Thousands of Singaporeans leaving 'nightmarish' Singapore

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Eric Zhang

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#1
Feb 12, 2010
 
Singapore envies Kiwi lifestyle
By Lincoln Tan 4:00 AM Tuesday Feb 9, 2010

The bait was better working hours, cheaper cars and housing - and in three weeks thousands from Singapore have registered their interest in living in New Zealand.

An Immigration New Zealand pilot project aimed at attracting Singaporean migrants has resulted in over 1000 registrations each week since it was launched last month, with 3565 potential immigrants having registered their interest in just three weeks.

Would-be migrants are told of comparatively cheaper housing, car ownership and a relaxed lifestyle - and those who registered their interest on newzealandnow.gov t.nz received an email from Immigration telling them how to apply for relevant visas.

Immigration expert Paul Spoonley said the level of interest was "unexpected and fascinating".

"I think the draw for many Singaporeans is not so much the cheaper cars or housing, but the lower-stress environment and because New Zealand offers quality education in English," said Professor Spoonley, of Massey University.

"Singapore has a very competitive education system driven by Confucian values and what they think they will get here is a different education value system that offers a more well-rounded education for children."

Immigration New Zealand said the pilot was aimed at working holiday visitors and students, and not skilled migrants, but Professor Spoonley said the Singaporeans who had registered were likely to be either young families with young children, or those who were semi-retired.

Immigration told Singapore media that Singaporeans were targeted because Singapore and New Zealand had long-standing and friendly relations, and that Singapore was a "good demographic match for this campaign, in terms of English language proficiency and education levels, and there's already a strong tradition of studying overseas".

Singapore Club Auckland president Allan Yee said most Singaporeans regarded New Zealand not so much as a study destination but an "excellent place to retire".

"Most Singaporeans have a good retirement nest egg, and they think they will be able to get better-value housing and cars and stretch their money in New Zealand," said Mr Yee.

"I guess New Zealand also offers cheaper university education and that could be one reason why Singaporeans want to come, but Australian universities are still more popular for them."

Since 2001, 2978 Singaporeans have become permanent residents, but 1107, or 37 per cent, are no longer living here.

An Immigration spokesman said the agency did not yet have any information on Singaporeans who had come to New Zealand as a direct result of this pilot project, but it would be evaluated over the next few months.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm...

http://www.newzealandnow.govt.nz/singapore/
Eric Zhang

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#2
Feb 12, 2010
 
The anger of displacement

By Choo Zheng Xi, Editor-at-Large

Why are Singaporeans unhappy, the PAP wonders.

It is said that Singaporeans are a migrant stock. Coming and going, it’s in our blood. My own mother was born and raised in Hong Kong. She met my Singaporean father while he was helping out at my paternal grandmother’s restaurant in Kowloon in the early 80s. And then I was born.

My parents brought me to Singapore in 1988, when I was three years old.

Back then, there were only about 300,000 non-citizen residents in Singapore, out of 3 million people.

All my mother’s blood relatives are still in Hong Kong, but we are Singaporean citizens now. We will always call Singapore our first home.

I still speak only Cantonese with my mother. She came here speaking very little English, but she now speaks decent English and Mandarin (though with a strong Cantonese accent), and some pasar Hokkien that she picked up along the way.

My mother recently retired from her sales position at a 3-for-$10 stall near Raffles City where she happily worked for more than five years. She was tired of competing with the Mainlander that her boss had hired last year, who was willing to work longer for less money.

Mum was hoping to quit after receiving the annual one-month Chinese New Year bonus. The bonus, which her boss usually pays along with her January wages, never came this year. Over the phone, she told me how relieved she was that I’d be starting work at a law firm later this year.

Singapore now has more than 1.7 million foreigners out of 4.99 million people.
Eric Zhang

Singapore, Singapore

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#3
Feb 12, 2010
 
My mother grew to love Singapore at a time when Singapore had more space to grow to love her.

