President Siad Barre: A Hero or Villain?

Posted in the Somalia Forum

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Judge

Columbus, OH

#1 May 17, 2012
Most of you are too young to answer this well. But here is my 3 cents.

As a neutral Somali, and not by relation to the man by tribe or generation, I would say he was a Hero, and here are 10 why's.

1. History rewards the risk-takers. The list of presidents and the bold initiatives that pushed them up in the rankings are obvious, like many presidents in the past and present, Siad Barre was a as risk taker as the ruler of arab world leaders. He did not democratically deal with his opponents, nor calculated the consequences of military action to the voices that created a negative image of him in the last couple of years of his 21 years progressive term for Somalia. No man (let alone a president) foresees what his actions will be 21 years into the future.

2. A president who actively campaigns for his historical place is engaged in a self-defeating exercise. Siad Barre will be among "the best loved" presidents of Somalia, and a man who came to office in a victory to unite Somalis with a promise of "Bring Somalia as Regional Super Power" following colonial era. Somali forces fought and pushed Ethiopia forces, deep into their country, a nation with 10 times more population than Somalia. This happend under the watch of Siad Barre, whether this is considered insignificant or not. He was feared by all Somali enemies, foreign and domestic.

3. There is no single theory of presidential success anywhere in the world. Public persona has much to do with how a president is perceived in his own country. A grounded president has a different image to his people than one who has a public life with little value to his people. Siad Barre's public life was created for him through his large and extended family and associates, and eventually by his tribe at the end of his presidency. No matter how a great a president maybe, some forces can easily overshadow and can ultimately bring a triumphant public relations.

4. Presidents can only be understood within the context, conventions and limitations of their time. The lens Somali see through Siad Barre today is very different than then one he was seen in the 70's and 80's. Those who judge presidents do not have license to simply dismiss earlier generations; instead, the obligation is ours to try to understand them. Somalia thrived as a single nation under Siad Barre, today we have more divided Somalia since it's existence.

5. If presidents are governed by any law beyond the Constitution, it is the law of unintended consequences. Certain events overwhelm a president, like President Bush and the 9/11 attacks. Domestic upheaval, shameful outbreaks of tribal intolerance mocked his idealism and reordered Siad Barre's priorities unconventionally.

6. Presidential power, although awesome on paper, is based largely on moral authority. Moral authority to achieve his objectives was not Siad Barre's strongest suites, although his goals were with good intentions as any Somali who lived under his rule in 70's and 80's would tell you. His legend began when millions saw a side of Siad Barre they never knew existed after his opponents brought their attacks to his bases. This market the decline of what could have been the father of Somalia legacy.

7. A president requires a talent for making useful enemies. History's most admired presidencies were often locked in struggles with adversaries who gave them power. Unfortunately, Siad Barre's enemies were out of sight from the Somali public, like Mohamed Farah Aidid, who extended his coup d'état to the rest of the Somali public, including his own circles just before he died.

8. Every great president marches to the beat of his own drummer. Siad Barre's capabilities were not fully understood by the majority of Somalis. With his long reign, he was short-sighted how dictatorship can lead to a sudden end of a president's reign.
Judge

Columbus, OH

#2 May 17, 2012
9. The challenge posed by any crisis is equaled by the opportunity for leaders to forge an emotional bond with the people they lead to gain moral authority and expanded powers. Siad Barre was running an unlawful detention covertly and publically just before the civil war. Few Somali never doubted his belief that he had to do such wrong cause in order to save the rest of the Country from a civil war.

10. Greatness, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. Siad Barre will be discussed by any means, good or bad in Somali history today and the many years to come. The age of Siad Barre will be referenced to help a wounded country get back on it's feet. A case in point, the current TFG uses Siad Barre's former palace as a base to rebuild the country.
Reer dini kid

Minneapolis, MN

#3 May 18, 2012
Columbus has a large marehan community among the states.
Judge

Columbus, OH

#4 May 18, 2012
Reer dini kid wrote:
Columbus has a large marehan community among the states.
I did say I had relation to the man. I take it as you hate the former president.
Reer dini kid

Minneapolis, MN

#5 May 18, 2012
Hate?Never i am related to him as well in a way. I am pride of marehan and he is a inspiration of mine.you know my name probably.I come from very known family
Judge

Columbus, OH

#6 May 18, 2012
Reer dini kid wrote:
Hate?Never i am related to him as well in a way. I am pride of marehan and he is a inspiration of mine.you know my name probably.I come from very known family
That's cool.

