all chinese get out of the philippines

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Jolie

Quezon, Philippines

#2 Aug 26, 2010
Rise above! The Chinese have been spewing vicious racist comments since the incident happened. Lets not sink top thier level.
They think they are better - prove them wrong.

“Somebody is watching you!”

Since: Oct 09

Location hidden

#3 Aug 26, 2010
I am sure the hatred being promoted by a multi-named poster does not represent most. Just another poster wanting to get attention at the expense of innocent people who died.

The world watched as a major screw up was in progress. Many were shocked by how it was handled.

Chinese who vent their anger on Filipinos not involved are just as bad as Mendoza and the spectacle put on by the PNP.
Dina

Sydney, Australia

#5 Aug 26, 2010
PNay wrote:
CHINESE INTRODUCED CORRUPTIONS IN OUR COUNTRY. IT'S TIME FOR THEM TO RETURN TO THEIR MOTHERLAND. THEY DON'T ACT OR SPEAK LIKE FILIPINOS. THEIR LOYALTY IS CHINESE. please leave chinese.
it might be an emotional issue for some but people should think first before they write something nasty

here's the proof http://www.pinoymoneytalk.com/2009-list-riche...

http://www.pinoymoneytalk.com/richest-filipin...

if they will leave the Philippines millions will be starving, unemployed and much worst the ailing Philippine economy will plummet to bankruptcy

seriously it's debatable to fine out full blooded Filipinos in the rich list
Tigulang Na Ni

Al Khobar, Saudi Arabia

#6 Aug 26, 2010
Removing all Chinese from the Philippines would be rediculous. It will never happen.

Chinese has been a part of Philippine history although nothing has been written much about it. They're already with the Filipinos long before the Spanish and the Americans arrived in the Philippines.

Some of them even know how to sing and memorized the Philippine anthem, more than the 100% pure blooded Filipinos. Shameful but it's true!
PNay

Binangonan, Philippines

#7 Aug 26, 2010
the chikwas also murdered FLOR CONTEMPLACION IN Singapore but Filipinos did not react. how many filipinos r beaten and hanged in INTSIK CHINA but we never complained. the chinky-eyed corrupt chinese r powerful in our country, many of them r TNTs and corrupt our government officials. they own manila bcoz they r protected by the chikwa mayor who is also mabahong behoooooo. deport all chinese. taenila they r corrupting filipinos.

“Jesus forgives..... ”

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#8 Aug 26, 2010
There are many philippinos in other countries. Should such countries chase them out or kill them?

“Jesus forgives..... ”

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#9 Aug 26, 2010
PNay wrote:
the chikwas also murdered FLOR CONTEMPLACION IN Singapore but Filipinos did not react. how many filipinos r beaten and hanged in INTSIK CHINA but we never complained. the chinky-eyed corrupt chinese r powerful in our country, many of them r TNTs and corrupt our government officials. they own manila bcoz they r protected by the chikwa mayor who is also mabahong behoooooo. deport all chinese. taenila they r corrupting filipinos.
Is it right to kill the tourists? Should other countries kill phillippino tourists too?
crystal

Burnaby, Canada

#10 Aug 26, 2010
D Truth wrote:
I am sure the hatred being promoted by a multi-named poster does not represent most. Just another poster wanting to get attention at the expense of innocent people who died.
The world watched as a major screw up was in progress. Many were shocked by how it was handled.
Chinese who vent their anger on Filipinos not involved are just as bad as Mendoza and the spectacle put on by the PNP.
- I think it's about time that all Chinese people in the Philippines must leave. I'm tired of this drama of Chinese people be kidnapped or hostage and then they're alive because they pay ransom. Chinese introduced Corruption in my country by bribing all politicians. I'm also tired of Chinese business people in my Country because they always hoards rice hoards oil, hoards sugar , they smuggled all kinds of products into my country, they copied our logo and stlye of our label products and mislead us., they uses dead people for their identity so nobody can trace them, if you can see around, why are all Chinese are getting rich in my country? because instead they are selling our own product Philippines they used our label product so Filipino would think that it's made in Philippines but actually are made in China. Chinese are crook. Chinese mislead the world. Chinese bribes because that's the only way they can do their business this way. Chinese are greedy, Chinese in general are not really honest. Chinese are dirty people.Chinese are human traffickers but they use Filipino Chinese to do this underground business. Chinese never pay taxes in my country because they bribe the government officials. Chinese bribe all police so that they can smuggled goods from China into Philippines. Our Police too has been trick by Chinese many times and I think we Filipinos must stand up and it's time to say goodbye to all Chinese in our country because they are the one's made us poor.

