Can Filipinos Become a Market-Dominant Minority?

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Since: Jan 12

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#1 Jan 16, 2012
As you know, The Philippines has a Market-Dominant Minority and that is the Chinese-Filipinos. They dominate the Philippine economy which is driven by many of the Small-To-Medium businesses and conglomerates such as SM Mega Mall, Sun Cellular, Jack n’ Jill and Bench.

Other examples of ethnic market-dominant minorities – referred to by other academics as middlemen minorities, include Chinese people in Southeast Asia; whites in Latin America; Jews in Russia; Croats in the former Yugoslavia; and Ibos, Kikuyus, Tutsis, Indians and Lebanese, among others, in Africa.

What are the hows and whys these Market-Dominant Minorities dominate these economies? What is their background and drive that pursued them to become what they are today from their often humble origins?

Can Filipinos of non-Chinese identity become one of these minorities in other countries? Would this be a good thing if they could?

Since: Jan 12

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#2 Jan 16, 2012
Many of the Chinese arrived in The Philippines during colonial times were destitute with no real financial backing. The Chinese who came could not go into farming because local peoples were already the farmers, and they were not allowed to own land; they were also for generations barred from becoming lawyers or professionals, so many of the Chinese started out as laborers, craftsmen, artisans and later became traders who pioneered the beginnings of Philippine capitalism.

Like the Jewish minorities of medieval-era Europe, who often acted as middlemen traders and moneylenders between the landed aristocracy and the general public, the Chinese minority in the colonial Philippine society often acted as apolitical middlemen traders and financiers, too.

So. From these very humble beginnings, what are the key factors that made this minority an influential collective group? Well a few things that are important to mention is the Chinese traditional Confucian values of hard work, self-discipline, delayed self-gratification for the sake of long-term future benefits, frugality, a high importance placed on education, filial piety of total obedience and reverence for ancestors and parents, are important factors in entrepreneurial success.

Since: Jan 12

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#3 Jan 16, 2012
Indians form the core of Kenya’s middle class (especially in Nairobi) and contribute significantly to the economy, but they are a market-dominant minority, possessing greater wealth than the indigenous majority population.

The Indian-Kenyans have been in the country for 3 or 4 generations. Most are Hindus and with some Muslims, often with their own businesses. South Asians were originally brought over to cut sugar cane or construct the railways. There are around 100,000 Indians in Kenya.

Indians have some similarities with the Chinese in terms of work ethic, in-group support, respect of elder's guidance, frugality etc.
AussiPino

Australia

#4 Jan 17, 2012
Indians in England have a profound influence in the Business Sector. Many of the top High School and University graduates are of Indian descent and many are in White-Collar Professional employment.

The large wave of Indian immigrants to England began during the late 1940s-early 1950s and many of them came with nothing but their families and their luggage. Once they arrived in England, many had to live in migrant hostels where they shared small rooms with 10 or 15 people. They had to start from scratch, earning minimal money from work such as fruit delivery/fruit vendors, car washing, janitor work, gardening and garbage collectors.

Slowly, after being frugal with their earnings, many entered the Small-Business sector. laundromats, Fruit & Veg stores, grocery stores, convenience stores, hair dressers and take-away shops. Children of these business owners usually help out with the shops and they were taught to work hard and appreciate every penny they earned. The parents disciplined them to study hard.

Since: Jan 12

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#5 Jan 17, 2012
This article is from The Telegraph.

Top 20 Richest Asians

The Asian influence on British business is staggering. From the entrepreneurial types such as the Jatania brothers, to Vodafone chief executive Arun Sarin at the helm of a FTSE 100 company, and now Asian companies stalking their European rivals, this vast continent is making its presence felt at every level of UK plc.

The figures alone tell quite a story. Asian-owned businesses in London have a turnover of about £60bn a year, while real Asian wealth increased by 69pc between 1998 and 2005, compared with UK GDP up just 23pc.

Today, in conjunction with Eastern Eye, Britain's biggest selling south-Asian newspaper, The Daily Telegraph publishes details of Britain's richest Asians.