Since: May 12

Location hidden

#7 May 18, 2012
a hero

“Gaal wannabe”

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#8 May 18, 2012

“You Have Died Corfield!!”

Since: Feb 12

Dervishes Were Thunderbolts!

#9 May 18, 2012
Nationalist, A patriot turned War lord sadly

“Gaal wannabe”

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#10 May 18, 2012
Most of you are too young to answer this well. But here is my 3 cents.

As a neutral North Korean, and not by relation to the man by tribe or generation, I would say he was a Hero, and here are 10 why's.

1. History rewards the risk-takers. The list of presidents and the bold initiatives that pushed them up in the rankings are obvious, like many presidents in the past and present, Kim Jong Il was a as risk taker as the ruler of Asian world leaders. He did not democratically deal with his opponents, nor calculated the consequences of military action to the voices that created a negative image of him in the last couple of years of his 21 years progressive term for North Korea. No man (let alone a president) foresees what his actions will be 21 years into the future.

2. A president who actively campaigns for his historical place is engaged in a self-defeating exercise. Kim Jong Il will be among "the best loved" presidents of North Korea, and a man who came to office in a victory to unite North Koreans with a promise of "Bring North Korea as Regional Super Power" following Japan’s empirical era. North Korean forces fought and pushed South Korean forces, deep into their country, a nation with 10 times more population than North Korea. This happend under the watch of Kim Jong Il, whether this is considered insignificant or not. He was feared by all North Korean enemies, foreign and domestic.

3. There is no single theory of presidential success anywhere in the world. Public persona has much to do with how a president is perceived in his own country. A grounded president has a different image to his people than one who has a public life with little value to his people. Kim Jong Il's public life was created for him through his large and extended family and associates, and eventually by his tribe at the end of his presidency. No matter how a great a president maybe, some forces can easily overshadow and can ultimately bring a triumphant public relations.

4. Presidents can only be understood within the context, conventions and limitations of their time. The lens South Koreans see through Kim Jong Il today is very different than then one he was seen in the 70's and 80's. Those who judge presidents do not have license to simply dismiss earlier generations; instead, the obligation is ours to try to understand them. North Korea thrived as a single nation under Kim Jong Il, today we have more united North Korea under Kim Jong-un.

5. If presidents are governed by any law beyond the Constitution, it is the law of unintended consequences. Certain events overwhelm a president, like President Bush and the 9/11 attacks. Domestic upheaval, shameful outbreaks of capitalist intolerance mocked his idealism and reordered Kim Jong Il's priorities unconventionally.

6. Presidential power, although awesome on paper, is based largely on moral authority. Moral authority to achieve his objectives was not Kim Jong Il's strongest suites, although his goals were with good intentions as any North Korean who lived under his rule would tell you. His legend began when millions saw a side of Kim Jong Il they never knew existed after his opponents brought their attacks to his bases. This market the decline of what could have been the father of North Korea legacy.

7. A president requires a talent for making useful enemies. History's most admired presidencies were often locked in struggles with adversaries who gave them power. Unfortunately, Kim Jong Il's enemies were out of sight from the North Korean public, like Lee Myung-Bak.

8. Every great president marches to the beat of his own drummer. Kim Jong Il's capabilities were not fully understood by the majority of South Koreans. With his long reign, he was short-sighted how dictatorship can lead to a sudden end of a president's reign.

“turn back the hands of time”

Since: Apr 10

Location hidden

#11 May 19, 2012
He was a hero, those who blame him for Somalia´s failure the past 21 years need to take their heads out of their asses and take some reponsibility and ask themselves how they have contributed to the downfall of Somalia.

Here´s the truth:

When Barre was in charge, Somalia was not considered the world´s most failed state, and the people from there were not considered the un-touchables of Africa. Somalia was beautiful and habitable, it largest export was not refugees. Today 21 years after Barre, Somalis are still chewing jaad and swimming on their jaad.

Rest in Peace to Jaale Siyaad.

“Peace... People... Peace.”

Since: Nov 11

Location hidden

#12 May 19, 2012
Greatest leader Somalia has ever had. AUN

Things got a little chaotic towards the end of his rule, but he was a beacon of hope and decency; yet surronded by underlings who were corrupt to the core - his regime's dying days are now associated with massacres.

