post

Cops: Woman saved from heroin OD

what a cruel thing to say. oh just tell everyone . what are you trying to do get the girl killed. you are nuts. and almost threating this poor girl  (Mar 22, 2009 | post #120)

Connecticut Post

Cops: Woman saved from heroin OD

well she sounds a awful like someone in the field. by her remark of once a addict couple always a addict couple. and very judgemental isnr she. she needs a little attitude adjustment and get off her high horse  (Mar 22, 2009 | post #119)

Connecticut Post

Cops: Woman saved from heroin OD

oh if it only where that easy . wake up buddy  (Mar 22, 2009 | post #118)

Connecticut Post

Cops: Woman saved from heroin OD

everything on the computer is traceable take this to a lawyer who can find out for you. if this person really works at a clinic you go to. you got a great law suit  (Mar 22, 2009 | post #117)

Connecticut Post

Cops: Woman saved from heroin OD

if its someone that works at a clinic you go to you can sue that clinic  (Mar 22, 2009 | post #116)

Connecticut Post

Cops: Woman saved from heroin OD

what the hell is wrong with you. the girl is ill  (Mar 22, 2009 | post #115)

Connecticut Post

Cops: Woman saved from heroin OD

do not judge till you have walked in her shoes. Dam how can you talk like that to someone by the sound of it you know. and someone who dam near died. I heard of tuff love but dam. have some compassion. I dont belive she is happy with herself or her problem. I am happy she is alive and i am sure her family is also. would you go to her funeral and say those things at her grave  (Mar 22, 2009 | post #114)

Connecticut Post

Cops: Woman saved from heroin OD

Sweet heart bless you . I will pray for you. you are in my heart. please please get well  (Mar 22, 2009 | post #113)

Connecticut Post

Cops: Woman saved from heroin OD

i agree except methadone just replaces the heroin. people actually sell and buy methadone. its just replacing one addiction with another. Just pray for her recovery . she may see the light. I wish they would use methadone . just becaue they legal give it doesnt make less dangerious  (Mar 22, 2009 | post #112)

Connecticut Post

Cops: Woman saved from heroin OD

because it kills people . if it where legal they all would die. alchol in my opion should be delegalized. it ruins more familys and lives  (Mar 22, 2009 | post #111)

Connecticut Post

Cops: Woman saved from heroin OD

it means they are not suppose to have access to let alone print any personal medical records. the hospital is not to give out information about you. so they can be sued I dont know about the paper that printed it. I wouldnt think so. but the hospital and any medical profession can not give out any medical information on anyone with permission from the person receiving it  (Mar 22, 2009 | post #110)