Do you like living in Puerto Rico?

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PuraVida

Eagle Mountain, UT

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#1
Feb 8, 2009
 

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We may end up moving to Puerto Rico for business. We're from California but don't speak a lot of Spanish. We like ocean activities and the beach, but not sure how we'd like living there in PR. How is it to live there for US citizens?
Meh

Winnipeg, Canada

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#2
Feb 8, 2009
 

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We're planning the same thing, but we are saving money to do this in about 4 years. I believe that as long as you have enough money to start u your business and some extra cash for the time it takes for it to stabilize, you will succeed. We plan on making a restaurant with some dishes that aren't usually seen there, so we know we'll do pretty good. I lived there 20 years till last Jan and want to go back, it is awesome, beautiful and such a happy and friendly place, even though there are some problems, it doesn't matter. But yeah, you should learn some Spanish. My gf is working on hers(shes Canadian) what kind of business are you starting?

“friend for life”

Since: Apr 08

Toa Baja, Puerto Rico

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#3
Feb 9, 2009
 

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PuraVida wrote:
We may end up moving to Puerto Rico for business. We're from California but don't speak a lot of Spanish. We like ocean activities and the beach, but not sure how we'd like living there in PR. How is it to live there for US citizens?
First thing is Puerto Ricans are US citizens. Spainish is benefical in business as well as everyday life. Puerto Rican people are like all people there are good and bad, friendly and not so friendly. I'm from Virginia and have lived here for five years. I own my own business here and in the Dominican Republic. I've had no problems living here and have lots of Puerto Rican Friends, To tell you the truth I have more and better friends than I did in the states. As far as activities you can have the best of both worlds, in this I mean, I love the Mountains , My Wife loves the Beach. We both can have what we like all in the same day. Go to the beach in the morning then a 30min drive to the Mountains in the afternoon. There is more to this island then the average tourist gets to see.
PuraVida

Eagle Mountain, UT

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#4
Feb 12, 2009
 

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Meh, what did you like most about PR and where did you live when you were there? What area are you planning to start your restaurant in?
Geturdone, what kind of business do you have and has the recent economic crisis had any significant negative impact on your business/revenue? How's the economy currently in PR and how do you think it will be over the next several years? Is it slightly insulated from the US economy or closely tied? Did PR have the same realestate speculation and leveraging/financing issues that occured here in the states? Even though folks in PR are US citizens, are people moving there from the states regarded any differently? Are they warmly welcomed there for doing business? Thanks.
Meh

Winnipeg, Canada

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#5
Feb 13, 2009
 

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I lived in Mayaguez, in the west of Puerto Rico. Most of my family has lived there, so I grew up in that area. I think it is pretty nice as long as you have a car(well, you need a car most of the time). I never got to enjoy all the beautiful things in the island because I had an eye condition that at that time left me unable to drive.

But some of the things I like:
-The people. There are so many nice and happy people in Puerto Rico. No matter how bad their situation is, they always keep a smile and keep going. Puerto Rico was considered the *happiest place in the world* a few years ago because of that. My family was quite poor, but they still always found a way to laugh and smile. There is a big family connection in Puerto Rico.

There are some annoying people around too, but there are people like that everywhere in the world... I think it is just a matter of being street smart and avoiding certain shady or extremely poor areas.)

-The music... no matter where you go you get to hear that happy upbeat music that makes you want to smile and dance no matter how bad you feel. My mom used to keep a radio in the kitchen going all day long with Christmas music or salsa. My gf went there in Dec 07 and she loved it, and misses it now.

-How you can just reach about any place in the island in less than 3 hours(which I think is nice for any business) like for example, go to the beach in the morning, and then just drive 30 mins up to the mountains. There are so many places you can go and enjoy without having too many people around.

We were planning on having a mobile restaurant(with some Puertorican dishes and some Canadian) in the first year and see how it goes. We will probably choose somewhere in the west, maybe close to Rincon. If not, we would go to the San Juan area, close to the tourist zones. We'll just move around and when we find the perfect spot, we'll then decide for a permanent place for the restaurant.

The economy in Puerto Rico has been on a recession for about 3 years, I believe. But I think that if you are a business owner, and you manage to be original and stand out, you will be successful.

For example, in restaurants, the only people that are closing down are the ones that have opened up something that was out there already(for an example, someone opening a restaurant selling Tacos and Burritos, when there are quite a few already, AND we have Taco Maker and Taco Bell everywhere too).

I have seen quite a few blogs from people moving from the US to Puerto Rico, and opening guest houses or restaurants. There's this one called ca2pr I think. There's another one called VillaOrleans... they moved, and now they have a guest house and an art gallery.

I believe anyone can be successful in Puerto Rico, as long as they try something new and interesting. There are so many opportunities waiting to be taken.

I believe there are more than 20,000 US citizens here, some of them don't even speak Spanish, yet they still are successful. It would help to know some Spanish though, if you want to be able to reach everyone in the island.
Daddy Gringo

Aguadilla, Puerto Rico

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#6
Feb 14, 2009
 

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I have lived on the west in Mayaguez and San German for the last four years. Mayaguez is not the nicest. I mean some areas are great, but businesses are going out all over the place. Casarios and some barrios are horrible. Drugs, crime, ghettos and it can be depressing at times. I know no matter where you go there is this kind of life, but you have beautiful places right next to crime and drugs. Thats why Mayaguez is not a tourist destination. There is nothing there unless you like the zoo, which is very depressing. If you want nice things you have to travel like 3 hours to SJ and 3 hours back if there is no traffic. Which is another thing, traffic is a pain!! As far as the roads go make sure you have a four wheel drive type car. As far as the way things are done get used to waiting. You wait for everything. Doctors, dentist, DMV, Mall, traffic etc. People just love standing in line! People are genuinely nice though. If you make a decent living here and have a house and car, you will be happy. Im happy and I love PR. Don't get me wrong about the negatives. No matter where you go there will be negatives. It is what you are comfortable or can handle it what makes the differnce.