The list includes people with companies based in the UK who do all, or a significant amount, of their business here. Wealthy Indians based in the UK but whose business interests are largely overseas are excluded - hence the absence of steel tycoon Lakshmi Mittal and the financial services business of the Hinduja brothers.

The list appears ahead of the glittering Eastern Eye Asian business awards, being held tonight at the London Hilton on Park Lane.

Spinder Dhaliwal, of the University of Surrey, who complied the list, says: "What I find exciting is the bravery of it all. You see these entrepreneurial heroes. They never stand still, they are all going forward. It's that pace, that inner confidence. We've been here three decades. There is no inherited wealth on the list. They have really used their business acumen and broken through a lot of barriers and prejudices."

The majority are true "rags to riches" stories. Mike Jatania and his three brothers, who run cosmetics giant Lornamead and top the list for the fifth year running, came to Britain from Uganda in 1969 when Asians were expelled from the country by Idi Amin.

Kamel Hothi, the Asian markets director for Lloyds TSB, says these difficult beginnings can spur individuals to great things. "Indians who were chucked out of Uganda or South Africa, when families suffer that loss, that mindset of having no option but to succeed - that really pushes and drives you."

The four brothers are now worth £850m, having built a business buying unwanted brands from the multinationals and relaunching them with a marketing push in new areas.

Vijay and Bhikhu Patel (3rd,£500m), who run the Waymade Healthcare company, tell a similar story. Born into poverty in the western highlands of Kenya, the brothers are now easily recognisable from their various appearances on television and their portraits hang in the National Portrait Gallery.

Vijay said: "I never want to go back to living in poverty. That has been the biggest stimulus for me to get on in life and succeed. I knew I couldn't get any lower than where I have been."

The pair opened their first pharmacy in 1975. They now supply and distribute branded and generic drugs internationally and have created a subsidiary to develop and launch new drugs.

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#6 Jan 17, 2012
Ms Hothi sees this as a natural progression for Asian businessmen and women. "When you have glass ceilings, the best thing is self-employment, so the best thing to do is to start your own corner shop," she said. "That is the path for entrepreneurship. Then pharmacy is the next best thing when children come back from university and want to use their degrees, and then franchises."

But in terms of sectors, hoteliers have overtaken pharmaceuticals to dominate the list. Jasminder Singh and his family (5th,£360m) have built one of the largest privately owned hotel chains in Britain, the Edwardian Radisson Group.

Firoz Kassam (9th,£240m) heads the Firoka Group of companies, which includes the Holiday Inn in King's Cross.

Traditional industries still have their place on the list. Lord Swraj Paul and family (2nd,£750m), and Nat Puri and his family (13th,£130m) both head traditional Asian conglomerates.

Lord Paul, who is also an active member of the House of Lords, chairs the Caparo Group, which spans steel, engineering, materials testing, hotels and the Caparo Innovation Centre. A combination of packaging, paper, engineering, textiles and plastics made Mr Puri into Nottingham's richest man.

Elsewhere, Asian businessmen and women are taking those traditional industries to a new level. The Asian interest in the textiles industry, for example, has evolved into fashion.

Tom Singh (6th,£350m) built the New Look fashion chain after borrowing £5,000 from his parents to open his first shop. Rival Shami Ahmed and his family (15th,£115m) have built the Joe Bloggs label into a global brand.

But the list is devoid of any active internet entrepreneurs. Dinesh Dhamija (14th,£120m), who headed internet travel agency ebookers for several years, sold it to Cedant in 2004 and is now focusing on his private equity firm, India Gate Partners, which raises money to invest in Indian companies.

Family is the overwhelming theme running through the list, with only three of the top 20 entrants appearing as individuals.

Consequently, the majority of businesses on the list are privately owned, but Ms Dhaliwal says this is now changing.

"The Asian community tend to be very territorial and they are quite protective of their companies. But the list shows they are getting external managers in, professional advisers and so on, all that is beginning to happen. And I think it will be more so when the next generation take over the business."