It scares me how little space Singaporeans have been left to integrate foreigners, and how visceral the xenophobic reactions are.

Why are Singaporeans angry, the PAP wonders.

Then there is my paternal granduncle. He was a bookish bachelor, and spoke a crisp Victorian English common among the English-educated of his time. He used to trundle down every weekend to the old National Library at Stamford Road, where he enjoyed reading everything from American thriller novels to Singaporean history books. He was such a loyal library member that the library used to send him commemorative coffee table books on their more significant anniversaries.

He died a few years before they turned the Stamford Library into a tunnel. I guess in a way it was better he never found out, he would never have forgiven them.

Why are Singaporeans angry, the PAP wonders.

If our Ministers took crowded MRTs and buses, ate at neighborhood coffee shops, or worked as front line service staff, they might better understand Singaporeans’ anger.

If they lived like us, ate like us — if they looked at us — they might know.

Singaporeans aren’t inherently xenophobic or hateful, my family will be the first to attest. I trust that Singaporeans can remember a common humanity even as we condemn dehumanizing policies.

But our country is changing so quickly that we now feel overwhelmed and displaced, angry, in a country which is becoming harder and harder to recognize.

It is hard to believe the PAP doesn’t know why Singaporeans are angry, but what does our anger mean to them?

Singapore is increasingly losing our physical and emotional space for love, and soon the only thing we will be able to call ours will be our Anger

http://theonlinecitizen.com/2010/02/the-anger...
Jack Chua

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#4
Feb 19, 2010
 
However, the Straits Times survey also revealed that 53 per cent of Singaporean teens would consider emigration. If the result is truly representative of the aspirations of the young, then Singapore would have a problem. At a time when we are not replacing ourselves through new births, we can ill afford to lose our able sons and daughters.
Any population will shrink if the number of deaths gradually outstrips new births ? this is symptomatic of an ageing society. When coupled with more emigrants leaving the country, the rate of shrinkage will accelerate dramatically. This is not an optimistic picture, and has begun to happen in Japan, which has recorded its very first instance of resident deaths outstripping resident births . Our own population is ageing ? current projections show that one-in-five Singaporeans will be over the age of 65 by 2030. Without more new births, our population will shrink. A declining population will diminish our economic prospects and vitality, compromise our defence capabilities and increase the socio-economic burden for all Singaporeans.
http://app.mcys.gov.sg/web/corp_press_story.a...
Jack Chua

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#5
Feb 19, 2010
 
Singapore – from 3rd world to 1st world to LOST world
October 6, 2009 by admin
Filed under Opinion

Leave a comment

By Cheong Wing Lee, Guest Columnist

It has been 50 years since Singapore has been governed by the PAP under the leadership of Lee Kuan Yew.

Is Singapore better off now than it was 50 years ago?

The answer from most baby boomers is that it is worse. Despite all the gains in materialism and wealth in the country, the majority of the ageing population is feeling no better than five decades ago. Many are stressed out by the anxieties of the absence of a dignified retirement plan, the affordability of healthcare and the uncertain future for their children.

Fifty years ago, Singapore was a British Colony under British rule. The majority of the population neither liked nor disliked the British. They had no opinion and took it as part of life.

During the colonial days, most of the population then were born to accept that the white people were superior. The population then were mostly poor working class, lost without direction and living from day to day.

Fast forward fifty years to present day Singapore and we find the majority of the ageing population also neither like nor dislike the PAP and can’t do anything about it. Most of them were born to accept that the “Men in White” are superior.

The PAP has over the years designed policies and safe guards to ensure that the party remains in power indefinitely. The indiscriminate use of the ISD, rezoning of constituencies, formation of GRCs, monopoly of the mass media and liberal use of defamation lawsuits against opponents practically destroyed all oppositions.

The aging population are generally poor, lost without direction and like the population fifty years ago, living from day to day, praying that their savings will be adequate for a decent retirement.

To PAP’s credit, during the past fifty years,the old guards of the PAP and MM Lee manage to bring Singapore from an improvised third world country to the first world status.

