FBI says it couldn't spell bomber's name.

Posted in the Russia Forum

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good grief

United States

#1 Apr 23, 2013
Kerry said the two countries were working together to find out more about ties between the suspects brothers Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev their family, and Russia, including the details of a six-month trip Tamerlan took to Dagestan and Chechnya last year, during which time he may have linked up with Islamist insurgents active in the area.

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano told Senators in Washington on Tuesday that her agency was aware of the trip even though Tamerlan's name was misspelled on a travel document. A key lawmaker had said that the misspelling caused the FBI to miss the trip.
good grief

United States

#2 Apr 23, 2013
So, not finding his name, they looked at all the flight manifests to the Czech Republic and reported back, "everything's hunky dory, boss".

“In the cockles of weirdness”

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#3 Apr 23, 2013
good grief wrote:
So, not finding his name, they looked at all the flight manifests to the Czech Republic and reported back, "everything's hunky dory, boss".
LOL!

The #1 reason why I don't believe any elaborate conspiracy theories is because I know that our government is too g-d incompetent to pull off anything like that and get away with it.

“ I'm proud”

Since: Mar 13

Location hidden

#4 Apr 23, 2013
FBI couldn't spell the guy's name?

Its time to get new FBI guys and get rid of the quota types.
good grief

United States

#5 Apr 23, 2013
Maybe they should have hired a Russian to program their search algorithms. You know, somebody like Sergei Brin. Billions thrown at the problem and they could have just used Google search, that automatically offers spelling variants in its search window.

Never underestimate government sector intelligence.

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#6 Apr 23, 2013
Proud Russian wrote:
FBI couldn't spell the guy's name?
Its time to get new FBI guys and get rid of the quota types.
Romanizing Cyrillic is always problematic.

How does one REALLY spell anything?

Since: May 08

Kiev-Moscow-St.Peterburg

#7 Apr 23, 2013
Is any difference between "Czechia" and "Chechnia" ?

Ehh! Almost the same!
Cheech

United States

#8 Apr 24, 2013
Czechia doesn't exist. Czekhia does.
Cheech

United States

#9 Apr 24, 2013
snyper wrote:
<quoted text>
Romanizing Cyrillic is always problematic.
How does one REALLY spell anything?
That's not the main issue. The problem is the average Americans lack of sophistication. There's not a French or Spanish place name in America that isn't mispronounced, mangled or generally made mince meat of. We're just one step above the Brits' battle with Don 'Quick-set'. Not only was Chechnya often converted to the Czech Republic but Tsarnaev was reduced to Sarnoff on more than one occasion in the media. Maybe they thought he was Jewish?

I don't think there's a diphthong in existence that the average American doesn't trip over. ;-)

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#10 Apr 24, 2013
Cheech wrote:
<quoted text>
That's not the main issue. The problem is the average Americans lack of sophistication. There's not a French or Spanish place name in America that isn't mispronounced, mangled or generally made mince meat of. We're just one step above the Brits' battle with Don 'Quick-set'. Not only was Chechnya often converted to the Czech Republic but Tsarnaev was reduced to Sarnoff on more than one occasion in the media. Maybe they thought he was Jewish?
I don't think there's a diphthong in existence that the average American doesn't trip over. ;-)
I don't think the blogosphbere and twitterheads qualify as the American "media". lol

Still, you're not far off.
neutral observer

Lake Worth, FL

#11 Apr 24, 2013
snyper wrote:
<quoted text>
Romanizing Cyrillic is always problematic.

How does one REALLY spell anything?
Not true. Russian names are easier than Polish ones precisely because they do use the Cyrillic alphabet.

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#12 Apr 24, 2013
neutral observer wrote:
<quoted text>
Not true. Russian names are easier than Polish ones precisely because they do use the Cyrillic alphabet.
So, is it really "Chesnikov" or "Tsesnikov", "Czar" or "Tsar"?
mxlplx

United States

#13 Apr 24, 2013
snyper wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't think the blogosphbere and twitterheads qualify as the American "media". lol
Still, you're not far off.
No exaggeration. Those examples were straight from main media channels.
mxlplx

United States

#14 Apr 24, 2013
snyper wrote:
<quoted text>
So, is it really "Chesnikov" or "Tsesnikov", "Czar" or "Tsar"?
I'd assume the first two would both be valid yet distinct surnames, with different cyrillic spellings.

"In the United States, czars are generally executive branch officials appointed by the President either with Senate approval or without it. Some appointees outside the executive branch are called czars as well. Specific instances of the term are often a media creation."

Americans typically pronounce it Zar, so the C is superfluous. Not only diphthongs but adjacent consonants can be a problem in English.
Cheech

United States

#15 Apr 24, 2013
1) Drug Baron

2) Drug Czar

3) Drug Kingpin

Which one works for the government?

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#16 Apr 24, 2013
mxlplx wrote:
<quoted text>
I'd assume the first two would both be valid yet distinct surnames, with different cyrillic spellings.
"In the United States, czars are generally executive branch officials appointed by the President either with Senate approval or without it. Some appointees outside the executive branch are called czars as well. Specific instances of the term are often a media creation."
Americans typically pronounce it Zar, so the C is superfluous. Not only diphthongs but adjacent consonants can be a problem in English.
Nope. Two different renderings of the name of the same composer.
mxlplx

United States

#17 Apr 24, 2013
snyper wrote:
<quoted text>
Nope. Two different renderings of the name of the same composer.
What do you mean 'Nope"?

Chesnikov would be one valid surname

Tsesnikov would be another valid surname

Each would differ in the first letter.('Ch' as one and 'Ts' as another)

Besides, the composer is Chesnokov, not Chesnikov.

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#18 Apr 24, 2013
mxlplx wrote:
<quoted text>
What do you mean 'Nope"?
Chesnikov would be one valid surname
Tsesnikov would be another valid surname
Each would differ in the first letter.('Ch' as one and 'Ts' as another)
Besides, the composer is Chesnokov, not Chesnikov.
Conceded, though I've seen the spellings intermixed. It isn't only Americans who misspell their own language.

Let's try:

"Cheremetiev" or "Sheremetiev"?
mxlplx

United States

#19 Apr 24, 2013
Obviously, Sheremetiev. Sh and Ch are two distinct letters and two distinct sounds.

One doesn't pronounce chai as shy, does one?

Since: Mar 09

Location hidden

#20 Apr 24, 2013
mxlplx wrote:
Obviously, Sheremetiev. Sh and Ch are two distinct letters and two distinct sounds.
One doesn't pronounce chai as shy, does one?
Yet both appear as alternative romanizations of the same composer's name, in many and varied sources.

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