Will the federal state of P Rico awaken the US Hispanic Trojan horse?

Posted in the Puerto Rico Forum

Comments
1 - 16 of 16 Comments Last updated Jul 23, 2013
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#1 Jul 21, 2013
Most definite.

In fact, the Hispanic Congressional Caucus will have way more power than any other "minority", with Puerto Rico as a federal state.

Since: Oct 12

West Islip, NY

#2 Jul 22, 2013
You mentioned last night that statehood will happen when "they" need the Hispanics more than the Blacks - and that day is rapidly approaching. I agree with your assessment.
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#3 Jul 22, 2013
LongIslander1987 wrote:
You mentioned last night that statehood will happen when "they" need the Hispanics more than the Blacks - and that day is rapidly approaching. I agree with your assessment.
I don't recall posting the phrase-"...more than the Blacks...", and if memory doesnt fail me, I specifically defined the word "they".

Since: Oct 12

West Islip, NY

#4 Jul 22, 2013
Jorge wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't recall posting the phrase-"...more than the Blacks...", and if memory doesnt fail me, I specifically defined the word "they".
"If US society gets polarized between Hispanics and AA's, then and only then, a Hispanic state would make every sense and with both parties' blessings.

Believe me, a Hispanic state will come to fruition when it suits the interests of the US' power centers."
Sounds pretty close to what I posted.
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#5 Jul 22, 2013
LongIslander1987 wrote:
<quoted text>
"If US society gets polarized between Hispanics and AA's, then and only then, a Hispanic state would make every sense and with both parties' blessings.
Believe me, a Hispanic state will come to fruition when it suits the interests of the US' power centers."
Sounds pretty close to what I posted.
"pretty close" is an interpretation.

My main point is POLARIZATION amongst minorities might bring statehood to PR.

But, not at the expense of our Black fellow citizens, which seems to be your interpretation.

Since: Oct 12

West Islip, NY

#6 Jul 22, 2013
Jorge wrote:
<quoted text>
"pretty close" is an interpretation.
My main point is POLARIZATION amongst minorities might bring statehood to PR.
But, not at the expense of our Black fellow citizens, which seems to be your interpretation.
Alright I see what you ment, my apologizes.

I don't know if you are familiar with California but there is alot of animosity between the Blacks and the Hispanic communities as the Blacks are afraid that the Hispanics are "chasing them out" of their traditional neighborhoods.
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#7 Jul 22, 2013
LongIslander1987 wrote:
<quoted text>
Alright I see what you ment, my apologizes.
I don't know if you are familiar with California but there is alot of animosity between the Blacks and the Hispanic communities as the Blacks are afraid that the Hispanics are "chasing them out" of their traditional neighborhoods.
Mexicans have a great tradition of racism and, sadly, they not only brought it when they immigrated here, but took it to a whole new level when they encountered the US racist tradition.

The old Californios, taking advantage of newly arrived Mexicans intrinsic racism, embraced it in order to form such organizations as La Raza and keep some of their waning power, fastly slipping at the hands of the White Anglo movement.

Interestingly, you can always tell a Californio from an American of Mexican roots.

Californios insist on preserving their Spanish, by speaking and writing it impecabbly.

Americans, of Mexican roots, hardly speak Spanish, they embrace California's culture as soon as they arrive.

Since: Oct 12

West Islip, NY

#8 Jul 22, 2013
Jorge wrote:
<quoted text>
Mexicans have a great tradition of racism and, sadly, they not only brought it when they immigrated here, but took it to a whole new level when they encountered the US racist tradition.
The old Californios, taking advantage of newly arrived Mexicans intrinsic racism, embraced it in order to form such organizations as La Raza and keep some of their waning power, fastly slipping at the hands of the White Anglo movement.
Interestingly, you can always tell a Californio from an American of Mexican roots.
Californios insist on preserving their Spanish, by speaking and writing it impecabbly.
Americans, of Mexican roots, hardly speak Spanish, they embrace California's culture as soon as they arrive.
Many Tejanos are similar. Very proper compared to the 'newcomers' from south of the border.

In fact many 'newcomers' don't even speak Spanish as a first language, most of them speak indigenous languages as a first language.
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#9 Jul 22, 2013
LongIslander1987 wrote:
<quoted text>
Many Tejanos are similar. Very proper compared to the 'newcomers' from south of the border.
In fact many 'newcomers' don't even speak Spanish as a first language, most of them speak indigenous languages as a first language.
Mexico's an entire different galaxy.

I thought that I had an edge due to my Latino roots, but Mexicans break every mold, every conception or pre conceived notion.

Every time I pick a book on Mexican history, it just blows me away.

Their national history is like no other I've come across.

Not even a history expert, who insists on following some chronology based on first source documents, can or is able to keep a certain logical sequence.