I remembered I was then living in a small rented room in a Chinatown shop-house with only one kitchen, one make shift bathroom and one pull out bucket toilet. The shop-house was shared with 4 other families with a total of 22 occupants.

Within fifteen years I was able to buy a 5 room HDB apartment and own a car. For that I was grateful to the PAP, especially the old guards.

Back then in the seventies, Singapore was bustling with economic activities brought about by Dr. Goh Keng Swee, then Deputy Prime Minister, who led the Singapore industrial revolution.

For the next few decades, Singapore was hailed by the world as an economic miracle . A country without natural resources and yet able to propel itself from 3rd world status to 1st world status with one of the highest per capita in Asia.

The country achieved so many “Number Ones”, i.e. No 1 airport, No.1 container port, No.1 airline, etc, etc. that I lost count. We were proud as citizens of Singapore.

We were proud of the PAP and we were proud of MM Lee. Many of us would have died for the country and him. MM Lee would have left a great legacy for generations to remember.

Ironically the past two decades had eroded that admiration. The addiction of absolute power has made MM Lee developed a deep craze to perpetuate his control of Singapore. It was no longer our country.

Singapore has become his country, his personal property. Our pledge for justice and equality for all is only but an aspiration according to him. To MM Lee, only he and the PAP can effectively govern Singapore.
Jack Chua

Singapore, Singapore

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#6
Feb 19, 2010
 
All others outside of PAP with opposing views are treated as Public Enemies. Under the disguise of self renewal and recruiting new blood, the entire group of old guards were retired except for himself. He brought in young bureaucrats, technocrats, and scholars who will obey and above all fear him without questions.

This dream team and MM Lee initiated a series of social engineering. MM Lee’s dream is to create a perfect society based on meritocracy. There will be no room for complacency. He wants Singaporeans to be the best of the best.

In the process of social engineering, Singapore becomes a nanny state where the government dictates to its citizens what, how and when to do in every minute aspect of their lives. The ideal dreams of the ordinary citizens turned to nightmares. The citizens are hard pressed to perform to the government’s requirements.

The education system was revamped time and again to filter and segregate the slow learners from the ordinary and the brightest students at a young age.

The brightest students are given the best education, priorities and scholarships with promise of top government jobs and top salaries upon completion of their studies.

These super students are primed to be future leaders of the country. The slow learners and the ordinary students are thrown to the lower rungs of the food chain.

The numerous new education policies cause panic amongst parents who do not want their children to be labeled as slow learners or mentally challenged.

There is a huge surge for private tuition whereby children are forced to endure hours of extra studies to keep up or be one step ahead of the others in their pursuit of academic excellence. The joy and happiness of growing up as children was robbed.

There was no time for children to be simply children. The segregation system is based on an unscientific assumption that if students do not perform well in examinations, they will not do well in all aspects of their lives.

Maids are hired by almost every household in order for parents and children to devote more time to studies. The repercussion of the overuse of maids results in a generation of children not knowing how to do simple chores like boiling water, washing dishes, cleaning, hanging a picture frame, changing a tyre, etc. Few children learn or do anything outside of textbooks. The children are simply not street smart.

Perhaps the biggest mistake was the “STOP AT TWO” or “Two is Enough” campaign where citizens were encouraged to stop at only having two children by curtailing all medical benefits and educational privileges of the third child.

The successful campaign resulted in a sharp drop in birth rate and a mass exodus of emigrants who have more than two children. Even more severe repercussions surfaced two decades later resulting in the present huge influx of more than one million “Foreign Talents”, mainly from China and India.

Just when the local citizens thought that they have met the worst by working as janitors, food courts cleaners and other low paying jobs, they are now challenged by foreign talents from China and India who are prepared to work for less.

This challenge now spread to include regular higher paying jobs like engineers, surveyors, healthcare workers, etc which are traditionally held by local born Singaporeans.
Jack Chua

Singapore, Singapore

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#7
Feb 19, 2010
 
Companies are openly advertising and recruiting the new foreign talents in preference to the locals. The reason being that companies need to stay competitive and be more profitable.

