Congress expected to ignore Puerto Ri...

Congress expected to ignore Puerto Rico's vote for statehood

Posted in the Puerto Rico Forum

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#1 Mar 20, 2013
Congress expected to ignore Puerto Rico's vote for statehood - The ...
http://thehill.com/blogs/floor-action/house/2... ...
Nov 8, 2012 ... Puerto Rico's vote to seek statehood with the United States seems historic on its face,... as reason to start considering legislation for Puerto Rico's statehood..... Neiman Marcus settles charges of misleading 'fake-fur' labels ...

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#2 Mar 20, 2013
Congress is likely to respond to Puerto Rico's vote in favor of statehood with stony silence, and is not expected to undertake any effort to make Puerto Rico the 51st state.
Puerto Rico's vote to seek statehood with the United States seems historic on its face, since the island territory had never formally approved such a referendum. But congressional staffers said the numbers behind the vote, plus the related political circumstances under which it occurred, mean few in Congress are expected to see any pressing need to pass legislation related to the island's status.
On the numbers, Puerto Ricans voted 922,374-786,749 against the status quo of the island being a U.S. territory. With that hurdle cleared, 61 percent of voters chose statehood in a second question, and 39 percent picked other options.
But the ballot did not include other non-statehood options, and hundreds of thousands of voters left blank their preferred choice. CNN reported this week that this flaw in the vote could mean that the option of statehood might still garner less than 50 percent of the vote, and could be near the 46 to 48 percent level of support that has been seen in past votes.

Republican and Democratic staffers in the House told The Hill this week that they are fully aware of these details, which is why the vote is not being seen in Congress as reason to start considering legislation for Puerto Rico's statehood. One House aide said the 61 percent vote in favor of statehood is seem by some in Congress as a "statistical fiction."

The political circumstances surrounding the vote are also being seen as real hurdles to making the island a U.S. state. Most importantly, Puerto Rican voters also decided to oust Republican Gov. Luis Fortuno, a strong supporter of statehood.

Fortuno was beaten by Alejandro Garcia Padilla, who wants Puerto Rico to remain a U.S. territory. This means that while Puerto Rico's non-voting Resident Commissioner Pedro Pierluisi (D) will continue to push for statehood in the U.S. Congress, the effort is unlikely to go anywhere.
"The new government doesn't support statehood," one House aide said flatly, speaking of the new governor.

Pierluisi, who won reelection on Tuesday, told reporters this week that the statehood referendum means the U.S. Congress will "have to react." But his office did not respond to a request for comment about whether Pierluisi effectively lost his mandate to keep pursuing statehood when Garcia was elected.
Another House aide said some in Congress see the mandate for statehood as being significantly weakened because some believe it was only raised in an effort by Fortuno to draw more voters into the voting booths to help save his own reelection.

This aide said that perception hurts Puerto Rico's case, since it makes the vote look like an attempt to engineer the outcome of the governor's race, rather than a sincere attempt to seek statehood.
"As a strategy, it failed miserably," this aide added, given that Fortuno lost his race anyway.

Puerto Rico faces other hurdles within the United States. Statehood for the island is an issue that Republicans tend to oppose, which makes it highly unlikely that House Republicans would advance the issue even if Puerto Rico were making a genuine push for this change.
The House voted 223-169 in favor of statehood in 2010, but that vote was held when Democrats controlled the chamber.

It's also unclear whether the Obama administration sees Puerto Rico's vote as an action-forcing event. The Obama administration assembled a task force on Puerto Rico's status, which released a report in 2010 that outlined several status options the island might pursue.
But the administration did not respond to a request for comment on how it sees the vote....

As of this week, at least, it's unclear whether the administration sees the Nov. 6 vote as providing clarity, or muddling the question even further.

Since: Oct 12

Marlboro, NJ

#3 Mar 20, 2013
You really are months behind the curve.

latino.foxnews.com/latino/news/2012/12/05/whi...
"The results were clear, the people of Puerto Rico want the issue of status resolved, and majority chose statehood in the second question," White House spokesman Luis Miranda said in a statement."