ISA

Since: May 07

New York - born and raised

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#7
Feb 14, 2009
 

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Meh wrote:
We're planning the same thing, but we are saving money to do this in about 4 years. I believe that as long as you have enough money to start u your business and some extra cash for the time it takes for it to stabilize, you will succeed. We plan on making a restaurant with some dishes that aren't usually seen there, so we know we'll do pretty good. I lived there 20 years till last Jan and want to go back, it is awesome, beautiful and such a happy and friendly place, even though there are some problems, it doesn't matter. But yeah, you should learn some Spanish. My gf is working on hers(shes Canadian) what kind of business are you starting?
No matter what your menu is, serve a free side dish of POUTINE....I am Puerto Rican living in London and I've become quite fond of this dish....
As a main coarse, a side dish, a snack.....ISA
Teletuvi

Houston, TX

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#8
Feb 17, 2009
 

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I came to Puerto Rico from Ohio when I was in my teens and to be absolutely honest with you I never want to go back to Ohio. I love the tropical whether. Life is so exciting on the beach I got married here have two kids already in Universities and we showed them life on the beach we even have a beach house in Rio Grande, can't beat that type of living it great. And as said before their are really nice people and bad also but I guess you'll find that everywear the island is small so the bad news runs quickly.

LIFES A BEACH "ENJOY"
Coqui 51

Las Piedras, Puerto Rico

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#9
Feb 17, 2009
 
Puerto Rico is a great place to live! However, when coming from the mainland, knowing that you're still in the United States, you may notice that some of the things on the island are like "second hand". When you experience the best of both worlds (PR and the upper 50), you'll know what I mean.
Coqui 51

Las Piedras, Puerto Rico

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#10
Feb 17, 2009
 

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PuraVida wrote:
We may end up moving to Puerto Rico for business. We're from California but don't speak a lot of Spanish. We like ocean activities and the beach, but not sure how we'd like living there in PR. How is it to live there for US citizens?
Puerto Ricans are US Citizens. You're far from outside the US living in PR. Think of it as Hawai'i, but in Caribbean. Don't worry about the English. Many people here are bilingual.
probchld1953

United States

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#11
Mar 1, 2009
 
Thinking about moving somewhere warm to retire, Is it possible to live in Puerto Rico with a monthly income of less than 2K? Thanks
prexplorer

United States

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#12
Mar 2, 2009
 
Meh wrote:
I believe there are more than 20,000 US citizens here, some of them don't even speak Spanish, yet they still are successful. It would help to know some Spanish though, if you want to be able to reach everyone in the island.
There are 3.9 million U.S. citizens living in Puerto Rico. Perhaps you meant that there are 20,000 U.S. expatriots living there.
prexplorer

United States

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#13
Mar 2, 2009
 
probchld1953 wrote:
Thinking about moving somewhere warm to retire, Is it possible to live in Puerto Rico with a monthly income of less than 2K? Thanks
Yes, you can live there on 2K per month. Sadly, approximately 50% of the islanders live below the U.S. poverty level and they are managing to get by with government assistance. If you can buy a house without having a mortgage, you'll do fine. Utilities are expensive however, i.e, water, electricity. Most of the food is imported and is expensive. You would probably live better in Mexico or Costa Rica on that amount of money. It will go further down there since PR's economy is based on the U.S. economy.
prexplorer

United States

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#14
Mar 2, 2009
 
PuraVida wrote:
We may end up moving to Puerto Rico for business. We're from California but don't speak a lot of Spanish. We like ocean activities and the beach, but not sure how we'd like living there in PR. How is it to live there for US citizens?
A great website on PR is: www.carribeanbusinesspr.com

It gives you update information on the Puerto Rican economy.
PuraVida31

Eagle Mountain, UT

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#15
Mar 4, 2009
 
Daddy Gringo wrote:
I have lived on the west in Mayaguez and San German... Im happy and I love PR. Don't get me wrong about the negatives. No matter where you go there will be negatives. It is what you are comfortable or can handle it what makes the differnce.
What about the eastern side, near Fajardo? Is that a better area with less crime and more of a tourist/resort area that have some of the more well off folks? What's the dating situation like in PR for people from the "states"?
PuraVida31

Eagle Mountain, UT

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#16
Mar 4, 2009
 
Any body here that lives on the east side of PR? Meh, do you have an email address?
Factchecker

Muncie, IN

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#17
Mar 4, 2009
 
PuraVida31 wrote:
<quoted text>
What's the dating situation like in PR for people from the "states"?
If you have any money or a monthly check, you won't have any problem finding someone to date.
PuraVida31

Eagle Mountain, UT

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#18
Mar 4, 2009
 
Coqui 51 wrote:
<quoted text>
Puerto Ricans are US Citizens. You're far from outside the US living in PR.
Correct, I meant "gringo's from the upper 48", ie U.S. ;-)

Since: Feb 09

Humacao, PR/Weston, FL

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#19
Mar 4, 2009
 
PuraVida31 wrote:
<quoted text>
Correct, I meant "gringo's from the upper 48", ie U.S. ;-)
I actually meant to say that "one's not far from living in the US n PR" yees, but to be more fair to HI and AK, upper 50.
PuraVida31

Eagle Mountain, UT

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#20
Mar 4, 2009
 
Coqui 51 wrote:
<quoted text>
I actually meant to say that "one's not far from living in the US n PR" yees, but to be more fair to HI and AK, upper 50.
You're right, I should have said "upper 50"!

But overall, your happy living in PR?

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