“Jesus forgives..... ”

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#11 Aug 26, 2010
Yes, they do anything just to get thing done behind the laws.

Since: Apr 09

San Juan, Philippines

#12 Aug 26, 2010
PNay wrote:
the chikwas also murdered FLOR CONTEMPLACION IN Singapore but Filipinos did not react. how many filipinos r beaten and hanged in INTSIK CHINA but we never complained. the chinky-eyed corrupt chinese r powerful in our country, many of them r TNTs and corrupt our government officials. they own manila bcoz they r protected by the chikwa mayor who is also mabahong behoooooo. deport all chinese. taenila they r corrupting filipinos.
Like a child blaming others. Philippines is fine with corruption all by themselves. Who instigated the ZTE scam with China? Filipino's. They scam so much then blame others because well they just cant help doing it because the other countries made them. Just like the child like antics of the PNP the other night but this time your caught, nobody to blame but yourself.

When is the Philippines going to grow up and act like adults and realize it doesnt matter what others do its what YOU DO!!!!!!
crystal

Burnaby, Canada

#13 Aug 27, 2010
Dina wrote:
<quoted text>
it might be an emotional issue for some but people should think first before they write something nasty
here's the proof http://www.pinoymoneytalk.com/2009-list-riche...
http://www.pinoymoneytalk.com/richest-filipin...
if they will leave the Philippines millions will be starving, unemployed and much worst the ailing Philippine economy will plummet to bankruptcy
seriously it's debatable to fine out full blooded Filipinos in the rich list
I don't think so. Chinese was the reasoned Why Filipinos are poor and starved!! I think it's time for them to leave in our country. All kinds of corruption in Philippines were introduced by Chinese NOT Filipinos.
Chineseman

Freetown, IN

#14 Aug 28, 2010
LOL, I am Chinese man in America and have much family in Philippines, we will not leave. Your country will become ours soon enough. We control the money that is what matters. Live with it.
morons united

Seattle, WA

#15 Aug 28, 2010
crystal wrote:
<quoted text> I don't think so. Chinese was the reasoned Why Filipinos are poor and starved!! I think it's time for them to leave in our country. All kinds of corruption in Philippines were introduced by Chinese NOT Filipinos.
Although the chinese are naturally not physically violent,I have seen how ruthless are the chinese people. When it comes to corruptions they could be ruthless, cold and calculating as well.
crystal

Burnaby, Canada

#16 Aug 28, 2010
Chineseman wrote:
LOL, I am Chinese man in America and have much family in Philippines, we will not leave. Your country will become ours soon enough. We control the money that is what matters. Live with it.
oh yeah!? we don't need your scam money . drug money, sex money, human trafficking money, bank scam money , business scam money blah blah blah and Thank You.

Since: Feb 10

Location hidden

#17 Aug 28, 2010
I have to disagree with most of what has been said. The Chinese are rich because they work. Whatever they own in the Philippines now, they worked for.
They survived because they knew how to care for each other.
For example, a Chinese community in one area will all chip in to prop a newcomer to the Philippines business-wise.
By contrast, we Filipinos have the habit of putting one another down.
Don't get me wrong, now.
I love the Philippines, and I love my countrymen, but let's take a good hard look at one another and admit our faults and failures.
I worked in a company here when I first got to the States, and had supervisors who were Pinoys, and othe Pinoys were in IT departments of that company and I wanted a foot in the door in IT so I can get off the phones.
I studied and earned a certification and asked for help from the pinoys but got snubbed, and sad to say, looked down. Never made it to IT. Never had that opportunity, and the hard thing is, here in the States, they do "typecasting". Like if your resume says your experience has been on the phones, it'll be hard for you to get an opportunity to switch. Possible, but hard.
By contrast, the other nationalities in that same company helped each other. A russian guy who could barely speak English got an opportunity as programmer, although how he will program when his grammar is that bad I don't know, but I don't take that against him.
I have no hatred for Chinese people, instead I admire them for their business acumen. They're smart.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Vancouver, Canada

#18 Aug 28, 2010
Chinese control The Philippines and SE Asia alot of other countries...

