“turn back the hands of time”

Since: Apr 10

Location hidden

#65 Jun 4, 2012
Zeynab wrote:
Sheikh Puto aka Sheikh Voodoo:
Stop lying for once. The Toronto Police did not identify the ethnicity of the deceased nor the shooter. And, only few hours ago did the shooter surrendered himself to the Toronto Police and he is not Somali. Indeed, he's black man and his name is Christopher Husbands. He's well known to the police and was already in house arrest. Now, the deceased name is Muslim name and that does not make him Somali. You're ignoramus. Because many many Muslim names are also found in other ethnic groups such as Sudanese, Bengalis, Pakistanis, Indians and Arabs as well. Your sorry ass is desperate and not credible for you're a liar.
Sheikh Puto is out of his mind, the hermaphrodite is probably on his period. LOL.

Anyway, Canadians are killing twitter over this latest shooting. I don´t remember the last time I followed a discussion on twitter with this much intensity. Goodness.

Since: Dec 11

Location hidden

#66 Jun 4, 2012
INSEARCH_OF wrote:
<quoted text>
Sheikh Puto is out of his mind, the hermaphrodite is probably on his period. LOL.
Anyway, Canadians are killing twitter over this latest shooting. I don´t remember the last time I followed a discussion on twitter with this much intensity. Goodness.
Sheikh Voodoo's sorry ars is so busted LOL and Yes, the Canadians are so traumatized these days; the Luca Magnotta killer sending body parts to the political parties headquarters, then, fled the country, and before anyone else knew it's this shooting in the Eaton Centre; a huge mall and really busy place all the time. It's also in the heart of the city of Toronto and during the summer there're lots of outdoor festivals. People felt so unsafe, however, Toronto, is not immune to the crimes in big cities.

Since: Dec 11

Location hidden

#67 Jun 4, 2012
Edit: festivals in the area.
Sheikh Voodoo

Melbourne, Australia

#68 Jun 4, 2012
Zeynab wrote:
<quoted text>
Sheikh Voodoo's sorry ars is so busted LOL and Yes, the Canadians are so traumatized these days; the Luca Magnotta killer sending body parts to the political parties headquarters, then, fled the country, and before anyone else knew it's this shooting in the Eaton Centre; a huge mall and really busy place all the time. It's also in the heart of the city of Toronto and during the summer there're lots of outdoor festivals. People felt so unsafe, however, Toronto, is not immune to the crimes in big cities.
Fat lady, you better raise your kids well before the ghetto raises them for you. the victims (the deceased and his mate, the injured in hospital) has been established beyond reasonable doubt to be zoomalis and members of a gang who deals in drugs and know to the cops. the deceased somali chap has been just released from the slammer. the killer a 'guyanese migrant' was also a member of the same gang and was stabbed by the deceased and his mate the injured bloke 20 times after a drug deal gone wrong, few weeks ago. This was a payback biatch, as they say in gang circles.

wait for further news, this is Sheikh Voodoo reporting from Saturn.

this indicates you somali mums in canada are addicted to welfare, your whole life, resources and time revolves arround and is consumed by buying dirac and jewelry and attending weddings while your children become crime statistics. shame on you edo.
Sheikh Voodoo

Melbourne, Australia

#69 Jun 4, 2012
...........and known to the cops
Sheikh Voodoo

Melbourne, Australia

#70 Jun 4, 2012
Hassan was born in Somalia and immigrated to Toronto with his family in the 1990s, according to Mohamed Gilao, director of Toronto-based Somali settlement services centre Dejinta Beesha. His family later moved to Edmonton.

A family friend, who did not want to disclose his name, said Hassan had recently returned to Toronto. He moved in with his grandmother and an aunt at their downtown home.

Toronto police believe a 23-year-old man in hospital in critical condition, with bullet wounds to his neck and chest, was also from the same gang and may have been targeted during the shooting as well.

http://www.thestar.com/news/crime/article/120...
..........

from edmonton.

..........
Sheikh Voodoo

Melbourne, Australia

#71 Jun 4, 2012
another one (gangster wannabe) bites the dust.
Sheikh Voodoo

Cranbourne, Australia

#72 Jun 5, 2012
Zeynab wrote:
Sheikh Puto aka Sheikh Voodoo: Now, the deceased name is Muslim name and that does not make him Somali. You're ignoramus. Because many many Muslim names are also found in other ethnic groups such as Sudanese, Bengalis, Pakistanis, Indians and Arabs as well. Your sorry ass is desperate and not credible for you're a liar.
..........

eedo always check on your kids, don't let them be raised by thugs on the streets and cease your residence on Topix for their sake.
I don't lie. this is sheikh voodoo reporting from saturn with fair and balanced news.
..........