New immigrants or foreign talents are not burdened by national service and reservist duty which put additional cost to the companies. Furthermore, new immigrants are willing and able to work for less pay and longer hours since most of them come to Singapore by themselves and have no family obligations like the locals.

The entire working environment is working against the local born Singaporeans. All of a sudden they have become strangers in their own land.

The country they have sworn to protect has betrayed them. In desperate times like this, when help and reassuring words from the government should be forth coming, instead the local Singaporeans receive advice telling them to lower their expectations. This only add insult to injury.

What the dream team and high salaried ministers fail to understand is that the people cannot go lower than low. Just try to survive on a salary of $2,000 a month or less with a family, then maybe they may understand the plight of the average Singaporeans.

For those frustrated Singaporeans who wants to emigrate to other countries to escape their present hopeless predicament, they are walking into another brick wall.

Unknown to most of them, new emigrants to countries like Australia and Canada are also foreign talents who have recently obtained their Singapore citizenship. It must be heart breaking for locals to find out that even the last escape route from their desperate predicament is being challenged by foreign talents who use Singapore as a stepping stone.

There are potential problems looming on the horizon with this huge influx of foreign talents, permanent residents and newly minted Singaporeans. The total number is between 1.6 million to 2 million people under these categories.

These people have no allegiance to the country. Their allegiance is to money. If they do not get employment, they will not get the money to send back to their countries to help their families.

The local born Singaporeans are largely of the “kaisu and kaisi” non-violent type who only complain but continue to vote in the same government election after election. However, the new immigrants are more vocal and hostile. These people will not be easily intimidated and bullied by the authority. The threat of jail to them is like going to a holiday camp with free food and shelter. They have endured much harsher penalties and hardships in their own countries. They are battle hardened and not afraid of dying.

If these people do go on protest riots, it will be a security nightmare. Logistically, the police does not have enough manpower to cope with such numbers. Singapore has less than 10,000 regular policemen. Each policeman has to deal with 200 violent protesters. No matter how efficient the policemen are, it is an impossible task even if the reservist NS are called in to help.

On the assumption that these people are contained, there are simply not enough jails to lock them in. Changi Prison will have to be increased at least one hundred times in size. The government has only one solution and that is to keep them constantly employed to maintain peace.

So when it comes to the question of whether Singapore is better now than it was 50 years ago, should we be surprised at the answer?

http://www.temasekreview.com/2009/10/06/singa...
Jack Chua

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#8
Feb 19, 2010
 
May 21, 2009
Better work-life balance wanted
By Yang Huiwen

WOMEN in the accounting and finance sector want a better work-life balance and a more level playing field with men when it comes to promotions.
The findings stem from a survey of more than 700 female professionals in the public and private sectors in Singapore.

Almost 60 per cent cited work-life balance as their top priority, outweighing other concerns such as opportunities for advancement, job security and skills upgrading.

And of that 60 per cent, 61 per cent were under 35 years old. About 53 per cent of those polled said they would leave their current job for one that offered a better work-life balance, even if it meant less pay.

If anything, the work-life balance is going the wrong way. About 75 per cent of those surveyed are working longer hours compared with a year ago, mainly because they have to shoulder more responsibilities and a bigger workload.

The survey, which was conducted by the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants and global financial recruitment firm Robert Half Singapore, also found that 39 per cent of companies do not have any female directors.

Robert Half managing director Tim Hird said this shortfall indicates that the glass ceiling still exists in the local workplace.

'We thought companies would be doing a lot more, considering the large presence of multinational corporations in Singapore,' he said.

The lack of equal opportunities for women is also underscored by the fact that only 49 per cent of the women surveyed claim their organisations have a formal equal opportunity policy.