Of the entrants, Tom Singh has flirted with the Stock Exchange, floating New Look in 1997, only to buy it back with private equity funding in 2004.

But with the emerging interest in all things Indian, there is surely corporate activity on the horizon.

Kishore Lulla, chairman and chief executive of Eros International, the world's largest distributor of Bollywood films, says: "I think this is the best time for Asians in business now. India is the flavour. So take all the opportunities, go out and globalise your business and do whatever you can in your position. I believe that the next 10 years will be really exciting for Asians and their businesses."

Britain's Richest Asians

01 Mike Jatania and family
Worth £850m

Uganda-born Jatania and his three brothers, George, Vin and Danny, run the cosmetics giant Lornamead. The Lornamead Group is a privately owned international manufacturer and marketer of cosmetics brands.

It specialises in purchasing under-used brands and companies, re-energising management and reinvigorating the organisations.

Its portfolio includes big names such as Yardley, Lipsil, Body Mist, Sara Lee, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Henkel Schwarzkopf.

The company has its international headquarters in the UK but maintains offices in the Middle East, America and Germany, and distributes brands in more than 50 countries.

In February 2007, Lornamead established new offices in India, as it starts significantly to increase its business in this market, with a particular focus on Yardley and Finesse.

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#7 Jan 17, 2012
02 Lord Swraj Paul and family
Worth £750m

India-born Lord Paul, chairman of the Caparo Group, is a leading businessman and an active member of the House of Lords. He came to the UK in 1966 and founded Caparo, a private diversified, UK-based group specialising principally in the manufacture and supply of steel and engineering products for industry.

03 Vijay and Bhikhu Patel
Worth £500m

The Patel brothers arrived in the UK from Kenya when Vijay was just 16. They now head up Waymade Healthcare, a wholesale pharmaceuticals business. In an attempt to build the Asian Glaxo, the brothers have created a subsidiary, Amdipharm, which aims to develop and launch new drugs.

04 Gulu Lalvani and family
Worth £450m

Karachi-born Lalvani is the founder and chairman of Binatone, one of the world's largest manufacturers of digital cordless phones. Lalvani founded Binatone in Britain in 1958 with his brother Partap, naming it after their sister, Bina.

05 Jasminder Singh and family
Worth £360m

Tanzania-born luxury hotel boss Singh is chairman and chief executive of one of the most successful hotel chains in Britain, the Edwardian Radisson Group.

06 Tom Singh
Worth £350m

Singh founded New Look in 1969. It is now the third-largest womenswear retailer in Britain behind Marks & Spencer and Next, and the second-biggest women's footwear retailer.

07 Ramesh and Pratibha Sachdev
Worth £350m

Sachdev formed Life Style Care with his wife Pratibha in 1987. He sold it 11 years later, making £25m from the family's 85pc stake. Having recently sold his second company, in nursing homes, he is now planning a third.

08 Sir Anwar Pervez and family
Worth £250m

Sir Anwar began his career in the food business in 1963, when he opened a mini supermarket in Earls Court. He has since built an empire to become the "Cash and Carry" king with Bestway, a 50-warehouse operation in Britain, which employs around 4,500 people.

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#8 Jan 17, 2012
09 Firoz Kassam
Worth £240m

A hotels and leisure magnate, and the former owner of Oxford United FC, Kassam is famous for his eponymous stadium, a 12,500-seater on the edge of Oxford, which includes a hotel, cinema, bowling alley, gym, and restaurants.

10 Navin and Varsha Engineer
Worth £220m

Engineer and his wife Varsha already have succession planning in place for the family's pharmaceuticals business Chemidex, with both children studying medicine.

11 Bharat and Ketan Mehta
Worth £200m

The Kenya-born Mehta brothers are proof that a low profile is not the same as low achievement. Their fortune is built on their business, Necessity Supplies, which specialises in parallel importing.

12 Abdul Alimahomed and family
Worth £150m

Birmingham-based Alimahomed recently sold his packaging company Europackaging to MidOcean Partners in a deal thought to be worth £170m-£190m, netting the family a tidy £100m windfall.