Accused Fort McMurray coke dealer targeted in Toronto shooting. Man shot dead in Eaton Centre had survived prior attempts on his life.
check his picture

http://www.cbc.ca/gfx/images/news/topstories/...

A man shot and killed in a downtown Toronto mall Saturday afternoon was facing drug charges in Fort McMurray, Alta., and had survived two previous attempts on his life. Ahmed Hassan, 24, was charged with cocaine trafficking in January 2010, along with five other people.

He was also charged with obstructing a police officer and possession of stolen goods. Hassan failed to appear in court on the charges, leading to the issue of two warrants for his arrest.
One of Hassan's co-accused, a 19-year-old man from the Toronto area, was killed three months later in a Fort McMurray apartment.

The victim's father, Abdul Kadir Ali, told CBC News that Hassan was a suspect in the death of his son, Abdinasir Dirie.

Hassan was out on bail at the time for the alleged forcible confinement of another Fort McMurray man, Jama Ahmed Mahamoud, in September 2008.

Charged with robbery, assault, confinement

Hassan was one of six Somali Canadians charged with robbery, assault and unlawful confinement. Under the conditions of his bail, he was supposed to be living with his parents in Edmonton.
Hassan eventually pleaded guilty to assault and theft in the incident. Toronto police believe Hassan and a second man shot several times in the neck and chest were the intended targets of Saturday's shooting at the Eaton Centre.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/story/...

This dead criminal absconded to face justice and was hidden from authorities by his aunt and his grandmum in Torronto. they should be charged too, to teach zoomalis a lesson.

"The victim's father, Abdul Kadir Ali, told CBC News that Hassan was a suspect in the death of his son, Abdinasir Dirie."

who was abdinasir the somali dude he allegedly killed? find out on the first page on this thread.

2010
January 22
Abdinasir Dirie, Ahmed Hassan, Rage Hassan Islow, Mohamed Yusuf and a 17-year-old minor are charged with cocaine trafficking and possession of proceeds of crime after RCMP raid an apartment unit at Penhorwood Street, Fort McMurray, Alberta.

February 5
Iman Ali – Abdinasir Dirie’s older sister – and Jamestown Cres. friend Hoda Mohamed depart from Montreal on an all-expenses paid trip to Montego Bay, Jamaica. They do not tell their families they have left the country.

February 13
Iman Ali and Hoda Mohamed are arrested in Montego Bay, Jamaica after authorities find nearly 20 kilos of marijuana hidden in their suitcases before boarding a plane back to Canada. They also do not contact their families for the next two months.

check the family claiming abdinasir was angel and couldn't be a thug/criminal.

The Life and Death of Abdinasir Dirie

http://www.inews880.com/Channels/Reg/LocalNew...

Inside the Somali code of silence

http://www.inews880.com/Channels/Reg/LocalNew...

Till zoomalis break this code of silence and act responsibly towards raising their children, they will be doomed.

“turn back the hands of time”

Since: Apr 10

Location hidden

#73 Jun 5, 2012
Hi Sheikh Doqon, how come the ethnicity of the killer hasn´t been reported?
Sheikh Voodoo

Cranbourne, Australia

#74 Jun 5, 2012
INSEARCH_OF wrote:
Hi Sheikh Doqon, how come the ethnicity of the killer hasn´t been reported?
the killer is a guyanese refugee who grew up with somali thugs and was part of their gang. after he was accused (by the gang) for ripping them off of drug proceeds, he (the guyanese guy) was stabbed six times by the deceased and friends, just few weeks ago.
mohajir

Toronto, Canada

#75 Jun 5, 2012
we must halt muslim immigration and be careful about blacks as well. these are the two main trouble-makers in the west. chinese, whites, etc don't do this kind of thing to such a high per capita extent.
Sheikh Voodoo

Melbourne, Australia

#76 Jun 9, 2012
The Alberta connection: T.O. shootings have national implications for Somali community

Wednesday, June 06, 2012
BY TAREK FATAH

Did the shooting at the Eaton Centre have links to the drug wars in Alberta?

This was the first question that came to my mind when I heard the dead man, Ahmad Hassan, was from Alberta.

In fact, until his murder, Hassan was wanted in Fort McMurray for failing to appear in court on cocaine trafficking and other charges following his arrest in a 2010 police bust.

