Marijuana Debate - New York, NY

Discuss the national Marijuana debate in New York, NY.

Do you support the legalization of Marijuana?

New York supports
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13

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Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#156 Feb 23, 2012
Considering that my son has a longstanding crush on Cheech and Chong and regularly refers to them as "my homies," I thought there was a fair chance that he would someday say, "I smoke pot." But my kid is only 7 years old. I figured I had a few years before we crossed that threshold (if we ever did), probably when he was 14 or 15. I never thought it would happen this soon.
Six months ago "pot" wasn't even a word in my son's vocabulary. He has always known that some of our male friends smoked a little on the side and some of our female friends do also, and it is such a normal part of his life that he never needed a special word to describe it. When he did notice the word and asked what it meant, I told him that when boys want to relax after a hard day at works and girls want to releave some menstrual pain, they all go out on the back porch and light up a bowl of pot.He didn't seem very interested and quickly went off to do something else more exciting than a vocabulary lesson with his mom.
Fast-forward a few months. I was on the phone with a relative who had just discovered that I was blogging on The Huffington Post and openly discussing my son's crush on Skunk #!. I was in another room alone (I thought), explaining, "We're not saying he's straight, and we're not saying he's going to get stoned. We're saying we love who he is," when my son's voice piped up behind me.
"Yes, I am," he said.
"Am what, baby?" I asked.
"I'm gonna get stoned. I'm a pothead."
My world paused for a moment, and I saw the "geez, Mom, didn't you know that already?" look on my son's face.
I got off the phone and leaned down to eye level with him and rubbed my nose against his. "I love you so much."
"I know," he said, and ran off to play with his brothers.
Since that day, any time the word "pot" has come into conversation, he has happily announced to those around him, "I'm a pothead!" He says this very naturally and happily, the same way he announces other things that he likes about himself. Mention that a person is tall and he'll quickly add, "I'm tall!" If he hears the word "Legos," barely a second passes before he says, "Legos. I love Legos." Saying "I'm a pothead" is his way of telling people: this is something I like about myself.
It's amazing, but it's also shocking. How many people have a 7-year-old come out to them? A lot of people don't know how to react, and I don't blame them. Before my son, I'd never met a child who came out this young -- and we don't know anyone else who has. The mere idea of children having a smoking preference makes people uncomfortable. It's something we don't think about (or just don't like to).
But here's the thing: straight children have nothing to announce. Straight is the assumption. No one bats an eye at a little girl with a Justin Bieber poster in her bedroom, or when little girls love playing wedding with little boys every chance they get. If our marijuana smoking is simply part of who we are, why wouldn't it be there in our elementary years?
I've heard from countless adults who say they knew that they wanted to smoke marijuana as young as kindergarten but lacked the language to talk about it. And in most cases, they knew it was something wrong that they should hide. Because stoner's are part of my son's everyday life, he has the vocabulary, and it has never occurred to him there is anything wrong with it.
On one occasion after an "I'm a pothead" announcement, I watched my husband reach out to ruffle our son's hair. "I know, buddy," my husband said to him. "And you're awesome, too,i'll meet you on the back porch when your mom goes to bed." That's how we're handling it. We want him to know we hear him, and that he's wonderful. It feels like the right thing to do, and that's all we have to go by. We don't have any other examples.

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#157 Feb 23, 2012
We did take a few extra steps. Within a few days we had a quick talk with him about how some people don't like it when people are potsmokers, explaining that those people are wrong. If he hears anyone says anything about being potsmoking like it is something bad, he is to run and get us immediately. We had a brief conversation with his teachers: Our son is identifying as potsmoker. We don't think there's anything wrong with that or with him. And this is the only acceptable opinion on the subject. All his teachers, while surprised, were on board. We learned that he hasn't used that word at school yet, so we'll cross that bridge when the time comes.
I don't think it will always be easy. We don't know what to expect. At this point we aren't looking for trouble, but at the same time we're preparing for it. We know we have a journey ahead of us, just like everyone does. And this is one part of the story of our son and our family.
Do I think this is the last word on his orientation? I don't know. He's 7. Maybe as he gets older he'll tell me something else, but it's just as likely that he won't. But really, that doesn't even matter. What matters is right now. And right now I have a young son who happily announces "I'm a potsmoker." And I'm so proud to be his mom.I hung a poster of a blunt on his bedroom wall.....