13 Nat Puri and family
Worth £130m

Said to be Nottingham's richest man, Nathu Puri has built Melton Medes Group into a business empire in packaging, paper, engineering, textiles and plastics, in Germany, China, Poland and Hungary.

14 Dinesh Dhamija
Worth £120m

After a spell at IBM, Dhamija started in business with a small stall in west London selling cheap flights to budget travellers. He founded Dabin Travel in 1980 and Flightbookers in 1983. He has headed ebookers.com since June 1999.

15 Shami Ahmed and family
Worth £115m

Ahmed started out as a market trader in Burnley and went on to found the Joe Bloggs brand, which employs more than 2,000 people. Outside fashion he invests in properties across London and companies such as Austin Reed.

16 Rajan and Sanjay Kumar
Worth £100m

The Kumars' Manchester-based business has grown from an initial investment of just £33 to an international multi-million-pound fashion distribution empire, Rajan Fashions. The company supplies chains from Zara to JC Penney.

17 Harpal Matharu and family
Worth £100m

Harpal remains one of the top 20 hoteliers in the country with his Global Grange business. He incorporated the company in 1980 and it has been resilient despite fluctuating conditions over the years. Its latest London project is a 200-bed hotel converted from a Ministry of Defence building.

18 Surinder Arora and family
Worth £95m

One of the top hoteliers in the country, Surinder opened the Arora International at Heathrow in 1999, the first hotel in Britain purpose-built for airline crew. He and his family own hotels near Heathrow and Gatwick airports and their businesses have survived well despite difficult times in the travel and property industries.

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#11 Jan 18, 2012
That article is one of the many stories of certain minorities in countries that made it big from rags-to-riches. Perseverance and determination is one key. Helping and support one another is an important thing to note.

What are the strengths Filipinos can use to be as successful as those mentioned?

One thing is that Filipinos are family-oriented like the Chinese. Respecting elders and helping out with financial issues like the OFWs are doing at the moment.
Salawahan

Australia

#12 Jan 18, 2012
AussiPino wrote:
That article is one of the many stories of certain minorities in countries that made it big from rags-to-riches. Perseverance and determination is one key. Helping and support one another is an important thing to note.
What are the strengths Filipinos can use to be as successful as those mentioned?
One thing is that Filipinos are family-oriented like the Chinese. Respecting elders and helping out with financial issues like the OFWs are doing at the moment.
Filipinos make great prostitutes, pimps and thieves.
They have been making a success of it for a hundred years.
Everyone is happy with things the way they are now so why change?
None of the girls want to leave the bars. The politicians the police the customs etc, are happy with the scams and corruption. It's all good here.

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#13 Jan 18, 2012
Salawahan wrote:
<quoted text>
Filipinos make great prostitutes, pimps and thieves.
They have been making a success of it for a hundred years.
Everyone is happy with things the way they are now so why change?
None of the girls want to leave the bars. The politicians the police the customs etc, are happy with the scams and corruption. It's all good here.
Big money earners ain't it? Yeah all these have been prevailing for decades.

If The Philippines legalized the occupation of sex workers, then they can tax them and protect them from pimps. Cops will no longer have a total big influence on illegal brothels and bars. At least this will contribute to the economy.
Bwhahahahhahahah ahahha

Muntinlupa, Philippines

#14 Jan 18, 2012
AussiPino wrote:
That article is one of the many stories of certain minorities in countries that made it big from rags-to-riches. Perseverance and determination is one key. Helping and support one another is an important thing to note.
What are the strengths Filipinos can use to be as successful as those mentioned?
One thing is that Filipinos are family-oriented like the Chinese. Respecting elders and helping out with financial issues like the OFWs are doing at the moment.
If a child is raised being told he is worthless ,hopeless and will never amount to anything should it be a surpise when he does not gain success ??
People need to be encouraged ,praised and given assitance -not knock down ,humiliated, trashed and told they are worthless .
Shaelyn Schumacher