One of Hassan’s co-accused was 19-year-old Abdinasir Dirie from the Toronto area, who was killed three months later in a Fort McMurray apartment.

The victim’s father, Abdul Kadir Ali, told CBC News Hassan was a suspect in the death of his son. In the last few years, over 30 Somali-Canadians have been shot to death in gang-related drug wars in Alberta that have plagued the Somali community there.

Most of these cases have gone unsolved, with the police complaining about a lack of co-operation from witnesses and leaders of the Somali community complaining police haven’t done enough to develop contacts within their community.

In one of those cases, a good cop’s reputation was tainted because he wanted to get to the bottom of a gang-related killing.

On New Year’s Day last year, 23-year old Mohamud Jama was shot dead in an Edmonton club that was full of people, mostly Somali Canadian youth.

After the shooting, as reported by the CBC, veteran Edmonton homicide detective Bill Clark complained only one witness was willing to give a description of the suspect, even though the club was full of people.

In frustration, he said if the community wouldn’t co-operate, the police would move on to other cases.

That triggered Farhiya Warsame, wife of the murdered man, and Jama’s family, to file a complaint with the Alberta Human Rights Commission against Clark, demanding he be removed from the investigation.

Warsame said she was concerned the case would be forgotten if Clark was left in charge, but the result was that a detective who was trying to find the killer was unfairly portrayed as a racist.

The police force later apologized for Clark’s remarks, but the problem remains.

Police continue to have trouble solving these murders, in part because of a lack of co-operation from witnesses in obtaining information.

The Canadian Somali community is in a deep crisis in Alberta and it is in their interest, as well as ours in Ontario, that their young men don’t get dragged further into the pits of criminal culture.

The drug business in Alberta is worth over $5 billion annually. William Pitt, a former RCMP officer and now a professor of criminology at Grant MacEwan College in Edmonton, says Somali-Canadians have been recruited by other gangs (such as the Hells Angels and aboriginal gangs) and are being used as low-level drug peddlers and mules to deliver drugs.

As he notes:“That makes them a disposable commodity — if the police get them, they don’t know much or have large quantities (of drugs) on them; and if they die… they are no loss to the gangs.” The Somali-Canadian community needs to stand up to these criminals in their midst.

Their leaders need to understand the police, in Alberta and Toronto, are their allies, not their adversaries.

And that critics of Somali drug runners are not racists.

http://www.torontosun.com/2012/06/05/the-albe...

"Did the shooting at the Eaton Centre have links to the drug wars in Alberta?

This was the first question that came to my mind when I heard the dead man, Ahmad Hassan, was from Alberta."

Too late Tareq, I said it before you did and check it for yourself in this thread.
wadani

UK

#77 Jun 10, 2012
Mr BLACK MAGIC VOODOO

how many times a day u thank Somali community?

without this FORUM u wd kill urself for stress.
Sheikh Voodoo

Melbourne, Australia

#78 Jun 10, 2012
wadani wrote:
Mr BLACK MAGIC VOODOO
how many times a day u thank Somali community?
without this FORUM u wd kill urself for stress.
siigeeste

who are the somali community? aren't you the one who unequivically stated that you would love to see all puntlanders held in guantanamo bay? go and watch porn with your kids, mr savage tribal man.
wadani wrote:
<quoted text>
can someone tell me where the puntlanders brain located if not in the ( doollaha )
another mj single mother came to light.
listen u gumaysi la daaq ppl we are thinking about what to do with u mj's after somalia unitet with waqooyi bro's so ur ship to yemen w'l arrive sn after that baayo.
wadani wrote:
<quoted text>
aaha well finished
what w'l we do if India refused to accept?
can we take them to guantanamo bay?
http://www.topix.com/forum/world/somalia/TOC6...
wadani

UK

#79 Jun 10, 2012
Sheikh Voodoo wrote:
<quoted text>
siigeeste
who are the somali community? aren't you the one who unequivically stated that you would love to see all puntlanders held in guantanamo bay? go and watch porn with your kids, mr savage tribal man.
<quoted text>
<quoted text>
http://www.topix.com/forum/world/somalia/TOC6...
don't u feel shame lying about ur accounts?

Somali forum is ur home that's why u using 15 different accounts AXMAQ.

STOP LYING Mr VOODOO
Sheikh Voodoo

Melbourne, Australia

#80 Jun 10, 2012
wadani wrote:
<quoted text>
don't u feel shame lying about ur accounts?
Somali forum is ur home that's why u using 15 different accounts AXMAQ.
STOP LYING Mr VOODOO
hit the road sigeyste. i dont talk to men who watch porn with their kids.
Sheikh Voodoo

Melbourne, Australia

#81 Jun 23, 2012
Young Somalis struggle to find peace in Canada

They are called the ciyaal baraf, or the children of the snow. The kids of a generation who fled blood-stained Somalia two decades ago.