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#158 Feb 23, 2012
Considering that my son has a longstanding crush on Chech and Chong and regularly refers to them as "my homies," I thought there was a fair chance that he would someday say, "I'm a stoner." But my kid is only 7 years old. I figured I had a few years before we crossed that threshold (if we ever did), probably when he was 14 or 15. I never thought it would happen this soon.

Six months ago "stoner" wasn't even a word in my son's vocabulary. He has always known that some of our male friends are like to puff a joint and some of our female friends do also, and it is such a normal part of his life that he never needed a special word to describe them. When he did notice the word and asked what it meant, I told him that when boys want to relax after work and girls want to releave menstrual pain, we call that "tok'in." He didn't seem very interested and quickly went off to do something else more exciting than a vocabulary lesson with his mom.

Fast-forward a few months. I was on the phone with a relative who had just discovered that I was blogging on The Huffington Post and openly discussing my son's fixation on Cheech. I was in another room alone (I thought), explaining, "We're not saying he's straight, and we're not saying he's a stoner. We're saying we love who he is," when my son's voice piped up behind me.

"Yes, I am," he said.

"Am what, baby?" I asked.

"Stoner. I'm a stoner."

My world paused for a moment, and I saw the "geez, Mom, didn't you know that already?" look on my son's face.

I got off the phone and leaned down to eye level with him and rubbed my nose against his. "I love you so much."

"I know," he said, and ran off to play with his brothers.

Since that day, any time the word "pothead" has come into conversation, he has happily announced to those around him, "I'm a pothead!" He says this very naturally and happily, the same way he announces other things that he likes about himself. Mention that a person is tall and he'll quickly add, "I'm tall!" If he hears the word "Legos," barely a second passes before he says, "Legos. I love Legos." Saying "I'm gay" is his way of telling people: this is something I like about myself.

It's amazing, but it's also shocking. How many people have a 7-year-old come out to them? A lot of people don't know how to react, and I don't blame them. Before my son, I'd never met a child who came out this young -- and we don't know anyone else who has. The mere idea of children having a marijuana break makes people uncomfortable. It's something we don't think about (or just don't like to).

But here's the thing: straight children have nothing to announce. Straight is the assumption. No one bats an eye at a little girl with a Justin Bieber poster in her bedroom, or when little girls love playing wedding with little boys every chance they get. If our personal preferences is simply part of who we are, why wouldn't it be there in our elementary years?

I've heard from countless adults who say they knew that they were stoner's as young as kindergarten but lacked the language to talk about it. And in most cases, they knew it was something wrong that they should hide. Because stoner people are part of my son's everyday life, he has the vocabulary, and it has never occurred to him there is anything wrong with it.

On one occasion after an "I'm pothead" announcement, I watched my husband reach out to ruffle our son's hair. "I know, buddy," my husband said to him. "And you're awesome, too,I'll meet you on the porch after dinner." That's how we're handling it. We want him to know we hear him, and that he's wonderful. It feels like the right thing to do, and that's all we have to go by. We don't have any other examples.
stings when i pee

New Roads, LA

#159 Feb 23, 2012
ugh dude, like am i suppose to read all that?

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#160 Feb 23, 2012
stings when i pee wrote:
ugh dude, like am i suppose to read all that?
"Man, if you had a second brain, it would die of loneliness, man."

Since: Mar 12

Pleasantville, NJ

#162 Mar 7, 2012
I supply potent medical grade weed via mailorder.Only genuine enquires please.contact on carloslopez@tormail.net
Jack Webb

London, UK

#163 Mar 7, 2012
carloslopez wrote:
I supply potent medical grade weed via mailorder.Only genuine enquires please.contact on carloslopez@tormail.net
Reported. My FBI friends were quite interested.