In a separate global survey, Singapore was ranked 84th out of 130 countries in terms of equality for women last year.
Confucius

Bangkok, Thailand

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#9
Mar 18, 2010
 
It would appear that the PAP has done such a good job that its opponents are only left with xenophobia in order to try to gain some support. They fail to realise that Singaporeans are also descendent from immigrants, and depend on the outside world for their continued well-being. With xenophobia, Singapore is doomed. Without new immigrants, Singapore is doomed and might as well become an Indonesian island. If ever those xenophobes get into government, Singaporeans face a hellish future, and nobody would come to their rescue.
A dog named Boo

Singapore, Singapore

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#10
Mar 18, 2010
 
Confucius is wrong. Singaporeans are not against immigration or foreigners per se. It is the pace, scale and quality of migrants that frightens and irks Singaporeans in general. We are frustrated with how the inflow is handled. People who do not know the language, culture,, history and behavioural norms of Singapore are fast tracked to be INSTANT CTIZENS. These include massuers, con artists, unemployables etc.

It took decades of nation building and more than a century of living together that the major races in Singapore managed to curve out some understanding and build a local culture among ourselves. We had our misunderstandings and race riots too. Now we are jointly facing something new and strange to us.

Since Confucius is writing from Bangkok, let me give some quick examples of the cause of our irritations:

1. One third of the 5 million people in our tiny island are foreigners (exclude tourists, illegals, temperory social visitors etc). Which country has this high proportion of foreigners competing for limited facilties. From prostitutes in Geylang to waiters in coffee shops we have to handle foreigners in strange tongues in our our own country.

2. We are not like US, Canada, Australia, UK etc with their large land masses, huge idigenious population, long tradition/history/culture, stable economy, strong military etc. We are a sampan in a large oceon. Once over loaded, we will sink in the mildest storm.

The migrants are not angels either. Here are some examples of their cheekiness:

3. Stay a PR and enjoy the benefits with no responsibilties e.g. no NS, can move on anytime things turn bad. meanwhile speculate in HDB houses.

4. One spouse become Singapore citizen. One spouse citizen of another country. Have the best of both worlds.

5. As a manager, just hire your own relatives or country men. It is so easy to hire foreigners, why even consider hiring Singaporeans. This is especially so in banking.

I can write pages and pages e.g crush on MRT, littering, urinating on void decks, fights, crimes, strange loud languages at night etc. If Confucius can come back to live in Singapore, he will see the changes (for the worse) here. This untenable situation has prompted me, normally a mild mannered tidak apa old man to write this reply to Confucuis.(Ha ha..)
Overseas Singaporean

Canberra, Australia

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#11
Mar 21, 2010
 
Confucius wrote:
It would appear that the PAP has done such a good job that its opponents are only left with xenophobia in order to try to gain some support. They fail to realise that Singaporeans are also descendent from immigrants, and depend on the outside world for their continued well-being. With xenophobia, Singapore is doomed. Without new immigrants, Singapore is doomed and might as well become an Indonesian island. If ever those xenophobes get into government, Singaporeans face a hellish future, and nobody would come to their rescue.
What a load of crap. The only reason parasites like you try to infest this country is because we made something out of it. We don't need new immigrants, we did well enough without so-called FT's with sub-standard skills. I'm getting sick of uppity foreigners running down my people in the country that they built. Be a man. Stay in your own country and try to make something decent out of it instead of coming to ours and trying to leach off us.
Overseas Singaporean