Their parents sought refuge across the world in a mass exodus from civil war. Many settled in Canada, mostly in Toronto, where they raised their children, often in poverty. And, as the children came of age and branched out across the country, a new kind of grief emerged.

Since 2005, dozens of young men from Canada’s Somali community have been killed, most of them casualties along a cocaine-dusted corridor between the housing projects of Toronto and the oil patch in Alberta. Most cases remain unsolved.

The latest slaying was among the most brazen. Ahmed Hassan, a 24-year-old who’d been charged with dealing drugs in Alberta, was gunned down in Toronto’s Eaton Centre. His public death has nudged this grief into the spotlight and renewed calls from Somali community leaders for governments to help stop the bloodshed.

Ultimately, the shooting has forced the country to confront the vexing question of why so many of these young men who go west end up dead.

Western dream a nightmare

The Somali-Canadian community may be rooted in Toronto, but the source of its grief is in Alberta, where at least 23 young men have died in the past seven years.


There are about 3,000 Somalis who live in or near the oil-sands city of Fort McMurray. Their community is clustered in a series of low-rise apartments tucked between a grocery store, a mall and a graveyard. They come here dreaming of well-paying jobs, hoping to send money back home and end two decades of poverty. But many lack recognized skills and end up chronically underemployed, driving cabs or working as hotel housekeepers; or they’re unemployed, as is the case with more than 300 Somalis in Fort McMurray today.

“We’re called the lost generation,” explained Warsame Adam, a 29-year-old facility manager at the Fort McMurray mosque.“We’re hit from every direction, Somalis. It’s like we don’t belong anywhere.”

Mr. Adam found meaningful work out west. Others, however, heeded a different, persistent call – that of the drug trade.

“I don’t think anybody goes there saying,‘You know what, I’m going to go over there and become a drug dealer,’” said Ali Abdullahi, who runs youth programs for Somalis in Toronto and knew at least one of the men killed in Alberta.“It’s a lot of young men who go over there, look for work, and some of them may not have all the qualifications to find a job.”

But they still need to make money, said Hukun Hurur, a Somali leader in Fort McMurray.“And then they turn to other things.”

Cocaine use thrives in Alberta’s oil patch, driven by those who did find well-paying jobs. In 2010, Fort McMurray RCMP laid five cocaine-trafficking charges for every marijuana charge.

It’s a brisk trade. High-level dealers can quickly gross $5,000 a day selling crack and cocaine, making $12-per-hour labour jobs seem laughable.

“We don’t get a job. So the only option is to get money, to sell drugs,” said one young Somali-Canadian in Fort McMurray, who calls himself M.J.

“There’s something wrong with this city,” he said.
Sheikh Voodoo

Melbourne, Australia

#82 Jun 23, 2012
Civil war

Most of these children of the snow can trace their roots to strife-torn Somalia. In 1991, armed opposition groups overthrew the ruling military government, thrusting the country into a brutal and protracted civil war.

As the conflict worsened, migrants poured into Toronto, along with other cities in the United States and Britain. Many arrived with limited English skills and few resources. In places like Toronto, where there was no existing Somali community to join, families were left to fend for themselves.

Rima Berns-McGown, a University of Toronto professor who has studied the Somali diaspora in Canada and Britain, said many parents who brought their children abroad were suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder – yet another challenge for young families adapting to life on a new continent.

Those who came to Canada were overwhelmingly directed to Toronto’s social-housing projects, places like Regent Park and Jane and Finch, where residents are in frequent conflict with police. And as the children of the first wave of refugees grew up, many of them faced a double stigmatization as Muslims who are black – a situation some Somalis say was acutely reinforced after the 2001 terrorist attacks in New York.

Many of the rivalries that play out in Alberta are in fact nurtured in Toronto, where an estimated 80,000 Somali-Canadians live.

“Whatever’s going on over in Toronto, it comes over here,” M.J. said.“Everybody wants to make his money, so they’re going to shoot each other.”

The deadly pull westward among Toronto’s Somali community, according to one community source, began with one young man from the East Mall neighbourhood who got involved in Alberta’s lucrative oil-sands spinoff through a friend who was working there. When the man returned home to Toronto, he drove a flashy car, bought drinks for his friends and was rich enough to leave expensive items behind at bars and nightclubs.