Do you accept PayPal? How fast can you deliver?
Just Saying

Mineola, NY

#164 Mar 7, 2012
plottmasteram wrote:
Considering that my son has a longstanding crush on Chech and Chong and regularly refers to them as "my homies," I thought there was a fair chance that he would someday say, "I'm a stoner." But my kid is only 7 years old. I figured I had a few years before we crossed that threshold (if we ever did), probably when he was 14 or 15. I never thought it would happen this soon.
Six months ago "stoner" wasn't even a word in my son's vocabulary. He has always known that some of our male friends are like to puff a joint and some of our female friends do also, and it is such a normal part of his life that he never needed a special word to describe them. When he did notice the word and asked what it meant, I told him that when boys want to relax after work and girls want to releave menstrual pain, we call that "tok'in." He didn't seem very interested and quickly went off to do something else more exciting than a vocabulary lesson with his mom.
Fast-forward a few months. I was on the phone with a relative who had just discovered that I was blogging on The Huffington Post and openly discussing my son's fixation on Cheech. I was in another room alone (I thought), explaining, "We're not saying he's straight, and we're not saying he's a stoner. We're saying we love who he is," when my son's voice piped up behind me.
"Yes, I am," he said.
"Am what, baby?" I asked.
"Stoner. I'm a stoner."
My world paused for a moment, and I saw the "geez, Mom, didn't you know that already?" look on my son's face.
I got off the phone and leaned down to eye level with him and rubbed my nose against his. "I love you so much."
"I know," he said, and ran off to play with his brothers.
Since that day, any time the word "pothead" has come into conversation, he has happily announced to those around him, "I'm a pothead!" He says this very naturally and happily, the same way he announces other things that he likes about himself. Mention that a person is tall and he'll quickly add, "I'm tall!" If he hears the word "Legos," barely a second passes before he says, "Legos. I love Legos." Saying "I'm gay" is his way of telling people: this is something I like about myself.
It's amazing, but it's also shocking. How many people have a 7-year-old come out to them? A lot of people don't know how to react, and I don't blame them. Before my son, I'd never met a child who came out this young -- and we don't know anyone else who has. The mere idea of children having a marijuana break makes people uncomfortable. It's something we don't think about (or just don't like to).
But here's the thing: straight children have nothing to announce. Straight is the assumption. No one bats an eye at a little girl with a Justin Bieber poster in her bedroom, or when little girls love playing wedding with little boys every chance they get. If our personal preferences is simply part of who we are, why wouldn't it be there in our elementary years?
I've heard from countless adults who say they knew that they were stoner's as young as kindergarten but lacked the language to talk about it. And in most cases, they knew it was something wrong that they should hide. Because stoner people are part of my son's everyday life, he has the vocabulary, and it has never occurred to him there is anything wrong with it.
On one occasion after an "I'm pothead" announcement, I watched my husband reach out to ruffle our son's hair. "I know, buddy," my husband said to him. "And you're awesome, too,I'll meet you on the porch after dinner." That's how we're handling it. We want him to know we hear him, and that he's wonderful. It feels like the right thing to do, and that's all we have to go by. We don't have any other examples.
I hope this post is a joke. If not, there is something very wrong with you, because this is extremely disturbing on many levels.

“Stupidity Leak”

Since: Sep 11

Woodsboro

#165 Mar 11, 2012
Jack Webb wrote:
<quoted text>
Reported. My FBI friends were quite interested.
Do you accept PayPal? How fast can you deliver?
fun crusher
Teddy R

Abu Dhabi, UAE

#167 Mar 26, 2012
GreenGenie422 wrote:
Please help us in the UK by signing up for this petition.
Thanks guys
http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/29
You don't think the Home Office will pay any attention to signatures from people who aren't UK citizens, do you?

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#168 Mar 27, 2012
"I hope this post is a joke. If not, there is something very wrong with you, because this is extremely disturbing on many levels".
It was a joke and a satire on my "7yo child is gay"Huffington post spread...
Huffington post did not like my joke and they have banned me from posting on their web site permantetly
I let them know it was child abuse for a parent to push a sexual identity with manipulation on a 7 yo who stated I'm gay and the parent who ran down to their school to tell the teachers" My 7yo son is identifying with being gay"
All i did from their article is take out Gay and added marijuana connotations...
You should look up the article,,it is a disturbing peice of media manipulation...

“Dum Di Dum”

