The history of Puerto Ricans in Hawaii

The history of Puerto Ricans in Hawaii

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Since: Jun 09

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#1 May 31, 2010
The mestzo prople from Guanica, Borkiken aka Guanica, Puerto Rico, are taken by force to Hawaii in the 1890's
From William R. Cumpano, 24 August 1997

The fascinating story of the Moscoso plan to emigrate thousands of excessive Puerto Ricans from their own homeland brought to mind an interview with history professor Norma Carr of the University of Hawaii, which we of the Puerto Rican Cuatro Project conducted in Waikiki during the taping of our independent video documentary, Un Canto En Otra Montaña: Puerto Rican Music in Hawai'i.

Excerpts from the day-long taped interview on the history of the Puerto Rican Diaspora in Hawaii follow:

http://www.hartford-hwp.com/archives/41/303.h...
Jorge

Bayamon, Puerto Rico

#2 May 31, 2010
1)¿Quién era Guillermo Moscoso?

2) Operation Bootstrap o Plan Moscoso,¿tuvo entre uno de sus puntales la emigración forzosa de cientos de miles de puertorriqueños?

Jorge
Jorge

Bayamon, Puerto Rico

#3 May 31, 2010
"....On August 8, 1899, Hurricane San Ciriaco, with winds of over 100 miles per hour, struck Puerto Rico and, on August 22, another hurricane followed. The floods caused by 28 days of continuous rain damaged the agricultural industry and left 3,400 dead and thousands of people without shelter, food or work.[2] As a result, there was a shortage of sugar from the caribbean in the world market and a huge demand for the product from Hawaii and other sugar producing countries. To meet the demand, plantation owners began a campaign to recruit the jobless laborers in Puerto Rico.[3]..."
Jorge

Bayamon, Puerto Rico

#4 May 31, 2010
"....WHAT WERE THE CIRCUMSTANCES IN HAWAII THAT MADE THEM BRING PUERTO RICANS TO HAWAII?
Okay,[at the turn of the century] the Hawaiian Sugar Planters Association was faced with democracy. The American flag had raised the hopes of all the different labor groups in Hawaii: the Japanese, the Chinese, the Portuguese, the Hawaiians (who were the whole society). Everybody expected things to be better now that the American flag was flying over Hawaii.

In fact, from 1898 until 1900, the Japanese laborers who enjoyed a monopoly on the plantations had forced the wages to go from 50 cents a day to 70 cents a day. And the Hawaiian Sugar Planters Association, which was the oligarchy in complete control over every aspect of life in Hawaii wasn=92t going to tolerate that. So they wanted to bring in an “excess” of labor, so that they would threaten the Japanese with their job security.

And another thing that happened was, they couldn=92t just bring in more Japanese or Chinese because the Exclusion Act, which kept out Chinese from the United States now applied in Hawaii. And the Congress didn't want any more “people of color” coming in. They were pressuring the Congress, the Congress was pressuring the Hawaiian Sugar Planters Association to “whiten” the population.

So Puerto Rico became a convenient place to look for labor, and the Hawaiian Sugar Planters Association had contacts in Puerto Rico, labor brokers who had worked here in Hawaii previously...."
Dennis algarin

Georgetown, TX

#5 May 31, 2010
Hawaii is a example why Puerto Rico should never be
a state. The Hawaiin culture is just a memory. they
lost their identity. when I lived there from 1980-83
the island's major race was Japanese. The last of the
Hawaiins are now fighting to regain what is lost to
them, their sovereignty. Or rather what was taken from them.

Peace
Jorge

Bayamon, Puerto Rico

#6 May 31, 2010
Dennis algarin wrote:
Hawaii is a example why Puerto Rico should never be
a state. The Hawaiin culture is just a memory. they
lost their identity. when I lived there from 1980-83
the island's major race was Japanese. The last of the
Hawaiins are now fighting to regain what is lost to
them, their sovereignty. Or rather what was taken from them.
Peace
What will someone like you do with a sovereign Puerto Rico?
Factchecker

Eugene, OR

#7 May 31, 2010
Jorge wrote:
"....WHAT WERE THE CIRCUMSTANCES IN HAWAII THAT MADE THEM BRING PUERTO RICANS TO HAWAII?
Okay,[at the turn of the century] the Hawaiian Sugar Planters Association was faced with democracy. The American flag had raised the hopes of all the different labor groups in Hawaii: the Japanese, the Chinese, the Portuguese, the Hawaiians (who were the whole society). Everybody expected things to be better now that the American flag was flying over Hawaii.
In fact, from 1898 until 1900, the Japanese laborers who enjoyed a monopoly on the plantations had forced the wages to go from 50 cents a day to 70 cents a day. And the Hawaiian Sugar Planters Association, which was the oligarchy in complete control over every aspect of life in Hawaii wasn=92t going to tolerate that. So they wanted to bring in an “excess” of labor, so that they would threaten the Japanese with their job security.
And another thing that happened was, they couldn=92t just bring in more Japanese or Chinese because the Exclusion Act, which kept out Chinese from the United States now applied in Hawaii. And the Congress didn't want any more “people of color” coming in. They were pressuring the Congress, the Congress was pressuring the Hawaiian Sugar Planters Association to “whiten” the population.
So Puerto Rico became a convenient place to look for labor, and the Hawaiian Sugar Planters Association had contacts in Puerto Rico, labor brokers who had worked here in Hawaii previously...."
The flag of the United States always tows some sort of 'democracy' behind it--except everyone doesn't get to vote.

