Marijuana Debate - Middleville, MI

Discuss the national Marijuana debate in Middleville, MI.

Do you support the legalization of Marijuana?

Middleville supports
Support
 
14
Oppose
 
2

Vote now in Middleville:

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p

United States

#1 Sep 6, 2010
democracy
alli m

Owosso, MI

#2 Sep 17, 2010
yes I support it. I don't smoke it, but I support it.
diane noteboom

Caledonia, MI

#3 Sep 21, 2010
God put it here for a reason
Jon

Boyne City, MI

#4 Sep 22, 2010
Marijuana is for losers
Gimley

Snohomish, WA

#5 Oct 9, 2010
It is safer than almost all prescription drugs
kingviper

Grand Rapids, MI

#6 Nov 14, 2010
What will the Pharmaceutical companies to do when they begin to lose money to Medical Marijuana ( Because Medical Marijuana works, without serious side effects) They will then engage their Special Interest groups to protect their DRUG finance. Donít get me wrong, Pharmaceuticals have saved countless lives, but not without side effects greater then Medical Marijuana . And that will have Our government saying that Medical Marijuana is bad for our Sick and Dieing, and will side with the Pharmaceutical companies and if the people do win over the pharmaceutical (And Our government), they will be in charge of the manufacturing and distribution of Medial Marijuana, by agreement with Our government. No home based operationís or a central distribution centers from around our state from people who really understand what it is to witness their love one going though pain and or death. I'll try my best to see that someone that is in pain, can get what they need to get though the day with as little pain, and cost as I can..
Kingviper
Bill Miller

Caledonia, MI

#7 Nov 15, 2010
The Residents of Michigan voted more than 63% in favor...:)
Sheldon Brown

Allegan, MI

#8 Nov 26, 2010
I love Pot!!!!! It makes me horny.... So suck it!!!!
Kingviper

Holland, MI

#9 Dec 23, 2010
Americans with handicap have no way to feel that they have a choice in their medical care. The law was pasted by more then the majority, but the few in our goverment that are influanced by how bad Medical Maijauna is for you , that they will make their disision base solely on the abuser, then the ones who really benafit from the new law. They leave the handicap feeling like a crimminal well trying to find their medicine, because they have nowhere to get it. Please have compassion for these people.

Since: Jul 10

Location hidden

#10 Dec 27, 2010
Medical MJ from a pharmacy and with a prescription only, I fully support it. Legalizing for the general public, no way, it is a gateway drug just like a lot of prescription drugs. Prescription drugs are a necessary evil for the sick and terminally ill.
stepping stoned

United States

#11 Dec 27, 2010
MicheaelW wrote:
Medical MJ from a pharmacy and with a prescription only, I fully support it. Legalizing for the general public, no way, it is a gateway drug just like a lot of prescription drugs. Prescription drugs are a necessary evil for the sick and terminally ill.
It is not a gateway drug. Back up that assertion with proof that it is a "gateway drug" and you will be a unique individual, because it hasn't been done yet.

Since: Jul 10

Location hidden

#12 Dec 27, 2010
stepping stoned wrote:
<quoted text>It is not a gateway drug. Back up that assertion with proof that it is a "gateway drug" and you will be a unique individual, because it hasn't been done yet.
Well I have over twenty years working for the DOD in drug demand reduction, plus I have witnessed it first hand which is all the proof I need. I also know that nothing I say or how much proof I would provide, a dope smoking loser like yourself will never believe me. I also know that potheads like yourself abusing MJ is the reason that terminally ill and cancer patients can't the drug they need to ease their suffering. You pathetic dopers will use any excuse to make this crap more accessible, even if it means lowering yourself to the point of using the terminally ill to get you fix. You even use the excuse that it will reduce crime and increase tax revenue, bullish-it, nothing could be farther from the truth.
stepping stoned