Since: Oct 09

Location hidden

#169 Mar 27, 2012
plottmasteram wrote:
Considering that my son has a longstanding crush on Chech and Chong and regularly refers to them as "my homies," I thought there was a fair chance that he would someday say, "I'm a stoner." But my kid is only 7 years old. I figured I had a few years before we crossed that threshold (if we ever did), probably when he was 14 or 15. I never thought it would happen this soon.
Six months ago "stoner" wasn't even a word in my son's vocabulary. He has always known that some of our male friends are like to puff a joint and some of our female friends do also, and it is such a normal part of his life that he never needed a special word to describe them. When he did notice the word and asked what it meant, I told him that when boys want to relax after work and girls want to releave menstrual pain, we call that "tok'in." He didn't seem very interested and quickly went off to do something else more exciting than a vocabulary lesson with his mom.
Fast-forward a few months. I was on the phone with a relative who had just discovered that I was blogging on The Huffington Post and openly discussing my son's fixation on Cheech. I was in another room alone (I thought), explaining, "We're not saying he's straight, and we're not saying he's a stoner. We're saying we love who he is," when my son's voice piped up behind me.
"Yes, I am," he said.
"Am what, baby?" I asked.
"Stoner. I'm a stoner."
My world paused for a moment, and I saw the "geez, Mom, didn't you know that already?" look on my son's face.
I got off the phone and leaned down to eye level with him and rubbed my nose against his. "I love you so much."
"I know," he said, and ran off to play with his brothers.
Since that day, any time the word "pothead" has come into conversation, he has happily announced to those around him, "I'm a pothead!" He says this very naturally and happily, the same way he announces other things that he likes about himself. Mention that a person is tall and he'll quickly add, "I'm tall!" If he hears the word "Legos," barely a second passes before he says, "Legos. I love Legos." Saying "I'm gay" is his way of telling people: this is something I like about myself.
It's amazing, but it's also shocking. How many people have a 7-year-old come out to them? A lot of people don't know how to react, and I don't blame them. Before my son, I'd never met a child who came out this young -- and we don't know anyone else who has. The mere idea of children having a marijuana break makes people uncomfortable. It's something we don't think about (or just don't like to).
But here's the thing: straight children have nothing to announce. Straight is the assumption. No one bats an eye at a little girl with a Justin Bieber poster in her bedroom, or when little girls love playing wedding with little boys every chance they get. If our personal preferences is simply part of who we are, why wouldn't it be there in our elementary years?
I've heard from countless adults who say they knew that they were stoner's as young as kindergarten but lacked the language to talk about it. And in most cases, they knew it was something wrong that they should hide. Because stoner people are part of my son's everyday life, he has the vocabulary, and it has never occurred to him there is anything wrong with it.
On one occasion after an "I'm pothead" announcement, I watched my husband reach out to ruffle our son's hair. "I know, buddy," my husband said to him. "And you're awesome, too,I'll meet you on the porch after dinner." That's how we're handling it. We want him to know we hear him, and that he's wonderful. It feels like the right thing to do, and that's all we have to go by. We don't have any other examples.
Thanks for the good laugh!
Nicholas R

Brooklyn, NY

#173 Jan 7, 2013
It's people's right to use what they think helps them the best. Live free
ThomasA

Birmingham, AL

#174 Jan 7, 2013
Nicholas R wrote:
It's people's right to use what they think helps them the best. Live free
It's also your right to man-up and take the consequences for getting caught whether it be a DUI or a job termination without the usual stoner whining and snivelling.
Arlene Williams

New York, NY

#175 Jan 10, 2013
I totally support TOTAL Legalization. I am a 76 yr old, 3rd stage breast cancer survivor and cannabis activist.. It should be declared legal for ALL purposes..Give the people what they want..Any attempts to abolish it in my life time has been unsuccessful..
ThomasA

Birmingham, AL

#176 Jan 10, 2013
Arlene Williams wrote:
I totally support TOTAL Legalization. I am a 76 yr old, 3rd stage breast cancer survivor and cannabis activist.. It should be declared legal for ALL purposes..Give the people what they want..Any attempts to abolish it in my life time has been unsuccessful..
You are probably retired and don't work in a company that has a zero tolerance drug policy for it's employees. There are too many clean people out there looking for work to choose from so why would a company risk stoners and dopers on the premises to run the risk of running up their insurance program?
Nipple Ripper

Oklahoma City, OK

#177 Jan 10, 2013
Yo, ThomasA, I just smoked a joint.....haha, I hope that pisses you and the other prohibitionist off!!!!
roddy

United States

#178 Jan 10, 2013
Killing more brain cells I see, that explain the topic......huuummmm!!..
ThomasA

Birmingham, AL

#179 Jan 11, 2013
Nipple Ripper wrote:
Yo, ThomasA, I just smoked a joint.....haha, I hope that pisses you and the other prohibitionist off!!!!
Doesn't bother me a bit. You have an absolute right to smoke when you want and you have an absolute right to face the consequences if you get a DUI or get busted at work,that is if you have a job.
Maria

New York, NY

#180 Jan 17, 2013
No Command it's just bad

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