Transferring the residents of one colony to another is common among imperialists the world over. What would you expect?

Hawaii became a state as a trade to bring Alaska into the union.
Jorge

Bayamon, Puerto Rico

#8 May 31, 2010
Factchecker wrote:
<quoted text> What would you expect?
"expect"????
Dennis algarin

Georgetown, TX

#9 May 31, 2010
someone like me??? Its not up to me, its up to u and
the people of that Island. what would the people do?
aren't you in charge of your own destiny? so why not
the people of Puerto Rico?
Jorge

Bayamon, Puerto Rico

#10 May 31, 2010
Dennis algarin wrote:
someone like me??? Its not up to me, its up to u and
the people of that Island. what would the people do?
aren't you in charge of your own destiny? so why not
the people of Puerto Rico?
Did you post this message?

Dennis algarin wrote:
Hawaii is a example why Puerto Rico should never be
a state. The Hawaiin culture is just a memory. they
lost their identity. when I lived there from 1980-83
the island's major race was Japanese. The last of the
Hawaiins are now fighting to regain what is lost to
them, their sovereignty. Or rather what was taken from them.
Peace

Now, all of a sudden is:

"...you and the people of THAT island..."????

Are you in charge of your own destiny?

Are you a "boricua"????
Dennis algarin

Georgetown, TX

#11 May 31, 2010
I think you have read enough of my posts to know Que
soy Boricua, and for a man with such intellect. you
sure know how to answer questions with question. But
i will answer you. first we retain our culture and
heritage by living it; food,music,politics,speaking
the language and most important of all, we teach our
kids where we come from.
Jorge

Bayamon, Puerto Rico

#12 May 31, 2010
Dennis algarin wrote:
I think you have read enough of my posts to know Que
soy Boricua, and for a man with such intellect. you
sure know how to answer questions with question. But
i will answer you. first we retain our culture and
heritage by living it; food,music,politics,speaking
the language and most important of all, we teach our
kids where we come from.
If you're such a "boricua":

1) What is it that you're doing to retain our culture and heritage?(how do you "live it"?). You hardly post in Spanish, so I guess you don´t speak the language and teach it to your kids.

2) How do you teach your kids where is you come from?

I'm curious!

Remember, when you post a message you can't control the way people are going to react.

The most you can do is lower the level of discussion by getting personal, answer, or ignore the requests altogether.
MataConHacha

Del Rio, TX

#13 Jun 1, 2010
The article is written in a very low level of grammar and writting style. Looks more like a high school student wrote it.

Since: Jun 09

Location hidden

#14 Jun 1, 2010
MataConHacha wrote:
The article is written in a very low level of grammar and writting style. Looks more like a high school student wrote it.
It is an excerpt from an elderly Hawaiian Puerto Rican recounting the experiences and hardships of coming to Hawaii.
MataConHacha

Del Rio, TX

#15 Jun 2, 2010
PRexplorer,

Ah, that explains it! Thanks for clearing that up for me.

Since: Jun 09

Location hidden

#16 Jun 2, 2010
MataConHacha wrote:
PRexplorer,
Ah, that explains it! Thanks for clearing that up for me.
From what I understand most of the 30,000 Hawaiian Puerto Ricans no longer speak Spanish.
Jorge

Bayamon, Puerto Rico

#17 Jun 2, 2010
Prexplorer wrote:
<quoted text>
From what I understand most of the 30,000 Hawaiian Puerto Ricans no longer speak Spanish.
Why do you understand that?

Since: Jun 09

Location hidden

#18 Jun 2, 2010
Jorge wrote:
<quoted text>
Why do you understand that?
It is a figure of speech used in American English indicating that I have heard this, but I am not sure if it is accurate.
Jorge

Bayamon, Puerto Rico

#19 Jun 2, 2010
Prexplorer wrote:
<quoted text>
It is a figure of speech used in American English indicating that I have heard this, but I am not sure if it is accurate.
I know you're figuratively speaking, but I watched (not so long ago) a documentary on Hawaiians, of boricua roots, and many of them speak broken Spanish, play our instruments, watch our high holidays and eat our food (or a good variation of it) like the roasted pig (a la varita) instead of the underground roasting.

Jorge

Since: Jun 09

Location hidden

#20 Jun 2, 2010
Jorge wrote:
<quoted text>
I know you're figuratively speaking, but I watched (not so long ago) a documentary on Hawaiians, of boricua roots, and many of them speak broken Spanish, play our instruments, watch our high holidays and eat our food (or a good variation of it) like the roasted pig (a la varita) instead of the underground roasting.
Jorge
Yes and they even make pasteles. Here is a video where some Puerto Rican descendents are dancing salsa:

Interview with a Hawaiian descendent of an immigrant Puerto family:

&fe ature=related

Hawaiian Puerto Rico children dancing salsa:

http://www.youtube.com/watch...

Puerto Ricans in Hawaii playing Puerto Rican music:

Paranda Hawaiian style:

http://www.youtube.com/watch...

Hawaiian Puerto Ricans playing Guaracha:

http://www.youtube.com/watch...

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