On December 5th 2012 the White House acknowledged that the majority of Puerto Ricans voted for statehood.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#4 Mar 20, 2013
LongIslander1987 wrote:
You really are months behind the curve.
latino.foxnews.com/latino/news/2012/12/05/whi...
"The results were clear, the people of Puerto Rico want the issue of status resolved, and majority chose statehood in the second question," White House spokesman Luis Miranda said in a statement."
On December 5th 2012 the White House acknowledged that the majority of Puerto Ricans voted for statehood.
The article discusses that vote and finds it basically flawed.

Since: Oct 12

Marlboro, NJ

#5 Mar 20, 2013
Brainiac2 wrote:
<quoted text>
The article discusses that vote and finds it basically flawed.
I am showing you a later article from after the facts became clear.

Blank ballots do not count, they dident vote for anything. They basically threw their vote away.

Since: Oct 12

Marlboro, NJ

#6 Mar 20, 2013
"In a second question on the referendum, the majority of those who expressed an opinion said that their preferred option for resolving the situation would be full U.S. statehood."
In other words those who cast a blank ballot expressed no opinion on the matter ...
Jorge

Toa Alta, Puerto Rico

#7 Mar 20, 2013
Brainiac2 wrote:
Congress expected to ignore Puerto Rico's vote for statehood...
Brainiac2 wrote:
...
Congress Isn't Interested...
You have to choose between "expectation" and "isn't interested": you can't have it both ways.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#8 Mar 21, 2013
The vast majority of pampered brainwashed island
Puerto Ricans believe that the USA is always right.
They are unquestioning marrionettes that repeat ideologies fed them by the colonial system to keep them in their place.

Since: Oct 12

Marlboro, NJ

#9 Mar 21, 2013
Brainiac2 wrote:
The vast majority of pampered brainwashed island
Puerto Ricans believe that the USA is always right.
They are unquestioning marrionettes that repeat ideologies fed them by the colonial system to keep them in their place.
Then why not pack your bags and purchase a one way plane ticket to Puerto Rico and then educate the Puerto Ricans about the wonders of independence? Here's your chance to put your money where your mouth is!

mysterysilence

Since: Dec 12

Location hidden

#10 Mar 21, 2013
LongIslander1987 wrote:
<quoted text>
Then why not pack your bags and purchase a one way plane ticket to Puerto Rico and then educate the Puerto Ricans about the wonders of independence? Here's your chance to put your money where your mouth is!
LOL good one ;)
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#11 Mar 21, 2013
Brainiac2 wrote:
The vast majority of pampered brainwashed island
Puerto Ricans believe that the USA is always right.
They are unquestioning marrionettes that repeat ideologies fed them by the colonial system to keep them in their place.
Oh! you and your one "punch one liners"...

You'll have to do way better than this.
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#12 Mar 21, 2013
Brainiac2 wrote:
Congress expected to ignore Puerto Rico's vote for statehood - The ...
http://thehill.com/blogs/floor-action/house/2... ...
Nov 8, 2012 ... Puerto Rico's vote to seek statehood with the United States seems historic on its face,... as reason to start considering legislation for Puerto Rico's statehood..... Neiman Marcus settles charges of misleading 'fake-fur' labels ...
Do you know what are Congress expectations on statehood for us?

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#13 Mar 21, 2013
Purto Ricans who think that the USA is forced to grant statehood are living in a fool's paradise.
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#14 Mar 21, 2013
Brainiac2 wrote:
Purto Ricans who think that the USA is forced to grant statehood are living in a fool's paradise.
Thanks to God, we have you as our saviour!

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#15 Mar 22, 2013
There is absolutely nothing in the Constitution of the USA that obligates it to accept territory requests for statehood as binding.
Jorge

San Juan, Puerto Rico

#16 Mar 22, 2013
Brainiac2 wrote:
There is absolutely nothing in the Constitution of the USA that obligates it to accept territory requests for statehood as binding.
You don't sound too sure about this.

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