Since: Oct 12

West Islip, NY

#10 Jul 22, 2013
Jorge wrote:
<quoted text>
Mexico's an entire different galaxy.
I thought that I had an edge due to my Latino roots, but Mexicans break every mold, every conception or pre conceived notion.
Every time I pick a book on Mexican history, it just blows me away.
Their national history is like no other I've come across.
Not even a history expert, who insists on following some chronology based on first source documents, can or is able to keep a certain logical sequence.
I don't think anything about Mexico makes any sense ...
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#11 Jul 22, 2013
LongIslander1987 wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't think anything about Mexico makes any sense ...
If you ask me, that nation, as well as Colombia are glued with saliva.

There are as many different Mexicos and Colombias as there are regions.

In fact, I once asked my best Cuban friend, whose family lost everything to the Castro regime-if Havana ever exerted any kind of control over the entire nation.

He told me, that throughout its history, even during Spanish times, Havana was never able to control the Santiago region.

Its something you dont find in history books, you have to discover it thru knowlegeable people by chance.

In fact, one night I was out with these Mexicans friends, while in college in Mass. when the Zapatistas rised against the Federal District.

I still remember my chilango friends, chilangos being people from the DF, "...we have never been able to control those savages from Chiapas..."...

There you go....

Since: Oct 12

West Islip, NY

#12 Jul 23, 2013
Jorge wrote:
<quoted text>
I still remember my chilango friends, chilangos being people from the DF, "...we have never been able to control those savages from Chiapas..."...
There you go....
Well said. When Texas revolted in 1836 the bulk of the Mexican Army was busy suppressing a revolt in Chiapas. The 1910 revolutions began in the far north and the far south. Mexico's present drug cartels are all based in the north.

As for Cuba wasent there a big revolt against Castro in the Santiago area sometime immediately before the Bay of Pigs invasion?

Since: Oct 12

West Islip, NY

#13 Jul 23, 2013
In fact the Texans were surprised that Santa Ana was able to get to Texas from southern Mexico so quickly in the middle of what was up until then the worst winter in Texas history.
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#14 Jul 23, 2013
LongIslander1987 wrote:
<quoted text>
Well said. When Texas revolted in 1836 the bulk of the Mexican Army was busy suppressing a revolt in Chiapas. The 1910 revolutions began in the far north and the far south. Mexico's present drug cartels are all based in the north.
As for Cuba wasent there a big revolt against Castro in the Santiago area sometime immediately before the Bay of Pigs invasion?
As a Latin American saying goes, "apparently, order is not one of our priorities".

Since: Sep 12

Location hidden

#15 Jul 23, 2013
Jorge wrote:
<quoted text>
Mexicans have a great tradition of racism and, sadly, they not only brought it when they immigrated here, but took it to a whole new level when they encountered the US racist tradition.
The old Californios, taking advantage of newly arrived Mexicans intrinsic racism, embraced it in order to form such organizations as La Raza and keep some of their waning power, fastly slipping at the hands of the White Anglo movement.
Interestingly, you can always tell a Californio from an American of Mexican roots.
Californios insist on preserving their Spanish, by speaking and writing it impecabbly.
Americans, of Mexican roots, hardly speak Spanish, they embrace California's culture as soon as they arrive.
Jorge,you are so right about this.This perfectly describes my mother's family.Her mother's side speaks Spanish.Only a few from her father's side speaks Spanish.My mom when she was growing up,they were not allowed to Speak in Spanish.Her parents did not want her or her siblings to speak Spanish.They did not want to identify with Mexicans.They were Chicanos NOT Mexicans.
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#16 Jul 23, 2013
Nubeluz wrote:
<quoted text>Jorge,you are so right about this.This perfectly describes my mother's family.Her mother's side speaks Spanish.Only a few from her father's side speaks Spanish.My mom when she was growing up,they were not allowed to Speak in Spanish.Her parents did not want her or her siblings to speak Spanish.They did not want to identify with Mexicans.They were Chicanos NOT Mexicans.
I know this by experience.

The father of my only two nephews is a Californio, on his Dad's side and a Chicano on his Mom's side.

My ex brother in law was caught between two, completely different approaches on how to behave.

Come my sister and his divorce, he let her take the kids out of California, and raise them in Miami where they wouldnt have the problem of being a minority and having to always be explaining themselves to everyone.

Now, my nephews, especially the little one-my godson, who's 18 and about to start college in the fall, encountered an entirely different problem from the one his Dad had growing up in LA and Sacramento.

My sister raised her kids in a gated community where rich Venezuelans set shop as political exiles from the Chavez dictatorship.

Long story, short, the poor guy was bullied for being a Latino and speaking Spanish with an Anglo accent. He had to finish high school at home, because the bullying got way to hard to handle.

That didnt happen to his older brother because he was sent to a magnet school for gifted children in Coral Gables with a diverse student body.

So, all in all, we all have to face the curves life throw the best way we can.

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