Australia

#15 Jan 18, 2012
AussiPino wrote:
<quoted text>
Big money earners ain't it? Yeah all these have been prevailing for decades.
If The Philippines legalized the occupation of sex workers, then they can tax them and protect them from pimps. Cops will no longer have a total big influence on illegal brothels and bars. At least this will contribute to the economy.
Most of the girls that work in the bars do deserve much better.
They are all supporting their families and children, many of them don't want to be there, They have no choice.
I don't quite understand the obligation they feel to their lazy parents back in the province that send them to work.
Kiwi Thumper

Lochinvar, Australia

#16 Jan 18, 2012
Bwhahahahhahahahahahha wrote:
<quoted text>
If a child is raised being told he is worthless ,hopeless and will never amount to anything should it be a surpise when he does not gain success ??
People need to be encouraged ,praised and given assitance -not knock down ,humiliated, trashed and told they are worthless .
your fcukin good at doing this hay chicken shit more shit paper i just love flushing your fcukin rants you worth less peice of shit

you love humiliating certain people in this forum hu with your racist and gay fcukin comments and what you try this on some one who does not know you were you all nice please cut the fcukin crap

you wonder why you are being ignored chicken shit how many talked to you since yesterday fcuk face i am sure with that high IQ of your you can fcukin work it out just like you could not under stand why were you live you had gotten no rain duh any one can work this out but you just love letting that fcukin ego of yours looose in this fcukin forum

ha you want aussipino to join your bandwagon in bashing the americans hay chicken shit

more shit paper love flushing your fcukin rants
Bwhahahahhahahah ahahha

Las Piñas, Philippines

#17 Jan 18, 2012
Kiwi Thumper wrote:
<quoted text>
your fcukin good at doing this hay chicken shit more shit paper i just love flushing your fcukin rants you worth less peice of shit
you love humiliating certain people in this forum hu with your racist and gay fcukin comments and what you try this on some one who does not know you were you all nice please cut the fcukin crap
you wonder why you are being ignored chicken shit how many talked to you since yesterday fcuk face i am sure with that high IQ of your you can fcukin work it out just like you could not under stand why were you live you had gotten no rain duh any one can work this out but you just love letting that fcukin ego of yours looose in this fcukin forum
ha you want aussipino to join your bandwagon in bashing the americans hay chicken shit
more shit paper love flushing your fcukin rants
you are humiliating yourself thumper -AGAIN lol
65 TRILLION IN DEBT

Miami, FL

#18 Jan 18, 2012
Culture Culture Culture...
here in Canada, you compare a Filipino Canadian born here outside the Philippines or a OFW even... they are nothing like the majority of the Filipinos you will find in the Philippines...

In Canada, Filipinos tend to be well educated...

but have lower incomes than the national average... probably due to being a visible minority

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89-621-x/89-621-...

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#19 Jan 18, 2012
65 TRILLION IN DEBT wrote:
Culture Culture Culture...
here in Canada, you compare a Filipino Canadian born here outside the Philippines or a OFW even... they are nothing like the majority of the Filipinos you will find in the Philippines...
In Canada, Filipinos tend to be well educated...
but have lower incomes than the national average... probably due to being a visible minority
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89-621-x/89-621-...
Yes. The negative elements of the Filipino culture can be a hindrance. Filipinos tend to not value frugality and the word 'kuripot'(stingy) is used alot. Filipinos tend to have the mentality that people cannot bring money to 'heaven' and why not spend it while you can because life is short. Possibly this is influenced by the Catholic laid-back attitude that prevails in the country.

Filipinos in Canada, America and Australia tend to be very hard workers compared to their counterparts back in The Philippines. Also to note that Filipinos with Chinese blood in them tend to be more frugal, industrious and entrepreneurial with high savings rates. The more the Filipino has Chinese blood in him/her, the more likely to be opulent. The more Austronesian-blooded Filipinos tend to be indolent unfortunately. You can tell by the way they do things like the habit of spending on things they don't really need, walk slowly, having too many fiestas and parties (which cost money) having the manana attitude and having low savings rates.