United States

#13 Dec 28, 2010
MicheaelW wrote:
<quoted text>
You even use the excuse that it will reduce crime and increase tax revenue, bullish-it, nothing could be farther from the truth.
Let's see, somewhere over 800,000 arrests in a year for breaking marijuana laws (that's a lot). 800.000 arrests for the crime of doing something which hurts no one, except possibly the user themselves. So we could do away with 800,000 arrests next year if marijuana was regulated like other drugs which we are allowed to buy. Also the sale of marijuana would then be handled by law-abiding citizens and their legal enterprises, as opposed to being sold exclusively by criminals.
Being an illegal businessman is easier in some ways if you think about it, because when someone rips you off or swindles you in some way, you can just kill them. Legal action and arbitration are time consuming and expensive ways to resolve disputes in comparison.
Of course those legal enterprises would be paying taxes on the money that would come in from the sale of the marijuana. And as marijuana is always in demand, and is the #1 cash crop of several states, I think we can safely predict a vigorous trade.
Which means tax revenue.
(Here's a clue to figuring out what all this means. Illegal drug dealers do not pay taxes as if they were operating a legitimate business. A product which is sold and used in every town in america every day of every year is not currently taxed at all, effectively.)

So I'm afraid that your statement about "nothing could be farther from the truth" does not hold up under scrutiny at all.

(p.s. It's okay to just admit that you know there is no evidence that marijuana is any sort of gateway or stepping stone or whatever the theory is called at any given time. Just admit that you believe it is a "gateway drug" even though you know there is no valid basis for calling it that.)

Since: Jul 10

Location hidden

#14 Dec 28, 2010
stepping stoned wrote:
<quoted text>
Let's see, somewhere over 800,000 arrests in a year for breaking marijuana laws (that's a lot). 800.000 arrests for the crime of doing something which hurts no one, except possibly the user themselves. So we could do away with 800,000 arrests next year if marijuana was regulated like other drugs which we are allowed to buy. Also the sale of marijuana would then be handled by law-abiding citizens and their legal enterprises, as opposed to being sold exclusively by criminals.
Being an illegal businessman is easier in some ways if you think about it, because when someone rips you off or swindles you in some way, you can just kill them. Legal action and arbitration are time consuming and expensive ways to resolve disputes in comparison.
Of course those legal enterprises would be paying taxes on the money that would come in from the sale of the marijuana. And as marijuana is always in demand, and is the #1 cash crop of several states, I think we can safely predict a vigorous trade.
Which means tax revenue.
(Here's a clue to figuring out what all this means. Illegal drug dealers do not pay taxes as if they were operating a legitimate business. A product which is sold and used in every town in america every day of every year is not currently taxed at all, effectively.)
So I'm afraid that your statement about "nothing could be farther from the truth" does not hold up under scrutiny at all.
(p.s. It's okay to just admit that you know there is no evidence that marijuana is any sort of gateway or stepping stone or whatever the theory is called at any given time. Just admit that you believe it is a "gateway drug" even though you know there is no valid basis for calling it that.)
I am not talking about the sixteen year old getting a ticket for having a joint numbskull, I am talking about the violent crime committed along our border, in the big cities, LA, San Fransisco, Dallas, Detroit, the list goes on. Let me ask you something, have you ever left the state of Michigan? MJ is only a small fraction of what is coming over the borders, allot of times a couple hundred pounds of pot will be sacrificed at the border along with the poor sap driving the vehicle to distract the customs agents while a few thousand pounds of cocaine or heroin is trucked in. You could really do yourself a service by sobering up for a month and taking a trip down to S. Arizona, or S. California and see for yourself the carnage and then tell me it hurts no one.

So by legalizing pot we can expect tax revenue to increase, is that what you are saying? Now its legal and now you are growing it in your back yard or in your basement, I mean, why buy it from the store when it's so easy to grow right? Why buy the Government regulated, THC regulated, over taxed pot when you can grow a much higher quality product yourself, right? Got to be twenty-one years old to buy pot, right? A sixteen year old can't go to the pot store and buy it, he is going to come to you, and you are going to sell it to him, crime committed, and no taxes payed! Here in N. California Fairfield we just busted a legal dispensary for selling MJ to minors and to people without a Medical prescription, the pot came from across the border in Mexico, if you have a Grow card its legal to grow it, why did they get their pot from Mexico? Answer so they didn't have to pay state taxes on it, thats why!