The siren song of easy money was attractive to some of the young men he grew up with, many of whom were struggling to find work in Toronto. A few left to join him. Soon after, others followed.

“He really recruited a lot of people into that stuff,” said the source, a respected member of the community who spoke on condition of anonymity.“It seems like there was a chain migration. One guy left and the others followed him.”

Looking to the U.S.

When Canadian law-enforcement officials attempted to better understand this phenomenon last year, one of the places they looked was Minnesota. The state is home to an estimated 32,000 Somali-Americans, the largest concentration in the U.S. There, as in Alberta, many young Somalis have sought prosperity in the Bakken oil fields of North Dakota, a 10-hour drive west of Minneapolis.

The heart of Minneapolis’s Somali community is Cedar-Riverside, an enclave often referred to as Little Mogadishu. The towers of Riverside Plaza – a social-housing complex that’s long been a haven for previous waves of refugees – are now home to thousands of Somali-Americans.

Police officer Jeanine Brudenell, who was invited to share her experiences with Canadian officials, began tracking street gangs in the city’s Somali community in 2005. Gradually, she said, her role shifted to providing programs aimed at teaching Somali-Americans about their legal rights and encouraging them to report criminal activity.
Sheikh Voodoo

Melbourne, Australia

#83 Jun 23, 2012
Minnesota police have long been frustrated with how difficult it is to solve crimes in the Somali community: of roughly eight gang-related homicides in Minneapolis in recent years, only one has been solved, a problem Ms. Brudenell attributes to distrust of police and the possibility of retaliation.“They don’t want to be testifying or be a witness because they fear they’re going to be in danger,” she said, adding,“It’s a fair fear.”

But for those who get caught up in the game and survive, the challenges are far from over.

Saeed Ibrahim Jama’s parents fled Somalia’s turmoil and went to Saudi Arabia, where he was born, before eventually ending up in Canada in 2001. They lived in poor neighbourhoods in Toronto and Winnipeg and Edmonton, and Mr. Jama and his older brother both fell into crime.

Mr. Jama served 27 months for getting caught with drugs he planned to sell. Since being released, he said he’s turned his life around, but was denied citizenship. Last Wednesday, Canada served him a final deportation notice. On July 22, barring a last-minute legal intervention, he’ll be deported to Somalia, a country he has never stepped foot in.

The federal official ruled he faced no “significant personalized risk” by returning to a country where it recommends Canadian citizens “avoid all travel.”

Mr. Jama is repentant.“I completely understand why they want to deport me. I understand it. I did what I did,” he said this week. But, he said, the government is making it impossible for his generation to make amends.

“I’ve been working, doing everything I can. I don’t make no trouble. But they don’t see it,” he said. Once part of a middle-class family that began to struggle, he says he got into drugs for the money, and because of peer pressure. His oldest sister is a university graduate, and another sister is in university. But he and his brother, the ciyaal baraf, have criminal records.

“I was young, and I didn’t take it seriously,” he said, adding some advice for other young Somalis.“They need to look at what their parents went through to get them here. But no one sees it like that.”


http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/...
Sheikh Voodoo

Melbourne, Australia

#84 Jun 23, 2012
"Saeed Ibrahim Jama’s parents fled Somalia’s turmoil and went to Saudi Arabia, where he was born, before eventually ending up in Canada in 2001. They lived in poor neighbourhoods in Toronto and Winnipeg and Edmonton, and Mr. Jama and his older brother both fell into crime.

Mr. Jama served 27 months for getting caught with drugs he planned to sell. Since being released, he said he’s turned his life around, but was denied citizenship. Last Wednesday, Canada served him a final deportation notice. On July 22, barring a last-minute legal intervention, he’ll be deported to Somalia, a country he has never stepped foot in."

where is the dad?

"Mr. Jama is repentant.“I completely understand why they want to deport me. I understand it. I did what I did,” he said this week. But, he said, the government is making it impossible for his generation to make amends."

“I’ve been working, doing everything I can. I don’t make no trouble. But they don’t see it,” he said. Once part of a middle-class family that began to struggle, he says he got into drugs for the money, and because of peer pressure. His oldest sister is a university graduate, and another sister is in university. But he and his brother, the ciyaal baraf, have criminal records.

“I was young, and I didn’t take it seriously,” he said, adding some advice for other young Somalis.“They need to look at what their parents went through to get them here. But no one sees it like that.”

Make him an example to other somalis and send him back to somalia, he will be an asset to his tribe and kill other somalis.

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