Do you like Salsa music? Tell us about it!

Created by Dave Lopes on Apr 20, 2008

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“Go ahead try and hurt me,”

Since: Apr 08

it will only make me stronger.

#2 Apr 20, 2008
Origins of Salsa the Puerto Rican Influence
by Paul F. Clifford
Salsa has origins in Cuban music but credit for it's worldwide popularity belongs to the Puerto Ricans of New York!
The popularity of Salsa throughout the world, is indirectly a consequence of American economic and social imperialism (MacDonalds, Coca Cola, TV, movies, music etc) but in this case, it is probably a good thing!
Musically, Salsa has its roots firmly based in the Afro-Spanish musical traditions of Cuba but its worldwide popularity should be attributed to the Puerto Ricans of New York. For Non-Latinos, our knowledge of Latin Culture and Music comes from American movies and in most cases that means Puerto Rican experience as depicted in them. Often, the first time we heard the music, it was in the backing track of a movie. It was probably even a movie that motivated us to go to a Latin nightclub for the first time!
Between 1915 and 1930 around 50,000 Puerto Ricans migrated to the USA. However, between 1940 and 1969 an additional 800,000 Puerto Ricans also migrated to the USA (especially to New York City). It can't be a coincidence that this is the same period that interest in Latino musical styles increased throughout the world. This is the period when Mambo, Cha Cha, Rock'n'Roll, Bomba, Boogaloo and other dances dominated the dance floor!
The dominance of Puerto Ricans over New York (North American) Latin culture can be attributed to the fact that Puerto Rico is a US protectorate. The Jones Act (1917) made Puerto Ricans citizens of the USA. Thus Puerto Ricans being able to move freely between the mainland and their island, have also been able to more freely introduce Latin culture into America while maintaining and staying in touch with their own identity and heritage. I would even suggest that America's attempt to Americanise Puerto Rico has just made the Puerto Ricans even more determined to cling to their identity and that for them, Salsa has become the unifying force that binds their homeland and its annex in New York. It is said that there are more Puerto Rican Salsa clubs in New York than there are in Puerto Rico.

“Go ahead try and hurt me,”

Since: Apr 08

it will only make me stronger.

#3 Apr 20, 2008
When the Puerto Ricans migrated to New York, they often encountered a struggle for life in the ghettos. The only escape from the frustrations of their daily lives was through the traditional music of their homeland - the "Bomba y Plena". Plena is a uniquely Puerto Rican style that deals with contemporary events, it is often referred to as "el periodico cantado" (the sung newspaper). This Puerto Rican musical form, might account for the popularity, throughout the 1960s, of a style of salsa called "musica caliente". Popular artists used lyrics that told a story about the struggles experienced by an average Puerto Rican in New York. Other artists expressed more emotional feelings about their aspirations for the future, the patriotism towards their country, and romance. Many artists, who came from El Barrio (east Harlem and parts of the Bronx), used another uniquely Puerto Rican genre - "Bomba". Through this aggressive Afro-Caribbean beat they expressed their frustration with the conditions they were living in. These musical forms began the modernisation of the 1950s Mambo, which has led to the creation of the Salsa.
By the late 1970's, popular demand for Salsa Caliente dropped significantly. A new generation of listeners and artists started to emerge and salsa abandoned its portrayals of barrio reality in favor of sentimental love lyrics. This new sub-genre of salsa is known as "Salsa Romantica". Salseros such as Eddie Santiago, Luis Enrique, and Lalo Rodriguez were amoung the first artists to begin this transition from musica caliente to musica romantica. Today, Salsa Romantica maintains its popularity with its new wave of stars such as Marc Anthony, La India, Jerry Rivera, and Victor Manuelle attracting old as well as young salsa fans around the world.
Jazz styles occurred.
Big band leaders, such as Puerto Rico's Tito Puente and Tito Rodriguez and Cuba's Machito, expanded the mambo section of the son, creating a new style of music and they can be credited with forming the musical foundation for the creation of Salsa.
Until the US severed diplomatic relations with Cuba in 1962, the New York and Cuban musicians continually interacted, forming parallel Latin music styles. After 1962, New York based music began incorporating the inspiration of the world around them, forming a distinctively New York Latin style that is dominated by influences from Puerto Rico.
From 1962, Puerto Rico became the only place in the world that (had access to and) was recognised by the American music market as having a connection with the music. Since the 1970s Puerto Rico has claimed the music as its own and dominates the Latin music market.
The term salsa, much like the term jazz, is simply a word used to describe a fusion of different rhythms. It was invented at the end of the 1960s to market Latino music and thanks to the New York Puerto Ricans has gained a following throughout the Latino and Non-Latino world. Cuba might own the musical heritage but the credit of taking it to the world should be given to the people of Puerto Rico who now preserve it and promote it as a globally popular tradition.
This is not a definitive essay but is a collage of impressions I have obtained from consulting over a hundred web sites on Music history, Cuban history and Peurto Rican history.