Of course these are generalizations but just looking at these gives you an idea why Chinese-Filipinos tend to be more affluent than Austronesian Filipinos.

Since: Jun 11

Bedford, UK

#20 Jan 18, 2012
Bwhahahahhahahahahahha wrote:
<quoted text>
If a child is raised being told he is worthless ,hopeless and will never amount to anything should it be a surpise when he does not gain success ??
People need to be encouraged ,praised and given assitance -not knock down ,humiliated, trashed and told they are worthless .
Sorry to hear your parents were so hard on you Ken. Still you are a perfect example of what happens when a child is humiliated.

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#21 Jan 19, 2012
Filipinos are known as a good source of employment in different countries around the world. Not only maids, musicians, nurses and seaman, but also a growing numbers are doctors, teachers and businessmen.

In Nigeria, Filipino teachers are in demand in their education sector. In America and Australia, Filipinos are in the hospitality industry, the trades, white-collar positions and small businesses. In Malaysia, Filipino cuisine is growing in demand as Pinoys have been working in the restaurant business there.

Today at least 20% of seafarers in the world maritime industry are Filipinos. In some ports of Brazil there are merchants who can speak Tagalog. In Turkey, Filipinos can find Turkish guides who know some Tagalog words like 'kamusta' and 'kabayan'.

Slowly, Filipinos are growing their cultural and economical influence around different countries.
Rahull the Bull

United States

#22 Jan 19, 2012
AussiPino wrote:
09 Firoz Kassam
Worth £240m
A hotels and leisure magnate, and the former owner of Oxford United FC, Kassam is famous for his eponymous stadium, a 12,500-seater on the edge of Oxford, which includes a hotel, cinema, bowling alley, gym, and restaurants.
10 Navin and Varsha Engineer
Worth £220m
Engineer and his wife Varsha already have succession planning in place for the family's pharmaceuticals business Chemidex, with both children studying medicine.
11 Bharat and Ketan Mehta
Worth £200m
The Kenya-born Mehta brothers are proof that a low profile is not the same as low achievement. Their fortune is built on their business, Necessity Supplies, which specialises in parallel importing.
12 Abdul Alimahomed and family
Worth £150m
Birmingham-based Alimahomed recently sold his packaging company Europackaging to MidOcean Partners in a deal thought to be worth £170m-£190m, netting the family a tidy £100m windfall.
13 Nat Puri and family
Worth £130m
Said to be Nottingham's richest man, Nathu Puri has built Melton Medes Group into a business empire in packaging, paper, engineering, textiles and plastics, in Germany, China, Poland and Hungary.
14 Dinesh Dhamija
Worth £120m
After a spell at IBM, Dhamija started in business with a small stall in west London selling cheap flights to budget travellers. He founded Dabin Travel in 1980 and Flightbookers in 1983. He has headed ebookers.com since June 1999.
15 Shami Ahmed and family
Worth £115m
Ahmed started out as a market trader in Burnley and went on to found the Joe Bloggs brand, which employs more than 2,000 people. Outside fashion he invests in properties across London and companies such as Austin Reed.
16 Rajan and Sanjay Kumar
Worth £100m
The Kumars' Manchester-based business has grown from an initial investment of just £33 to an international multi-million-pound fashion distribution empire, Rajan Fashions. The company supplies chains from Zara to JC Penney.
17 Harpal Matharu and family
Worth £100m
Harpal remains one of the top 20 hoteliers in the country with his Global Grange business. He incorporated the company in 1980 and it has been resilient despite fluctuating conditions over the years. Its latest London project is a 200-bed hotel converted from a Ministry of Defence building.
18 Surinder Arora and family
Worth £95m
One of the top hoteliers in the country, Surinder opened the Arora International at Heathrow in 1999, the first hotel in Britain purpose-built for airline crew. He and his family own hotels near Heathrow and Gatwick airports and their businesses have survived well despite difficult times in the travel and property industries.
Just goes to show that Bombayz like me are very rich and good lookingh. Utanka 5/6? Damiko pera. Namaste! India rulz! Bombayz like me are rich and good lookingh!

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