Canberra, Australia

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#12
Mar 21, 2010
 
A dog named Boo wrote:
Confucius is wrong. Singaporeans are not against immigration or foreigners per se. It is the pace, scale and quality of migrants that frightens and irks Singaporeans in general. We are frustrated with how the inflow is handled. People who do not know the language, culture,, history and behavioural norms of Singapore are fast tracked to be INSTANT CTIZENS. These include massuers, con artists, unemployables etc.
It took decades of nation building and more than a century of living together that the major races in Singapore managed to curve out some understanding and build a local culture among ourselves. We had our misunderstandings and race riots too. Now we are jointly facing something new and strange to us.
Since Confucius is writing from Bangkok, let me give some quick examples of the cause of our irritations:
1. One third of the 5 million people in our tiny island are foreigners (exclude tourists, illegals, temperory social visitors etc). Which country has this high proportion of foreigners competing for limited facilties. From prostitutes in Geylang to waiters in coffee shops we have to handle foreigners in strange tongues in our our own country.
2. We are not like US, Canada, Australia, UK etc with their large land masses, huge idigenious population, long tradition/history/culture, stable economy, strong military etc. We are a sampan in a large oceon. Once over loaded, we will sink in the mildest storm.
The migrants are not angels either. Here are some examples of their cheekiness:
3. Stay a PR and enjoy the benefits with no responsibilties e.g. no NS, can move on anytime things turn bad. meanwhile speculate in HDB houses.
4. One spouse become Singapore citizen. One spouse citizen of another country. Have the best of both worlds.
5. As a manager, just hire your own relatives or country men. It is so easy to hire foreigners, why even consider hiring Singaporeans. This is especially so in banking.
I can write pages and pages e.g crush on MRT, littering, urinating on void decks, fights, crimes, strange loud languages at night etc. If Confucius can come back to live in Singapore, he will see the changes (for the worse) here. This untenable situation has prompted me, normally a mild mannered tidak apa old man to write this reply to Confucuis.(Ha ha..)
Your comments are spot on. People of your generation turned this nation from a backward little island into an advanced First World nation, only to live long enough to see Singaporeans become a disenfranchised group thanks to policies which explicity favour foreigners.
Sidek

Singapore, Singapore

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#13
Mar 22, 2010
 
My generation had it tough... I am in my late 40's.
We can't speak Mandarin, but it's a challenge that my generation took in our stride, for we believe in the fortune of Singapore. We could still find decent work. And work hard at it. Upgrade ourselves and got promoted to a decent living. But crisis upon crisis hit us. I was made unemployed, I tried my best to get any job, ANY JOB. With a family to feed, I told myself, survival is more important than status.

But guess what, employers say I am now,
TOO OLD
TOO OVER QUALIFIED
TOO EXPENSIVE - even though i was agreeable to take a smaller pay.

I wonder, my time I served in the army to protect the young nation is not worth it, it seems that way.

I ensured my children, speaks English, Mandarin, French and Singlish... hey I am still proud of being a Singaporean.

Competing on a level playing field I can accept. But these Migrant Economic People who depressed our wages and further dilute the quality of our life is asking to much.

I have lost faith in the govt to see the true picture. So many of my fellow Singaporean have cried for dignity in their own soil is being put away as - a minority view.

I am thankful my late father and mother, who fought in the second world war is not around to see the alien country Singapore have turn out to be.

My hope, my children will continue the fight and bring back this country of mine to its rightful place.

Singapore for Singaporean.
Ex-Singaporean

Singapore, Singapore

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#14
Mar 22, 2010
 
There is no chance that Singaporean will take back their country.

There are too many foreigners. If we don't vote for change, there will be millions more foreigners coming.

It is better for Singaporeans to look for greener pastures overseas.
A dog named Boo

Singapore, Singapore

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#15
Mar 22, 2010
 
To Sidek, I sympathise with you.
Foreigners are given preference over locals. I do not know of any country that practises this. To compound to this, when the foreigners are in, they bring in more foreigners at the expense of the locals. Check the Dept of Statistic website:

Singapore total employment : 2.99 million
Foreigners and PRs employed : 1.78 million
Singapore citizens employed : 1.21 million.

If you minus Singaporeans employed by the govt i.e. all the ministries, armed forces, NS men, police, statutory boards like HDB etc I guess in the private sector Singaporeans comprised only 30% of the work force. Which country has such statistics? We are totally overwhelmed!