“Go ahead try and hurt me,”

Since: Apr 08

it will only make me stronger.

#4 Apr 20, 2008
List of Famous Cubans and famous Puerto Ricans who have not only made much music great but have also contribute greatly to the arts of this world besides many other things too. See it for yourself as many other Latino immigrants have done much in this world too that also needs to be recognized as we are not all gang bangers or druggies as some US films depicts many of us and racists love to run with it. We are a people on the move and we will make sure we keep it that way as friends and allies of America.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Cubans

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_famous_P...

“Go ahead try and hurt me,”

Since: Apr 08

it will only make me stronger.

#5 Apr 20, 2008
Para nuestro Puerto Rico, nuestros Puerto Riquenos y para todos aquellos que no nos conoscan mucho mejor en nuestra "Isla del Encanto". Quisieramos ser queridos asi como todo ser humano decea ser queridos y aceptados en este mundo ya que en este mundo algunas personas pueden ser tan cruel con nosotros los Boricuas sin conocernos mejor en Nuestra "Isla del Eden".
& http://www.youtube.com/watch...
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
http://www.youtube.com/watch...

“Go ahead try and hurt me,”

Since: Apr 08

it will only make me stronger.

#6 Apr 20, 2008
This is the Puerto Rican Salsa Style of dancing here by one of our very own, Frankie Martinez.

&mo de=related&search=

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankie_Martinez

“Go ahead try and hurt me,”

Since: Apr 08

it will only make me stronger.

#7 Apr 20, 2008
Juan

Bear, DE

#8 Apr 20, 2008
I think it's just great. It's amazing that it's equally infectious for dancing as it is just for listening.

Many of the lyrics are thoughtful and passionate. Héctor Lavoe arrived in NYC just when the salsa movement was about to happen. He and Willie Colón played a major role.

I hope we get to talk more about Héctor on this thread. People have mixed feelings about him. But as a sonero, I put him close to the top. I think if we listen closely to his phrasing and his passion, he can just leave a listener amazed.
Juan

Bear, DE

#9 Apr 20, 2008
Me imagino que muchos que han participado en los otros hilos no vendrán a visitar aquí. Es probable que no les vaya a interesar mucho de lo que vamos a compartir aquí.

Que no vengan sólo para molestar. A lo mejor tendrán algún comentario serio.

Since: Nov 07

Hayward, CA

#10 Apr 20, 2008
Dave Lopes wrote:
Here are some samples of Salsa music which is now very famous all over the world. Many people are dancing to it's exciting rhythms and it's luscious sexy movements everyday in every country on planet earth.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =aLKrQ385S7kXX&feature=rel ated
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Dave, thanks for starting this thread. It will be nice to have a peaceful and enjoyable thread. As a child, I was raised in a christian home. I was never introduced to this beautiful music. But like they say in spanish, "la sangre llama". In this case, I feel like our tropical music IS in my blood.

Thanks again. I wish everyone a beautiful Sunday afternoon.

“Go ahead try and hurt me,”

Since: Apr 08

it will only make me stronger.

#11 Apr 20, 2008
R Rivera wrote:
<quoted text>
Dave, thanks for starting this thread. It will be nice to have a peaceful and enjoyable thread. As a child, I was raised in a christian home. I was never introduced to this beautiful music. But like they say in spanish, "la sangre llama". In this case, I feel like our tropical music IS in my blood.
Thanks again. I wish everyone a beautiful Sunday afternoon.
Hola!!

Si la tienes en la sangre como la tenemos todos, aqui hay mas salsa todavia pero con un poquito de la salsa vieja para meditar y bailar.

Un poquito de la Salsa dura vieja para todos, ecuchen y comenten ya que yo no soy nignun experto de lo que me gusta tanto.

Orquesta Lebron brothers


Willie Colon/ Hector Lavoe
http://www.youtube.com/watch...

Aguanille.
http://www.youtube.com/watch...

Los Tres Bravos Del Piano Fania All Stars
http://www.youtube.com/watch...

Ismael Miranda...Borinquen tiene Mountuno:
http://www.youtube.com/watch...

“GOD IS AWESOME!!!!!!!”

Since: May 07

DON'T DREAM IT'S OVER.........

#12 Apr 20, 2008
Here is some Cuban Charanga and Colombian Vallenato mixed together; but the song is originated in Venezuela.

