Fortuño may have been forced out of office for taxing transnationals.

Posted in the Puerto Rico Forum

Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#1 Nov 16, 2012
The populares do not dare to tax their "golden goose".

These poured millions of dollars into AGP's and the populares campaign.

They always spend hundreds of millions of dls. lobbying against statehood and decolonization.

Romero always wanted to tax them (regardless the economic consequences) for they substituted the absent sugar cane interests of the early USA colonial period (which kept the island prisoner for decades; and became the driving force behind the hundreds of thousands of poor Puerto Rican farmers' migration to the States).
just me

Isabela, Puerto Rico

#2 Nov 17, 2012
I think he was forced out of office because he laid off 40,000 workers soon after he was elected.

Voters do not forget.

Since: Oct 12

West Islip, NY

#3 Nov 17, 2012
just me wrote:
I think he was forced out of office because he laid off 40,000 workers soon after he was elected.
Voters do not forget.
That's my belief as well. It was actually 30,000 workers ... they had wives/husbands, kids, etc who remembered who laid off their spouse or father when they went behind the curtain.

That being said, Fortuno's policies were needed to correct Puerto Rico's path.
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#4 Nov 17, 2012
LongIslander1987 wrote:
<quoted text>
That's my belief as well. It was actually 30,000 workers ... they had wives/husbands, kids, etc who remembered who laid off their spouse or father when they went behind the curtain.
That being said, Fortuno's policies were needed to correct Puerto Rico's path.
Actually it was 11,200 to be exact.

But, nobody dare mess with transnationals (by taxing them) and then, Fortuño came along....(and changed the rules, forever...)...they, also, don't forget...

History will eventually "tell"...
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#5 Nov 17, 2012
LongIslander1987 wrote:
<quoted text>
That's my belief as well. It was actually 30,000 workers ... they had wives/husbands, kids, etc who remembered who laid off their spouse or father when they went behind the curtain.
That being said, Fortuno's policies were needed to correct Puerto Rico's path.
Fortuño did not "fire" one single NPP'er.

Those "fired" were mostly people who didn't vote for him (in his own words).
TPMP

New York, NY

#6 Nov 17, 2012
Heh....You mess with people's "bread and butter"

Then being voted out of office is the end result of what happens.

==========

If the electorate were willing to wait out just one more term with him. It would have gotten a lot botter.

Such is life.

Since: Sep 12

Cayey, Puerto Rico

#7 Nov 17, 2012
Didn't the previous Governor hire 60,000 in the year preceding the 2008 election? I always wondered why he didn't let them all go. Jorge, is your number 11,200 correct, I only heard the 30,000 figure? The problem is, the current ratio of public to private sector jobs is unsustainable. Puerto Rico would be better off, if the public sector was told to stay home and still get paid. As they die off do not replace them. They would no longer clog the highways for the rest of us or run up electric bills by keeping the lights and A/C on 24/7. On the "rock" you can renew your auto registration on-line. Not here, you have to go to 2 different places, stand in 2 lines, why? Just to have a make work area, so a legislator can buy votes. Have you ever looked at the wall of licenses at Costco or Sams? Who do you think pays for that? Do any of them guarantee food safety? Does the alcohol taste better? That wallpaper does nothing other than raise the cost of products we buy. It adds not one cent of value, safety etc.
Qpiensas

Puerto Rico

#8 Nov 18, 2012
Fortuño was able to reduce income tax to Puerto Rico’s resident tax payers through this 4% tax imposed to transnationals. It was an economic relief for everyone who pays for taxes. It is incredible that media high-lightened the 30,000 thousand jobs dismissals but never clarified to the public that at the end around 12,000 people were dismissed from government jobs and not 30,000 as stated at the beginning. In terms of economy I think that Fortuño accomplished many good things but, in the other hand, criminality was not well managed or attended, and that might have played a role in the deciding winning vote.

Since: Oct 12

West Islip, NY

#9 Nov 18, 2012
Qpiensas wrote:
criminality was not well managed or attended, and that might have played a role in the deciding winning vote.
There are more Federal law enforcement personnel in Puerto Rico than ever before ... although still significantly less manpower than a 'border state' would normally receive from the Feds.

Remember, for decades the FBI considered it's San Juan Field Office as if it were a Missoula, Montana with palm trees.

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