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Jun 11, 2013

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Yet another confusing website

This website is really making my head ache. Maybe this alone can sum up how much I am disappointed wasting my time reading on your articles and spending time trying to convince myself that I could see something that will somehow make sense in this website. But here I am I ended up writing this review so no one else will waste time reading on you. Yes you are a total waste. See, I am very grateful that you have very good intensions in starting a website with this kind of topic. It is impressive that you are concern and I believe we have the same vision with regards helping mother earth and saving our environment but this website seems to appear that it wasn’t thought of very well. It is disorganize, you make people heads ache, no one will be interested reading your articles if you cannot even pull off a pleasing website. It is not as if we are going to exert so much effort just so we can read your articles. And if we do, like I did, what do we get? Disappointment. Do not even make me start criticizing your articles. I admire the guts though but still wasn’t enough. You make my OCD attack. Yeah, c’mon like seriously. Why are your articles all over the place? I cannot understand it, I don’t know which is which. I was reading this topic then suddenly I am lost with another topic. You are definitely confusing your readers. Place your articles in one category and organize it according to topics. And please keep them up-to-date. Most of your articles are outdated. And I think they are all not originals, most of them I already seen on other websites. Why would you even start your own site if you do not even know the things to input in it. You are just wasting your time and our time. I love reading, I love it, whether it e books or articles from the internet or sometimes even random stuff but you made me hate reading for the first time. Are these articles really from you? Because I think you have more studying to do. Here is piece of advice, I am not an expert but I am your market so I think it is wise you listen to your market, wear the shoes of your market and know what they want and what would appeal to them. Your style is simply confusing and stressing. We are not going to spend time trying to figure out what you mean so be straight to the point and simple. Unlike your site that is flowery and confusing. Good luck on improving your site. IMPROVE YOUR SITE ===&#61672; >>>> http://www.thecrow nmanagement.com <<<< &#61671;===  (Oct 7, 2013 | post #1)

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Environmental Justice and the Structure of Human Rights J...

Environmental Justice and the Structure of Human Rights JAKARTA http://jakartacrow necomanagement.blo gspot.com/2013/07/ environmental-just ice-and-structure- of.html In a very basic way, Environmental Justice is about the intersection of human rights, infrastructure and how people–rich and poor, living in rich or developing countries–equitabl y and sustainably access the resources and things they need to survive and prosper. Robert Bullard, an environmental sociologist and Dean of the Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University, is passionate about the human side of Environmental Justice and “unequal” environmental protection. “Environmental Justice embraces the principle that people and communities are entitled to equal protection of our environment, health, employment, education, housing, transportation and civil rights laws….Environmenta l Justice brings it all together under one tent.” The Environmental Justice movement has grown both in public awareness, attitudes and action since the signing of Executive Order 12898 in 1994. Progress has been made, but is it a success? President Clinton’s order was 20 years ago, and the question remains whether EJ today is more than a finger in the dyke in the face of forces such as the House of Representatives members who would like to dismantle the Environmental Protection Agency, or countries and companies bent on the privatization of water. Many programs to improve communities focus on small issues like bike paths, parks and sidewalks, but we still plan to send hundreds of coal export trains through low income communities and site landfills in them. A major question facing people who live on the “other side of the tracks” — places where landfills, water treatment plants, chemical plants and refineries tend to be located — is if the Environmental Justice movement is real and effective. The results are mixed, because as Bullard says, “there is always the other side of the tracks” for the elderly, the poor, the disabled, the homeless and those without access to cars or to transit systems. Poor communities wind up with a “disproportionate share of the bad stuff and a shortage of libraries, sidewalks, parks and greenspace.” Sustainable communities Sustainable communities mean lower transportation costs, reduced air pollution and stormwater runoff, decreased infrastructure costs, less time spent in cars and preservation of historic properties and sensitive lands. However, these benefits are difficult to enact at the systemic level and are always at risk of budgetary cuts. For example, a recent Congressional budget measure proposes to end all funding for the Partnership for Sustainable Communities, a program that unifies three federal departments (EPA, the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Department of Transportation) and funding resources around sustainable community development projects including transportation, affordable housing, and community development. All forward progress of this initiative would halt due to a Congress focused on the short-term. Source: http://ishare.redi ff.com/video/enter tainment/crown-eco -capital-jakarta-f raud-management-so lutions-cover-stor y-jakarta-races-ah ead-despite-challe nges/8748469 http://www.thestud entroom.co.uk/show thread.php?t=23012 80  (Jul 8, 2013 | post #1)

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Jakarta environmental issues crown eco management

Chinese demand for dairy products has a big environmental impact on California Jakarta environmental issues crown eco management http://www.dropjac k.com/Environment/ jakarta-environmen tal-issues-crown-e co-management-by-~ panainn-on-deviant art-1/ A growing demand for milk and cheese in China has the potential to bring California's beleaguered dairy industry back to life --- and with it, renewed concern about its damaging effects on the environment. As China's middle class grows, so does its penchant for dairy products such as milk, cheese and yogurt. U.S. government data show that Chinese demand for dairy products is growing rapidly. For instance, between 2011 and 2012, imports of skimmed milk powder grew by 49 percent and are expected to increase an additional 18 percent this year. And although China is trying to build its nascent dairy industry to meet this demand, it relies heavily on imports of high-protein feed. That includes one of California's most water-intensive crops, alfalfa. "Exports (of alfalfa) to China are definitely increasing," said Daniel Putnam, an agronomist at the University of California, Davis. "We've seen a pretty dramatic rise since 2006, and I think all expectations are that it will probably increase again this year." But this news, and the already-documented toll California's large dairy farms are having on air and water quality in the Central Valley, is making many environmentalists nervous. "Definitely, there's a carrying capacity for dairy, and it's air quality," said Brent Newell, legal director for the Center on Race, Poverty & the Environment, an environmental justice organization that focuses mostly on the San Joaquin Valley. "You can't keep sticking more dairies in the San Joaquin Valley in order to export cheese to China." California is the nation's largest dairy-producing state with nearly 42 billion pounds of milk produced in 2011, or 21 percent of the nation's total milk output, according to the Dairy Institute of California's most recent economic report in 2012. That success has been attributed largely to the state's model for dairy farming, which maximizes the number of cattle per farm while minimizing the need for on-site food production. "The traditional dairy farm model in the rest of the country is one where dairy farmers grow a considerable amount of their own feed," said Bill Schiek, an economist with the Dairy Institute, a dairy processors trade group. In California, he said, dairy operators don't grow grain or hay on-site but bring it in. "It's a very specialized operation." http://www.ebaumsw orld.com/blogs/vie w/83295967/ http://www.shelfar i.com/groups/10139 4/discussions/4783 64/Crown-Capital-M anagement-Environm ental-News  (Jun 20, 2013 | post #1)