Please help translate a Somali idiom!

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aifos

Elmhurst, NY

#1 Apr 23, 2012
I'm an English-speaking journalist writing about Somali and a Somali I met told me of this idiom: "Ruh markukulajoka majaclit makutaku battabli." He wrote it down for me, but unfortunately I do now know what it means. Can anyone help me? Thank you!
Prince Ugaas Sharmarke

Europe

#2 Apr 23, 2012
Lemme try: "when with u can't love him, but when he gone, defenetly going to miss and fall in LOVE".
aifos

Elmhurst, NY

#3 Apr 24, 2012
I think I understand, thanks---something about how we appreciate people more when they are gone.
Can I impose on you to translate each of the words individually for me, so that I can try to follow the Somali phrase word by word?
And also, can anyone confirm that I have made no spelling mistake in the idiom as I wrote it above? Thank you again, very much!

“www.waardiye.com”

Since: Apr 12

Minneapolis, MN

#4 Apr 24, 2012
First of all, are you Somali or non -Somali? The correct words in somali are "Ruux markuu kula joogo ma jeclid; Markuuse tako baa tebi" It's tough to translate word by word, because Somali language or idioms don't follow the same grammatical rule as English.

So, they are two compound sentences and it means " You don't see someone's love when he/she is with you, but you will miss him/her when he/she is gone" It looks like a Somali guy loved you but you didn't pay attention, damn.
wadani

UK

#5 Apr 24, 2012
aifos wrote:
I'm an English-speaking journalist writing about Somali and a Somali I met told me of this idiom: "Ruh markukulajoka majaclit makutaku battabli." He wrote it down for me, but unfortunately I do now know what it means. Can anyone help me? Thank you!
firsly let me put in somali

ruux markuu kula joogo majeclid,
markuu tagana matabtid,

is like someone u don't have any feeling for them.

i hope my English ok.

“www.waardiye.com”

Since: Apr 12

Minneapolis, MN

#6 Apr 24, 2012
English has a similiar idiom. "You never know what you have until you lose it, and once you lose it, you can never get it back."
aifos

Elmhurst, NY

#7 Apr 24, 2012
Thank you all. No, I am not Somali (as you can probably tell!). But I interviewed a Somali for an article I am writing and he used this idiom as a way to explain something that had happened in his village. I'd like to be sure that I use the idiom properly.

Saaxiib, you have corrected my spelling and written the idiom this way:
"Ruux markuu kula joogo ma jeclid; Markuuse tako baa tebi"

Wadani, you have it like this:
"Ruux markuu kula joogo majeclid; markuu tagana matabtid"

I realize there are inconsistencies in written Somali, but the last three (or four) words seems noticeably different for you two. Can you explain why, or suggest which is the more "typical" form I should use in a book to be published in the US? Thank again very much.

Since: Jul 11

Location hidden

#8 Apr 24, 2012
aifos wrote:
Thank you all. No, I am not Somali (as you can probably tell!). But I interviewed a Somali for an article I am writing and he used this idiom as a way to explain something that had happened in his village. I'd like to be sure that I use the idiom properly.
Saaxiib, you have corrected my spelling and written the idiom this way:
"Ruux markuu kula joogo ma jeclid; Markuuse tako baa tebi"
Wadani, you have it like this:
"Ruux markuu kula joogo majeclid; markuu tagana matabtid"
I realize there are inconsistencies in written Somali, but the last three (or four) words seems noticeably different for you two. Can you explain why, or suggest which is the more "typical" form I should use in a book to be published in the US? Thank again very much.
I don't know, if you know this, but south Somalis and North somalis talk different accent. Its like English-american and English-England. Sometime I myself don't understand south-Somalis.

“www.waardiye.com”

Since: Apr 12

Minneapolis, MN

#9 Apr 24, 2012
Well, Somali language both in written and spoken is difficult to understand unless you're a born Somali. We write and speak things differetly even if we came from the same hometown.

In Somali language there is no such thing as Subject + Verb + Object. We can switch and put words in a different positions and it doesn't change the meaning of the sentence.

We two wrote the second sentence into different ways but you will be surprised that I would have written the same senetence in different way if you will ask it another time.

So, I wrote the last words as "Markuuse tako baa tebi" and Wadani wrote as "markuu tagana matabtid,
"
The first words means "when" but I addesd "se" which means "but". Wadani removed se from the end of the first word but he added "ma" in front of the last word. ma and se has the same meaning and both means "but". That is not all and there are too many propositions that we write differently but have the ame meaning. Now let me write that idoms in another ways.

Markuu Ruuxu kula jogo ma rabtid, markuu kaa tago uun baad tabi. Now let me switch the positions of the two sentences.

Markuu ruuxu kaa tago ma tabtid, markuuse kula joogo baad jeclaan. So dear don't waste your time understandind Somali idoms and saying unless you want to learn somali language. Both me and wadani are correct andy you can use one of them. thanks

Saaxiib from www.waardiye.com
aifos

Elmhurst, NY

#10 Apr 25, 2012
Very complicated indeed! Thank you again, Saaxiib. I now have an entirely new respect for the complexities of your language. But alas, I am not at the moment in any position to learn the Somali language---I have a book deadline to meet before I can take on any other task!