However, his legacy has never been matched. Now he is gone, Somalia is ever desertifying, being looted of its fishstocks, facing nuclear poisoning of its waters and forever at war with itself. Our people are scattered across the world killing our culture whilst looking for a sense of identity in arabization/'bantuization', and our nation is ever balkanizing. All are things MSB was working to stop, his ousting opened the floodgates for such calamity to befall us.

Insha'Allah Somaliweyn will stand up again.
MIMI

Kensington, Australia

#13 May 19, 2012
"Absolute power corrupts absolutely"

Since: Apr 12

Location hidden

#14 May 19, 2012
Siad Barre Nothing but the worlds worst villain. Why? cus he destroyed his own country.
I don't like him for religious reasons.
&fe ature=related

but if you guys want to talk politics lets talk politics.
He was more of clan leader than a president. That's why he needed military force to rule.
He killed millions of somalis out of pride and power.
He never allowed the Somali people to learn how to lead and build their own country bc he had complete power.
monarchy would of been one thing but he gave his family and sub-clan all the important positions. His brother controlled all the printing press in somali.
you people know nothing about history and before you say i only hold this view bc im an isaaq, will think again.
A maraaxan, a clam member, a family member, his own niece said he was a dictator.
you can read more in her book "born in the big rains" by fadumo korn
real beautiful book, it has everything
khaatumo

Kent, WA

#15 May 19, 2012
siad barre is a national hero the people loved him it was armed terrorist groups who were paid by mengistu destroyed somalia like usc,ssdf and snm thats why to this day puntland and somaliland are puppets of raw meat eating ethiopians
Peace n shaax

United States

#16 May 19, 2012
There eould be no puntland somaliland if it wasn't for said barre. We would be on one somali.
khaatumo wrote:
siad barre is a national hero the people loved him it was armed terrorist groups who were paid by mengistu destroyed somalia like usc,ssdf and snm thats why to this day puntland and somaliland are puppets of raw meat eating ethiopians
Reer dini kid

Minneapolis, MN

#17 May 19, 2012
Peace n shaax wrote:
Siad Barre Nothing but the worlds worst villain. Why? cus he destroyed his own country.
I don't like him for religious reasons.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =WgvRMrFUgAwXX&feature=rel ated
but if you guys want to talk politics lets talk politics.
He was more of clan leader than a president. That's why he needed military force to rule.
He killed millions of somalis out of pride and power.
He never allowed the Somali people to learn how to lead and build their own country bc he had complete power.
monarchy would of been one thing but he gave his family and sub-clan all the important positions. His brother controlled all the printing press in somali.
you people know nothing about history and before you say i only hold this view bc im an isaaq, will think again.
A maraaxan, a clam member, a family member, his own niece said he was a dictator.
you can read more in her book "born in the big rains" by fadumo korn
real beautiful book, it has everything
I am also related to jalle siad he is my grandpa my father is even close friends with his son. Yes he gave lot of positions to his clan members including my grandpas but while he was in power somalia was one of the top 5 best countries in africa. We had a feard army even soviets feared us. We had nice infastructure in mogadishu it would have been nicer in other regions as well be didn't have much time to work it all out. What do you mean he didn't let somalis build their own country? when he was president somalia had a lot more freedoms then today ex for women you can show hair wear dresses in public and alot more. He killed millions out of pride and power? more like 9,000 damned rebels that were attacking millitary bases they needed to be dealt with swiftly, accordingly and with sheer force to show them who they are dealing with. They deserved what was coming to them they were what caused the fall of the somali republic and those damn thugs were on mengistu halli mariams pay roll damn traitorous scum. And yes all of those rebels were in issaq region and most were issaqs, snm they are called? Siad barre was the best president somalia ever had. And you said he was just rulng with millitary how else are you suppose to deal with ethopian armed traitous rebel scum.
Reer dini kid

Minneapolis, MN

#18 May 19, 2012
Our feared army when jalle siad was president
&fe ature=related
Reer dini kid

Minneapolis, MN

#19 May 19, 2012
I will be showing what jalle siad achieve in short time
&fe ature=related
Nomadic Prince

Saint Paul, MN

#21 May 19, 2012
Reer dini kid wrote:
Our feared army when jalle siad was president
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =GaEb7r_QA0QXX&feature=rel ated
That is one of my favorite videos, especially at 4:40, a very patriotic song indeed! Get rid of Isaaqs and Majarteens, and somalia will be a very strong nation!

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