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561 - 580 of 1,974 Comments Last updated Monday Jul 21
tmazz

Funabashi, Japan

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#575
Dec 8, 2009
 
Cheki wrote:
could someone please translate the following?
Ndinuda kuti uyite mukadzi wangu
I have no idea what this says and I apologize in advance if it is anything vulgar. It is a message from a male friend who most certainly thinks I will NEVER know what it means. Thank you.
ndinoda I want
uyite you to be
mukadzi wife
wangu mine

I want you to be my wife
tmazz

Funabashi, Japan

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#576
Dec 8, 2009
 
John Marehlio wrote:
You're beautifull into shona
thanks very much
john from Holland
wakanaka You are beautiful

Uri tsvarakadenga
(this one is proverbial)
tmazz

Kamagaya, Japan

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#577
Dec 8, 2009
 
hi haters wrote:
<quoted text>Tmazz I am trying to learn this language, my BF is zim and I have bought a book that was recommended (beginners shona) but i am having a hard time grasping it. He just teaches me phrases or words.
hey long time. My aplogies i never got to help you with the stuff u needed. But I have found a site that handles the same.Hope it helps
http://www.shonalanguage.info/index.htm
tmazz

Kamagaya, Japan

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#578
Dec 8, 2009
 
To all those who are interested in learning Shona i bumped into this helpful website. Hope it helps

http://www.shonalanguage.info/index.htm

Since: Dec 09

Sydney, Australia

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#579
Dec 9, 2009
 
Please translate "public relations expert" into Shona for me.

One of Zimbabwean friends refers to himself in this way and I want to surprise him by using the Shona expression when I email him.
tmazz

Kamagaya, Japan

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#580
Dec 9, 2009
 
Sekuru wrote:
Please translate "public relations expert" into Shona for me.
One of Zimbabwean friends refers to himself in this way and I want to surprise him by using the Shona expression when I email him.
its a tricky one, but here is my attempt;
mazvikokota wezvekudyidzana neveruzhinji

tell me how it goes

Since: Dec 08

UK

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#581
Dec 9, 2009
 
tmazz wrote:
<quoted text>
its a tricky one, but here is my attempt;
mazvikokota wezvekudyidzana neveruzhinji
tell me how it goes
I couldn't put it any better myself....

Since: Dec 09

Sydney, Australia

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#582
Dec 9, 2009
 
Ndeipi tmazz and De Minimus,
Thank you for the translation and the confirmation.
My three vazukuru think that I am too old to be trying to learn their language. They find the whole process quite amusing.
Please help me to understand how you have constructed "public relations expert" by explaining the meaning of each of the words "mazvikokota wezvekudyidzana neveruzhinji".
Ndatenda. Uzvichengetedze.
tmazz

Kamagaya, Japan

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#583
Dec 9, 2009
 
Sekuru wrote:
Ndeipi tmazz and De Minimus,
Thank you for the translation and the confirmation.
My three vazukuru think that I am too old to be trying to learn their language. They find the whole process quite amusing.
Please help me to understand how you have constructed "public relations expert" by explaining the meaning of each of the words "mazvikokota wezvekudyidzana neveruzhinji".
Ndatenda. Uzvichengetedze.
The reason why that was tricky is the Zimbawean education system is in English and thus there has not been any need for Shona translations for technical words or a phrase like that one.
mazvikokota- expert
we- in/of
zvekudyidzana- relations/interaction(s)
ne- with/to
veruzhinji- public

Since: Dec 09

Sydney, Australia

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#584
Dec 9, 2009
 
tmazz wrote:
<quoted text>
The reason why that was tricky is the Zimbawean education system is in English and thus there has not been any need for Shona translations for technical words or a phrase like that one.
mazvikokota- expert
we- in/of
zvekudyidzana- relations/interaction(s)
ne- with/to
veruzhinji- public
Aaaah tmazz!
Adafa nekuseka! This is perfect. It is exactly what I want.
I cannot wait for my muzukuru's reaction.
Things are tough in Zim but he has a wonderful ability to negotiate the best deals for himself and his brothers.
He knows that my Shona is rudimentary. He will wonder how I came up with mazvikokota wezvekudyidzana neveruzhinji.
We won't tell him, eh?
Vevhudzi chena ndivo vane mazano.
tmazz

Kamagaya, Japan

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#585
Dec 9, 2009
 
Sekuru wrote:
<quoted text>
Aaaah tmazz!
Adafa nekuseka! This is perfect. It is exactly what I want.
I cannot wait for my muzukuru's reaction.
Things are tough in Zim but he has a wonderful ability to negotiate the best deals for himself and his brothers.
He knows that my Shona is rudimentary. He will wonder how I came up with mazvikokota wezvekudyidzana neveruzhinji.
We won't tell him, eh?
Vevhudzi chena ndivo vane mazano.
Sekuru your Shona sounds deep. How long have you been learning