The man whom I am quoted in my original post above is a nomadic Somali who lives in North Eastern Province (Kenya), so I wonder, is it possible that the way he wrote out the idiom for me is the way Somalis in Kenya might write it?

Or put another way: if you were in my shoes, trying to do your best to write the idiom in a version of Somali that would be most appropriate for an ethnic Somali from North Eastern Province, which version would you choose?

And lastly: he said something else to me in Somali. "Waan uoyee Ahmed inosonoktho"---which I was told meant "I cry for Ahmed to come back." Is that correct? And should it too be spelled differently to conform to a version of written Somali that most Somalis would understand?

This, I promise, is my last question to you! I am truly grateful for your help. Yours, Nina
aifos

Elmhurst, NY

#11 Apr 25, 2012
Sorry for the typo above. Meant to say "The man whom I quoted..." (not "I am quoted").
Axmed

Collinsville, IL

#12 Apr 25, 2012
This how you write waan u ooyeey Ahmed in uu soonokhdo

Since: Feb 12

Location hidden

#13 Apr 25, 2012
What you wrote here is not correct Somali but believe you mean: Ruux markuu kula joogo ma jeclid markuu kaa tagan waa towdaa; Which I can roughly translate; You appreciate more for a know person when the person isnīt around with you anymore

Since: Feb 12

Location hidden

#14 Apr 25, 2012
Edit;
You appreciate more for a known person when that person isnīt with you anymore.something like that
wadani

UK

#15 Apr 25, 2012
neverahateralwaysalover wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't know, if you know this, but south Somalis and North somalis talk different accent. Its like English-american and English-England. Sometime I myself don't understand south-Somalis.
these two sentences is simple to understand wherever u from in somalia, and no different south or north to interpret in somali language.
Axmed

Collinsville, IL

#16 Apr 25, 2012
aifos wrote:
Very complicated indeed! Thank you again, Saaxiib. I now have an entirely new respect for the complexities of your language. But alas, I am not at the moment in any position to learn the Somali language---I have a book deadline to meet before I can take on any other task!
The man whom I am quoted in my original post above is a nomadic Somali who lives in North Eastern Province (Kenya), so I wonder, is it possible that the way he wrote out the idiom for me is the way Somalis in Kenya might write it?
Or put another way: if you were in my shoes, trying to do your best to write the idiom in a version of Somali that would be most appropriate for an ethnic Somali from North Eastern Province, which version would you choose?
And lastly: he said something else to me in Somali. "Waan uoyee Ahmed inosonoktho"---which I was told meant "I cry for Ahmed to come back." Is that correct? And should it too be spelled differently to conform to a version of written Somali that most Somalis would understand?
This, I promise, is my last question to you! I am truly grateful for your help. Yours, Nina
waan u ooyeey Ahmed in uu soonokhdo. Which means I cried Ahmed to come back. If you looking for I cry which means waan ooyeey
aifos

Elmhurst, NY

#17 Apr 25, 2012
Okay, I think I've got it now.

For the idiom, I'm going to go with:
Ruux markuu kula jooga ma jeclid, markuuse tako baa tebi (loosely translated as "You don't know what you've got 'til it's gone").

And for the quotation about Ahmed, I'm going with:
Waan ooyeey Ahmed in uu soonokhdo (meaning "I cry for Ahmed to come back").

Any further corrections or suggestions? Please let me know. Thanks to all. Yours, with gratitude, Nina
wadani

UK

#18 Apr 25, 2012
aifos wrote:
Okay, I think I've got it now.
For the idiom, I'm going to go with:
Ruux markuu kula jooga ma jeclid, markuuse tako baa tebi (loosely translated as "You don't know what you've got 'til it's gone").
And for the quotation about Ahmed, I'm going with:
Waan ooyeey Ahmed in uu soonokhdo (meaning "I cry for Ahmed to come back").
Any further corrections or suggestions? Please let me know. Thanks to all. Yours, with gratitude, Nina
u welcome
WaryaaGuy

Oslo, Norway

#19 Apr 25, 2012
aifos wrote:
I'm an English-speaking journalist writing about Somali and a Somali I met told me of this idiom: "Ruh markukulajoka majaclit makutaku battabli." He wrote it down for me, but unfortunately I do now know what it means. Can anyone help me? Thank you!
It should be written as follows in Somali: " qofku markuu kula joogo ma jeclid, markuu tago baad tabi."

Translation: you don't miss the person unless he is not with you.
It is an obvious fact that you will miss, for example, your close freinds or family members when you are far away from them.
WaryaaGuy

Oslo, Norway

#20 Apr 25, 2012
aifos wrote:
Okay, I think I've got it now.
For the idiom, I'm going to go with:
Ruux markuu kula jooga ma jeclid, markuuse tako baa tebi (loosely translated as "You don't know what you've got 'til it's gone").
And for the quotation about Ahmed, I'm going with:
Waan ooyeey Ahmed in uu soonokhdo (meaning "I cry for Ahmed to come back").
Any further corrections or suggestions? Please let me know. Thanks to all. Yours, with gratitude, Nina
Soo noqdo is the standard Somali. Soo nokhdo is Xamar dialect.

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