REST IN PEACE brother Hugo Chavez

REST IN PEACE brother Hugo Chavez

Created by AbeUG on Mar 5, 2013

10 votes

Click on an option to vote

You are hero

You drastically improved living standard

You are an anti imperialist icon

AbeUG

Martinsville, NJ

#1 Mar 5, 2013
I did not start this topic. It was probably uther imitating me again. They say imitation is the best form of flattery.

“Trust no one in politics.”

Since: Apr 08

Pompano Beach, FL

#2 Mar 5, 2013
AbeUG wrote:
I did not start this topic. It was probably uther imitating me again. They say imitation is the best form of flattery.
Why do you continually create dimwit polls and then deny it? Rather pathetic if you ask me. Perhaps you should talk with a psychologist about your "issues"?
abc

United States

#3 Mar 5, 2013
Vlad Putin is next.
East Asian Cars

Podgorica, Montenegro

#4 Mar 5, 2013
The old Castro is next.....another Commie...lol

Since: Aug 07

Location hidden

#5 Mar 5, 2013
Hugo Chavez was a great latin America leader.

Since: Dec 10

Seattle

#6 Mar 5, 2013
Achievements of Hugo Chavez:
"Poverty-
1996-70%
2010-21%
Extreme poverty-
1996-40%
2010-7.3%
Infant mortality-
1990-25 per 1000
2010-13 per 1000
Under-nutrition percentages
1988-21%
2007-6%

96% of the population now has access to clean water
UN Human Development Index puts Venezuela in place #61 out of 176 countries having increased 7 places in 10 years.
In 2005, UNESCO declared the country free of illiteracy. Venezuela was the second country
in the region after Cuba to have reached this milestone"
----------

Hugo Chavez was great man who served his people well!

Since: Dec 10

Seattle

#9 Mar 5, 2013
It was from his government's decision to spend more on social programs! He created several programs amid at bringing down poverty, attacking illiteracy and increasing access to health services, housing and higher education!

You don't have to like Chavez to admit that he improved the conditions millions in Venezuela live in! Even the The Wall Street Journal admits it, though they minimize it!

What I find confusing is the people who call Chavez a "dictator". Chavez was reelected by a landslide and millions rallied for him during the coup in 2002! His people support him and that's all that matters.

You judge a head of state by how they treat the most vulnerable members of their society!
rio

Bromley, UK

#11 Mar 5, 2013
-Farah- wrote:
What I find confusing is the people who call Chavez a "dictator". Chavez was reelected by a landslide and millions rallied for him during the coup in 2002! His people support him and that's all that matters.
They call him a dictator because he was a populist, and once elected didn't play by the rules like other democratic leaders.

Chavez considered that a presidential mandate from the people was enough, and he governed almost without consideration for any parliament. Venezuela didn't have the "check and balance" a democracy is supposed to have, and the opposition was just completely ignored.
jose marti

West Palm Beach, FL

#12 Mar 7, 2013
Neo Szlachta wrote:
<quoted text>
How much of this was from Venezuelan oil wealth assets rather than Chavez!?
You mean because he did not let the foreign oil companies to have their way and protected Venezuelan sovereignty?
jose marti

West Palm Beach, FL

#13 Mar 7, 2013
rio wrote:
<quoted text>
They call him a dictator because he was a populist, and once elected didn't play by the rules like other democratic leaders.

Chavez considered that a presidential mandate from the people was enough, and he governed almost without consideration for any parliament. Venezuela didn't have the "check and balance" a democracy is supposed to have, and the opposition was just completely ignored.
I disagree.

Chavez played by the rules. In Latin America strong leaders whether from the left or the right tend to...

The only difference is Washington tends to train the right wing... from Somoza to Pinochet to Noriega to...
Small Town America UGX

Pleasantville, NJ

#14 Mar 7, 2013
jose marti wrote:
<quoted text>
I disagree.
Chavez played by the rules. In Latin America strong leaders whether from the left or the right tend to...
The only difference is Washington tends to train the right wing... from Somoza to Pinochet to Noriega to...
Just go to sleep Uthera. Perhaps you will die in your sleep, and be with your communist buddy.

“Wir fliegen du?”

Since: Jul 10

Dusseldorf, Deutschland

#15 Mar 7, 2013
RIP dear comandante:'(
Small Town America UGX

Pleasantville, NJ

#16 Mar 8, 2013
Unlol wrote:
RIP dear comandante:'(
So Unlol, what are you now? A commie or nationalist?