I urge Singaporeans to go to Raffles Place MRT to see the pathetic ads placed to plead to employers to hire on merit and be fair (to locals). A UNIQUELY SINGAPORE campaign.
get out now

Singapore, Singapore

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#16
Mar 31, 2010
 
Migration
A people under restructure
As a new population of foreigners settles in, many of Singapore’s own defence-trained talents are moving abroad. By Seah Chiang Nee.
Mar 27, 2010

WHILE Singapore is busy attracting talents from abroad, some 4,500 of its own better-educated citizens may be heading for New Zealand.

This is the other side of the immigration coin that is costing Singapore more dearly in skill losses than larger nations that are losing talents to it.

In a period of just six weeks, New Zealand has succeeded in luring this large number of Singaporeans to sign up to work or settle down there.

Such a large number has come as a surprise for two reasons. One is that the New Zealand is not even a top choice and, secondly, Singapore is said to be recovering from the economic crisis.

“Yet it has got 4,500 Singaporeans to sign up. Imagine what the response would have been had it been offered by Australia or Britain?” a company executive commented.

http://www.littlespeck.com/content/people/CTr...
Confucius

Bangkok, Thailand

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#17
Apr 3, 2010
 
This comment was made by Overseas Singaporean:

"Stay in your own country and try to make something decent out of it instead of coming to ours and trying to leach off us. "

This tells a lot about the IQ level of this overseas Singaporean. He might as well use the same argument against his ancestors / or himself.

I do hope there is only a minority of people in Singapore having that level of IQ. If not, Singapore's future is deeply uncertain, as a small red dot in a sea of green.
Confucius

Bangkok, Thailand

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#18
Apr 3, 2010
 
Rising above those petty family quarrels, I read the following from "RISKS-SINGAPORE/(FACTBOX )By Nopporn Wong-Anan, 1 April 2010"

<<SECURITY

Militants have long had Singapore in their sights -- a Jemaah Islamiyah (JI) plot for multiple attacks was uncovered in December 2001.

RACE, RELIGION AND MIGRANTS

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said in a speech marking national day last year that religious and racial tensions were the biggest potential social faultlines.

The issue is complicated by demographic issues -- the majority Chinese population is growing at a lower rate than minority Malays and Indians.

RELATIONS WITH NEIGHBOURS

Singapore-bashing is a sure-fire way to win political capital in many regional countries. >>
Confucius

Bangkok, Thailand

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#19
Apr 3, 2010
 
Boo mentioned the following about new migrants:

<People who do not know the language, culture,, history and behavioural norms of Singapore are fast tracked to be INSTANT CTIZENS.> Later, he wrote: <Here are some examples of their cheekiness:Stay a PR and enjoy the benefits with no responsibilties.> No comment!

<From prostitutes in Geylang to waiters in coffee shops we have to handle foreigners in strange tongues in our our own country.> Strange tongues? I thought that Mandarin was an official language of Singapore.

<I can write pages and pages e.g crush on MRT, littering, urinating on void decks, fights, crimes, strange loud languages at night etc.> <It took decades of nation building and more than a century of living together that the major races in Singapore managed to curve out some understanding and build a local culture among ourselves. We had our misunderstandings and race riots too.> Oh yes, it does take a bit of time.

<We are not like US, Canada, Australia, UK etc with their large land masses, huge idigenious population, long tradition/history/culture, stable economy, strong military etc. We are a sampan in a large oceon. Once over loaded, we will sink in the mildest storm.> You can always ask new immigrants to return home.

<One spouse become Singapore citizen. One spouse citizen of another country.> Who can blame those new immigrants for getting ready to leave, when faced with such xenophobia!
Get out while you can

Singapore, Singapore

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#20
Apr 3, 2010
 
Mr Goh stressed that Singapore is not alone in attracting foreign talent to sink their roots in the country.

New Zealand has a project to attract Singaporeans to work study and live there.

Currently, some 4,500 Singaporeans had applied for different visas to the country, while statistics from Australia's Immigration Department showed that the country's now home to some 50,000 Singaporeans.

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/singap...

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