Juan

Bear, DE

#13 Apr 20, 2008
Dave Lopes wrote:
<quoted text>Hola!!
Si la tienes en la sangre como la tenemos todos, aqui hay mas salsa todavia pero con un poquito de la salsa vieja para meditar y bailar.
Un poquito de la Salsa dura vieja para todos, ecuchen y comenten ya que yo no soy nignun experto de lo que me gusta tanto.
Orquesta Lebron brothers
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =MG6pT9v_qZwXX
Willie Colon/ Hector Lavoe
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Aguanille.
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Los Tres Bravos Del Piano Fania All Stars
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Ismael Miranda...Borinquen tiene Mountuno:
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Eso sí está en algo. Es que los conjuntos de la salsa tienen tremendos músicos. Y como muchos de ellos son muy capaces de tocar "jazz", son músicos, de verdad.

Estos percusionistas están bien metidos en la tradición afro-cubana. Este conjunto de Willie Colón tenía a José Magual, Jr. y a Milton Cardona, quienes añadieron mucho al sonido de la música de Willie. Y ya mencioné a Héctor Lavoe. Esta combinación estaba bárbara.

Desde que salió esa película con Marc Anthony y J Lo sobre la vida de Héctor, he vuelto a escuchar de nuevo la música de él...con Willie Colón, y como líder de su propio orquesta. Y me gusta más que nunca.

Si a alguien le gusta la salsa, y no tiene un buen conocimiento de Héctor Lavoe, vale la pena chequearlo.
Juan

Bear, DE

#14 Apr 20, 2008
(corrección: propia orquesta)

“Go ahead try and hurt me,”

Since: Apr 08

it will only make me stronger.

#15 Apr 20, 2008
Juan wrote:
<quoted text>
Eso sí está en algo. Es que los conjuntos de la salsa tienen tremendos músicos. Y como muchos de ellos son muy capaces de tocar "jazz", son músicos, de verdad.
Estos percusionistas están bien metidos en la tradición afro-cubana. Este conjunto de Willie Colón tenía a José Magual, Jr. y a Milton Cardona, quienes añadieron mucho al sonido de la música de Willie. Y ya mencioné a Héctor Lavoe. Esta combinación estaba bárbara.
Desde que salió esa película con Marc Anthony y J Lo sobre la vida de Héctor, he vuelto a escuchar de nuevo la música de él...con Willie Colón, y como líder de su propio orquesta. Y me gusta más que nunca.
Si a alguien le gusta la salsa, y no tiene un buen conocimiento de Héctor Lavoe, vale la pena chequearlo.
El Cantante de los cantantes:

Hector Lavoe:

“Go ahead try and hurt me,”

Since: Apr 08

it will only make me stronger.

#16 Apr 20, 2008
Marimercy wrote:
Here is some Cuban Charanga and Colombian Vallenato mixed together; but the song is originated in Venezuela.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =vWjQ4QcoUB8XX
Roberto Torres, uno de loas viejos originales de la Salsa tambien que se hiso en Colombia, NYC y Miami..

Eso si es musica tambien caballero.
Juan

Bear, DE

#17 Apr 20, 2008
That was a really nice youtube clip (Roberto Torres).

“Go ahead try and hurt me,”

Since: Apr 08

it will only make me stronger.

#18 Apr 20, 2008
Otro de los viejos Salseros. Pete El Conde de Puerto Rico.

Que Rico!!!

&fe ature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch...

http://www.youtube.com/watch...

http://www.youtube.com/watch...

Celia Cruz (Cubana) con Johnny Paccheco (Dominicano)

Quimbara http://www.youtube.com/watch...

“Go ahead try and hurt me,”

Since: Apr 08

it will only make me stronger.

#19 Apr 20, 2008
Celia Cruz (Cuba) con Pete El Conde (Puerto Rico).

&NR =1

“GOD IS AWESOME!!!!!!!”

Since: May 07

DON'T DREAM IT'S OVER.........

#20 Apr 20, 2008
With all due respect including my Cuban people; the best salsa and merengue musicians in my humble opinion are the Boricuas. When I go to the salsa festivals is when I truly forget about all my problems playing Maracas, singing and dancing.

WEPA!!!!!!
Juan

Bear, DE

#21 Apr 20, 2008
Marimercy wrote:
With all due respect including my Cuban people; the best salsa and merengue musicians in my humble opinion are the Boricuas. When I go to the salsa festivals is when I truly forget about all my problems playing Maracas, singing and dancing.
WEPA!!!!!!
Yeah. Even though the music is largely rooted in the Afro-Cuban tradition and jazz, salsa would not be salsa without the boricua involvement.

Let's face it....we pay due respect to that which paved the way. It's like in American music. Without the Black involvement who knows where the music would be. And that goes for jazz, as well.

Dizzy Gillespie (African-American) and Chano Pozo (from Cuba) were major contributors to the birth and development of Latin jazz. Some twenty years later the concept of salsa came to fruition. And (in my opinion), just like jazz, it still today has a hot, fresh, and exciting sound. With all due respect to all the new music, I still place salsa well above most of it.

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