Since: Dec 10

Seattle

#17 Mar 8, 2013
Washington, DC – March 5, 2013 –Congressman José E. Serrano(who represents the poorest district in the nation)

Hugo Chavez was a leader that understood the needs of the poor. He was committed to empowering the powerless. R.I.P. Mr. President.

I met President Chavez in 2005 when he came to my district at my invitation,his focus on the issues faced by the poor and disenfranchised in his country made him a truly revolutionary leader in the history of Latin America. He understood that after 400 years on the outside of the established power structure looking in, it was time that the poor had a chance at seeing their problems and issues addressed. His core belief was in the dignity and common humanity of all people in Venezuela and in the world.

When he visited, President Chavez offered a new type of program to the people of the Bronx. He had harnessed the power of his nation’s oil resources and was using their profits—through Citgo—to enact social spending programs. Now he offered people in the Bronx that were struggling economically the same deal. He would provide home heating oil at a huge discount, provided the savings were reinvested in programs that benefited the underserved and underprivileged. I am proud to report that we have benefited from that program ever since, with millions invested in our community through this program and through a grant program he set up.

Though President Chavez was accused of many things, it is important to remember that he was democratically-elected many times in elections that were declared free and fair by international monitors. Even today, people in North America seem unable to accept that Venezuelans had taken our admonitions to have democracy to heart and elected the leader of their choice. President Chavez carried out the programs that his constituents wanted enacted, and won reelection. This too was revolutionary in the history of Latin America, where coup d’etat have been historically a way of power changing hands—especially during the times of controversial leaders.

President Chavez was a controversial leader. But at his core he was a man who came from very little and used his unique talents and gifts to try to lift up the people and the communities that reflected his impoverished roots. He believed that the government of the country should be used to empower the masses, not the few. He understood democracy and basic human desires for a dignified life. His legacy in his nation, and in the hemisphere, will be assured as the people he inspired continue to strive for a better life for the poor and downtrodden.

“Trust no one in politics.”

Since: Apr 08

Pompano Beach, FL

#18 Mar 9, 2013
-Farah- wrote:
Washington, DC – March 5, 2013 –Congressman José E. Serrano(who represents the poorest district in the nation)
Hugo Chavez was a leader that understood the needs of the poor. He was committed to empowering the powerless. R.I.P. Mr. President.
I met President Chavez in 2005 when he came to my district at my invitation,his focus on the issues faced by the poor and disenfranchised in his country made him a truly revolutionary leader in the history of Latin America. He understood that after 400 years on the outside of the established power structure looking in, it was time that the poor had a chance at seeing their problems and issues addressed. His core belief was in the dignity and common humanity of all people in Venezuela and in the world.
When he visited, President Chavez offered a new type of program to the people of the Bronx. He had harnessed the power of his nation’s oil resources and was using their profits—through Citgo—to enact social spending programs. Now he offered people in the Bronx that were struggling economically the same deal. He would provide home heating oil at a huge discount, provided the savings were reinvested in programs that benefited the underserved and underprivileged. I am proud to report that we have benefited from that program ever since, with millions invested in our community through this program and through a grant program he set up.
Though President Chavez was accused of many things, it is important to remember that he was democratically-elected many times in elections that were declared free and fair by international monitors. Even today, people in North America seem unable to accept that Venezuelans had taken our admonitions to have democracy to heart and elected the leader of their choice. President Chavez carried out the programs that his constituents wanted enacted, and won reelection. This too was revolutionary in the history of Latin America, where coup d’etat have been historically a way of power changing hands—especially during the times of controversial leaders.
President Chavez was a controversial leader. But at his core he was a man who came from very little and used his unique talents and gifts to try to lift up the people and the communities that reflected his impoverished roots. He believed that the government of the country should be used to empower the masses, not the few. He understood democracy and basic human desires for a dignified life. His legacy in his nation, and in the hemisphere, will be assured as the people he inspired continue to strive for a better life for the poor and downtrodden.
It is unfair to suggest the coup is Latin America's traditional way of changing power.

The USA is usually behind such plots to topple progressive leaders in Latin America. They do not do it. We do. If someone is seen as unfriendly to our business interests...

Washington seems to prefer banana republics run by borderline fascists. We have supported a lot of them.

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