Since: Dec 09

Sydney, Australia

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#586
Dec 10, 2009
 
tmazz wrote:
<quoted text>
Sekuru your Shona sounds deep. How long have you been learning
Ah tmazz,
Don't be fooled by this mudhara who is full of tricks.
I have only been learning Shona since I visited Zim a few months ago.
I have purchased a couple of dictionaries, a phrase book and a book on grammar. At present, I am trying to figure out how sentences are constructed and I am puzzled by stray letters that seem to creep into words as the different parts are added. I bought a 'Learn Shona' CD online. I am now putting all my efforts into mastering its contents to provide me with a foundation to build on.
I readily confess that any sophisticated sentences that I have written above I have copied from books or from others.
Nonetheless, I am serious about learning Shona. I think that, if I am going to understand the people, their spirit and their culture, I have to begin with their language.
I really appreciate your assistance. Please put up with my child-like attempts and help me to get it right.

Since: Dec 08

UK

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#587
Dec 10, 2009
 
tmazz wrote:
<quoted text>
The reason why that was tricky is the Zimbawean education system is in English and thus there has not been any need for Shona translations for technical words or a phrase like that one.
mazvikokota- expert
we- in/of
zvekudyidzana- relations/interaction(s)
ne- with/to
veruzhinji- public
Sekuru vanenge mazvikokota chaiye. Without reinventing the wheel too much, the reason certain words do not have shona translations is because they never existed in the shona language in the first place. A good example would be a word like "corner". Construction was historically oval/circular/round. The settlers introduced us to the corner. The shona word for it became "gonyo". This is in line with how one would describe a sweet potato (mbambaira). We say "yakagonya" to describe its structure. Shona however classes words like gonyo as "derivitives". The clue and logic are in the title. Many derivitives are now acceptable in the shona O'level/A'level syllabus. Other words include motokari, waya etc etc.

This is what I remember from school. It was a long time ago though so if I have distorted the facts or missed the point completely, I trust you will set the record straight. Have a good one bhururu...

Since: Dec 09

Sydney, Australia

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#588
Dec 11, 2009
 
I have received an email from a friend who has signed off with anodikanwa Rufaro.
I don't recognise the word anodikanwa.
What does it mean?
How is it constructed?

Since: Dec 09

Sydney, Australia

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#589
Dec 11, 2009
 
In my notes I have written the words 'bvuma wasakara'.
However, I can't remember the context in which I came across them and I am unable to translate them.
What does this expression mean?
How are the words constructed?

Since: Dec 08

UK

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#590
Dec 11, 2009
 
Sekuru wrote:
I have received an email from a friend who has signed off with anodikanwa Rufaro.
I don't recognise the word anodikanwa.
What does it mean?
How is it constructed?
anodikanwa Rufaro - loved one, Rufaro

Since: Dec 08

UK

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#591
Dec 11, 2009
 
Sekuru wrote:
In my notes I have written the words 'bvuma wasakara'.
However, I can't remember the context in which I came across them and I am unable to translate them.
What does this expression mean?
How are the words constructed?
Bvuma wasakara is a the title to an Oliver Mtukudzi song. It literraly translates to - Accept it (bvuma), you are old (wasakara). I have come across humourous uses of this phrase as a means to say happy birthday to someone.

The statement itself is not normally used in day to day interaction (especially not before Tuku coined the phrase in song) as it is not gramatically correct. However, for artistic reasons, one can accept and justify its use. As you may already be aware, in the song Tuku refers to an elderly member of society/the family and puts it to them that old age should be celebrated as a sign of good health and life. Basically, he attempts to encourage aging gracefully. Personally, and I am sure most would agree, he may have been referring to certain political figures who have been in power since 1980. This is just my personal view though and bears no reflection on Mr. Mtukudzi.
tmazz

Kamagaya, Japan

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#592
Dec 11, 2009
 
Sekuru wrote:
I have received an email from a friend who has signed off with anodikanwa Rufaro.
I don't recognise the word anodikanwa.
What does it mean?
How is it constructed?
anodikanwa- beloved/one who is dear
a- is a pronoun inflection for one (third person)
no- auxiliary verb to be in the present tense (is)
di- from the verb root -da which means love
kanwa- is a double verbal extension which implies passivity for the subject.(receiver of the love action)
Try visiting the website I posted a few days ago it handles most of the inflections systematically
tmazz

Kamagaya, Japan

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#593
Dec 11, 2009
 
Sekuru wrote:
In my notes I have written the words 'bvuma wasakara'.
However, I can't remember the context in which I came across them and I am unable to translate them.
What does this expression mean?
How are the words constructed?
bvuma -accept it/face it
wa- You
sakara- old
Sakara is a verb functioning as an adjective. It (the word) primarily means old as contrasted with new so its used to refer to old age age as a figure of speech

Since: Dec 09

Sydney, Australia

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#594
Dec 11, 2009
 
tmazz wrote:
<quoted text>
bvuma -accept it/face it
wa- You
sakara- old
Sakara is a verb functioning as an adjective. It (the word) primarily means old as contrasted with new so its used to refer to old age age as a figure of speech
Ndatenda, tmazz.

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