I will let you answer your own question about pot being a gateway drug. Is pot the first drug you tried? Have you ever tried any other types of drugs? Remember, the only person you will be lying to is yourself, I already know the truth. Lets assume you answered honestly and said yes, why did you try a new drug if pot is so great?

Since: Jul 10

Location hidden

#16 Dec 28, 2010
Sorry I ment the state of KY.

Since: Jul 10

Location hidden

#17 Dec 28, 2010
I have no idea why that posted twice!
stepping stoned

United States

#18 Dec 28, 2010
MicheaelW wrote:
<quoted text>
I am not talking about the sixteen year old getting a ticket for having a joint numbskull, I am talking about the violent crime committed along our border, in the big cities, LA, San Fransisco, Dallas, Detroit, the list goes on.
Well we should be a bit concerned about the amount of man-hours required by our police and justice system to process 800,000+ arrests a year, just for breaking marijuana laws. That is a lot of "crime" that could be done away with in an instant.
However, you're right, legalizing marijuana would not end the violence which we see committed by criminal organizations who profit from selling illegal drugs. After all, marijuana only tends to account for around 60% of their profits.
All drug prohibitions create this evil situation, just like alcohol prohibition did.
All drugs must eventually be legalized if we are to do away with the black market and if we are to remain a free people.

And as for your question about which drug I tried first, that was alcohol, then tobacco, then marijuana.
Unless we should count caffeine, since I did use it for recreational purposes, and that was even before I had tried alcohol. Maybe the caffeine pushed me to try all these horrible drugs I'm on.
I'm not going to count hard stuff like cough syrup that I had before I had even tried caffeine, because they were used specifically for symptoms and not recreationallly. Presumably they don't count, as such.

Also, like most americans, I could make my own alcoholic beverages, and grow my own tobacco, but I don't.
I even go to the grocery to buy all my vegetables.
I have no reason to believe that people would not buy legal marijuana.

Since: Jul 10

Location hidden

#19 Dec 29, 2010
stepping stoned wrote:
<quoted text>
Well we should be a bit concerned about the amount of man-hours required by our police and justice system to process 800,000+ arrests a year, just for breaking marijuana laws. That is a lot of "crime" that could be done away with in an instant.
However, you're right, legalizing marijuana would not end the violence which we see committed by criminal organizations who profit from selling illegal drugs. After all, marijuana only tends to account for around 60% of their profits.
All drug prohibitions create this evil situation, just like alcohol prohibition did.
All drugs must eventually be legalized if we are to do away with the black market and if we are to remain a free people.
And as for your question about which drug I tried first, that was alcohol, then tobacco, then marijuana.
Unless we should count caffeine, since I did use it for recreational purposes, and that was even before I had tried alcohol. Maybe the caffeine pushed me to try all these horrible drugs I'm on.
I'm not going to count hard stuff like cough syrup that I had before I had even tried caffeine, because they were used specifically for symptoms and not recreationallly. Presumably they don't count, as such.
Also, like most americans, I could make my own alcoholic beverages, and grow my own tobacco, but I don't.
I even go to the grocery to buy all my vegetables.
I have no reason to believe that people would not buy legal marijuana.
You have no idea what the heck you are talking about, and a perfect example of why you shouldn't do drugs. Later loser, thanks for the laugh!
stepping stoned

United States

#20 Dec 29, 2010
MicheaelW wrote:
<quoted text>
You have no idea what the heck you are talking about, and a perfect example of why you shouldn't do drugs. Later loser, thanks for the laugh!
Seems to me that you are a perfect proof that sobriety is no guarantee of intelligence or insight.
Travis Watkins

Grand Rapids, MI

#22 Jan 4, 2011
I Love that shit mane...

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