Philippines

The Chinese in the Philippines are mostly business owners and their life centers mostly in the family business. These mostly small or medium enterprises play a significant role in the Philippine economy. A handful of these entrepreneurs run large companies and are respected as some of the most prominent business tycoons in the Philippines. Chinese Filipinos attribute their success in business to frugality and hard work, Confucian values and their traditional Chinese customs and traditions. They are very business-minded and entrepreneurship is highly valued and encouraged among the young

Chinese Singaporeans are people of Chinese descent who are born in or immigrated to Singapore and have attained citizenship or permanent residence status. As of 2009, Chinese Singaporeans constitute 74.2% of Singapore's resident population, or approximately three out of four Singaporeans, making them the largest ethnic group in Singapore.

Singapore's standard of living has risen dramatically. Foreign direct investment and a state-led drive to industrialization based on plans drawn up by the Dutch economist Albert Winsemius have created a modern economy focused on industry, education and urban planning.[11] Singapore is the 5th wealthiest country in the world in terms of GDP (PPP) per capita.[12] As of January 2009, Singapore's official reserves stand at US$170.3 billion.

Thailand

about 14% of Thailand's population claim to be of Chinese ethnicity.[3] Extensive intermarriages with the Thais, especially in the past has resulted in many people who claim Chinese ethnicity with Thai ancestry, or mixed.[4] People of Chinese descent are concentrated in the coastal areas of Thailand, principally Bangkok.[5] They are well-represented in all levels of Thai society and play a leading role in business and politics.

Myanmar

The Burmese Chinese dominate the Burmese economy although many enterprises today are co-owned by the military. Moreover, the Burmese Chinese have a disproportionately large presence in Burmese higher education, and make up a high percentage of the educated class in Burma.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Vancouver, Canada

#19 Aug 28, 2010
Malaysia

The Malaysian Chinese have traditionally dominated the Malaysian economy, but with the implementation of affirmative action policies by the Malaysian government to protect the rights of ethnic Malays, their share has somewhat eroded. However, they still make up the majority of the middle- and upper-income classes. As of 2007, they constituted about a quarter of the Malaysian population.

Indonesia

They say the reluctance to describe themselves as Chinese is a legacy of years of discrimination.
Tens of thousands of ethnic Chinese died in the carnage that ripped through Indonesia in the wake of President Suharto's coming to power in 1965.
The army, backed by civilian militias, went on the rampage, supposedly hunting communists.
Many Chinese were killed, victims of a simplistic equation of their ethnicity with the politics of communist China.

Suharto imposed the so-called New Order regime.
For some prominent Chinese businessmen who were friends of Suharto, the New Order was a bonanza: they received huge government contracts and became some of the richest men in Asia.

Cambodia

Under the Khmer Rouge
The Khmer Rouge takeover was catastrophic for the Chinese community for several reasons. When the Khmer Rouge took over a town, they immediately disrupted the local market. According to Willmott, this disruption virtually eliminated retail trade "and the traders (almost all Chinese) became indistinguishable from the unpropertied urban classes."

The Chinese, in addition to having their livelihood eradicated on the whole, also suffered because of their class. They were mainly well-educated urban merchants, and thus were characteristic of the people whom the Khmer Rouge detested. Chinese refugees have reported that they shared the same brutal treatment as other urban Cambodians under the Khmer Rouge régime and that they were not discriminated against as an ethnic group until after the Vietnamese invasion.

Modern years
Of particular note is China's economic role in the country,[5] which encouraged Sino-Khmer businessmen to reestablish their past business which were once suppressed by the Khmer Rouge.

Modern Cambodian economy is highly dependent on Sino-Khmer companies who controlled a large stake in the country's economy,[6] and their support is enhanced by the large presence of lawmakers who are of at least part-Chinese ancestry themselves.[7]
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Vancouver, Canada

#20 Aug 28, 2010
Assessment for Chinese in Vietnam

Analytic Summary
The Chinese are reportedly dispersed across the country, although they are concentrated in the southern region of Vietnam, with many residing in and round Ho Chi Minh City They speak Mandarin and other Chinese dialects, but many are also likely to speak Vietnamese. Referred to as the Hoa in Vietnamese, the Chinese are Buddhists and they are physically distinguishable from the Vietnamese, who are referred to as the Kinh . There is limited information available about the cultural characteristics of the Chinese Vietnamese. However, they are likely to share similar cultural characteristics with the Kinh, because of the long period of Chinese Han dynasty domination of Vietnam.

Prior to the 1975 reunification of North and South Vietnam, most Chinese resided in the south, especially around Saigon (now Ho Chi Minh City). The southern Chinese were primarily engaged in commerce and they were economically advantaged, partially due to their favored status under French colonial rule.

The 1975 victory of the communist North Vietnam adversely affected the status of the Chinese. All private trade within the country was banned in 1978. Many Hoa businessmen were sent to populate and cultivate land in areas known as New Economic Zones (NEZ). During 1978, the Chinese held several protests in Ho Chi Minh City against the relocations to the NEZs and also to press for Chinese citizenship (PROT75X = 3). The 1979 China-Vietnam border war worsened relations between the Hoa and Kinh communities as some Chinese were viewed as supporting the PRC.

Some prosperous Chinese chose to leave Saigon prior to the fall of South Vietnam, but the major outflow occurred between 1979 and 1981. Many Hoa were among the thousands of Vietnamese boat people who were fleeing the economic and political reconstruction under the Orderly Departure Program. More than 200,000 Chinese left Vietnam for Hong Kong and other Southeast Asian countries during 1979. By 1981, some 227,000 Chinese refugees had been accepted by the PRC alone. Hundreds of thousands of other Hoa and Kinh boat people were to reside in refugee camps in Hong Kong and other South East states for up to two decades after fleeing Vietnam in the late 1970s.

The relationship between the Chinese and state authorities has vastly improved since the late 1970s. Since the early 1980s, political, economic, and cultural restrictions against the Chinese have slowly been lessened. In 1982, for instance, a law was passed which recognized the Hoa as Vietnamese citizens that possess the rights of all other citizens. Restrictions were still maintained on Chinese employment in the security sphere (e.g., armed forces). All employment restrictions were removed in 1986. The Chinese were able to expand their economic influence after Vietnam launched an economic liberalization program late in the decade. Reports indicate that the economically advantaged Chinese control up to 50% of local commercial activities in Ho Chi Minh City.

In the mid-1990s, all official policies that limited the participation of the Chinese in the political sphere were lifted. They possess the same rights as the country's other citizens. The improvement in the status of the Chinese has also been mirrored in the China-Vietnam relationship. Bilateral trade is an important source of revenue for Vietnam; in 1999, trade between the two countries was valued at $1.5 billion, up from $1 billion the previous year, The Hoa have also been critical in helping to draw in foreign investment from other Southeast Asian countries. There is no evidence of political or economic discrimination against the Chinese. The Chinese actively participate in the Communist Party, which in turn advocates for their interests
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Vancouver, Canada

#21 Aug 28, 2010
Laos

So it was that Vientiane, the capital city of Laos, has seen something of an absence at its heart with the lack of a Chinatown. Of course, support for the Pathet Lao from the Soviet Union was also a contributory factor but the situation is now changing rapidly. Not only are a small number of Chinese pioneers starting to establish businesses in the city, often in tourism or service industries, but rather larger groups of Chinese are entering the country through being hired as construction workers. The Asian Development Bank is leading attempts to integrate Laos more closely into the rapid economic development being enjoyed in many other parts of Southeast Asia through, among other means, an extensive road-building program. This will link Kunming in Yunnan province in the north to, ultimately, Singapore in the south and central Vietnam in the east with, perhaps one day, India in the west. Thousands of Chinese labourers have entered Laos to help build these roads and, once their contracts have expired, many prefer to stay on to build businesses in areas where they have spotted opportunities. Tens of thousands of Chinese are now believed to be in the sparsely-populated north of Laos – accurate numbers are not known – and the Lao government, acutely conscious of the difficulties its low population and low population density have caused, are expressing fears that a parallel state is being established in the northern border region. That is what already appears to have happened in Burma.

North Korea

Chinese Merchants in North Korea – Cure or Poison to Kim Jong Il?

90% daily goods made in China, 50% circulated by Chinese merchants
By Kim Min Se, Reporter from Shinuijoo & Kwon Jeong Hyun, China
[2007-03-07 23:57 ]

While some prospect that North Korea may be an affiliated market of China’s 4 provinces in the Northeast, the real focus is on the merchants who actually control North Korea's markets. Recently, North Korean citizens have been asserting that markets would immobilize if Chinese merchants were to disappear.

Lately, Chinese merchants are nestling themselves with their newly found fortune in North Korea, undeniably to the envy of North Korean citizens.

In a recent telephone conversation with the DailyNK, Kim Chang Yeol (pseudonym) a resident of Shinuiju said “Most of the tiled houses in Shinuiju are owned by Chinese merchants in Shinuiju are upper class and the rich.” Unlike Pyongyang, tiled houses in Shinuiju are greater in value than apartments. In particular, the homes owned by Chinese merchants are luxurious and impressing.

Kim said “At the moment, 90% of daily goods that are traded at Shinuiju markets are made in China.” What Kim means by 90% of goods is basically

everything excluding agricultural produce and medicinal herbs. Apparently, about half of the (90% of) supplies are circulated by Chinese merchants.

Kim affirmed that the market system could be shaken if supplies were not provided by the Chinese merchants. Hence, Chinese merchants have elevated themselves in North Korea’s integrated market system, to the extent that the market could break down without their existence.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Vancouver, Canada

#22 Aug 28, 2010
Taiwan

Taiwan's population was estimated in 2005 at 22.9 million, most of whom are on the island of Taiwan. About 98% of the population is of Han Chinese ethnicity. Of these, 86% are descendants of early Han Chinese immigrants known as the "home-province people" (Chinese: &#26412;&#30465;&# 20154;; pinyin: B&#283;nsh&#283;ng rén; literally "home-province person").

Taiwan's quick industrialization and rapid growth during the latter half of the twentieth century, has been called the "Taiwan Miracle" or "Taiwan Economic Miracle". As it has developed alongside Singapore, South Korea, and Hong Kong, Taiwan is one of the industrialized developed countries known as the "Four Asian Tigers".

In 1962, Taiwan had a per capita gross national product (GNP) of $170, placing the island's economy squarely between Zaire and Congo. By 2008 Taiwan's per capita GNP, adjusted for purchasing power parity (PPP), had soared to $33,000 (2008 est.) contributing to a Human Development Index equivalent to that of other developed countries

Hong Kong

(Chinese) is a special administrative region of the People's Republic of China. Situated on China's south coast and enclosed by the Pearl River Delta and South China Sea,[8] it is renowned for its expansive skyline and deep natural harbour. With land mass of 1,104 km2 (426 sq mi) and a population of seven million people, Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world.[9] The city's population is 95% ethnic Chinese and 5% from other groups.[10]

Hong Kong is one of the world's leading financial centres.[63] Its highly developed capitalist economy has been ranked the freest in the world by the Index of Economic Freedom for 15 consecutive years.[64][65][66] It is an important centre for international finance and trade, with one of the greatest concentration of corporate headquarters in the Asia-Pacific region, and is known as one of the Four Asian Tigers for its high growth rates and rapid development between the 1960s and 1990s. In addition, Hong Kong's gross domestic product, between 1961 and 1997, has grown 180 times larger than the former while per capita GDP rose by 87 times.

Macau

Macau's economy is based largely on tourism, much of it geared toward gambling. Other chief economic activities in Macau are export-geared textile and garment manufacturing, banking and other financial services.[7] The clothing industry has provided about three quarters of export earnings, and the gaming, tourism and hospitality industry is estimated to contribute more than 50% of Macau's GDP, and 70% of Macau government revenue.[34]

Macau is a founding member of the WTO and has maintained sound economic and trade relations with more than 120 countries and regions, with European Union and Portuguese-speaking countries in particular; Macau is also a member of the IMF.[51] The World Bank classifies Macau as a high income economy[52] and the GDP per capita of the region in 2006 was US$28,436. After the Handover in 1999, there has been a rapid rise in the number of mainland visitors due to China's easing of travel restrictions. Together with the liberalization of Macau's gaming industry in 2001 that induces significant investment inflows, the average growth rate of the economy between 2001 and 2006 was approximately 13.1% annually.[53]

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