If I were a Malaysian - by an Indonesian

May 25, 2012 Full story: www.thejakartapost.com 12

My name is Mario Rustan and I'm doing an experiment. I'm imagining how things would have turned out had I been born a Malaysian of comparable class and background.

Full Story
giant

Anonymous Proxy

#3 May 25, 2012
"Would I have ever heard about the buzz in Indonesia over Malaysia’s “stealing” of Indonesian culture? No. It was not big news in Malaysia. Not because it was censored, but because Malaysians thought it was too silly to be taken seriously."

Your're spot on!
juragan sapi

Indonesia

#4 May 25, 2012
Menarik untuk membaca komen2 dari orang malysia sendiri, contohnya ini:
Natz / Thu, 16/09/2010 - 18:09pm

So does being a graduate from La Trobe University, Australia gives you the privilege and higher knowledge of how it is if you were a Malaysian? Interesting, but after going through your article which is much more imaginary and general than reality, I'd say that you still do not have the slightest idea how really is to be a Malaysian.

Read more, stay here in Malaysia longer, befriend more Malaysians not those studying in Australia but those who are domiciled in Malaysia. After all this, I believe your article would not have been written the way it is.

And yes @Global Malaysian, the writer sounds like a Malaysian studying overseas who has no inkling about the reality of what's happening in Malaysia but to rely only on words of mouth, media and online sources.

Anyhow, it was a good effort! I commend you for that ;-)
:D
juragan sapi

Indonesia

#5 May 25, 2012
dan ini ada komen dari orang luar negara malaysia dan indonesia:
Pete / Thu, 16/09/2010 - 19:09pm

Well written. I have visited both Malaysia and Indonesia and the difference in standards of living is immediately obvious. The other notable difference is that in Malaysia there is little and guarded discussion of politics with an outsider, or as general conversation. In Indonesia and my home country politics is fair game and we see it as our fundamental right to question our governments and their actions. We see it as a transparent and healthy democracy. Malaysia, like Australia is blessed with vast and valuable natural resources and a small population, Indonesia isn't, hence the disparities in living standards and personal income. I find it even more remarkable that in Indonesia there is a vibrant political culture and discourse with so many diverse peoples.
giant

Anonymous Proxy

#6 May 25, 2012
semua orang mahu demokrasi...tetapi rakyat malaysia mahu mengubah secara tersusun melalui peti undi tanpa revolusi seperti di indonesia. akibatnya indon hanya boleh berbangga dgn kebebasan mereka, tetapi di segi lain jauh ketinggalan dari malaysia.
ella

Indonesia

#7 May 25, 2012
giant wrote:
semua orang mahu demokrasi...tetapi rakyat malaysia mahu mengubah secara tersusun melalui peti undi tanpa revolusi seperti di indonesia. akibatnya indon hanya boleh berbangga dgn kebebasan mereka, tetapi di segi lain jauh ketinggalan dari malaysia.
nah tulah, kemana peti undi ni pergi?

naper pulak yang menang setiap pru ianya selalu UMNO, ade ker peti undi ni memihak kepada UMNO?...

rakyat indonesia dah dapat kebebasan, sehingga depaorang boleh sahaja melampaui sume depelopment yang ade kat malaysia ni, sementara kite rakyat malaysia senantiase selalu ade bawah ketiak UMNO, sampai bila kite ni macam sebegini? ade hati nak jadi negara maju plak, jika wang pajak, wang minyak di rasuah pembesar UMNGOK ade ke harapan yang masih tersisa, jika takder sorang pun yang berani cabar UMNGOK?, ko ni buta hati kot, sebab tula ko tetap menjadi penyokong UMNGOK.
Haji Muhammad Abdullah

Jakarta, Indonesia

#8 May 25, 2012
Mario Rustan
Bandung Indonesia

Good job and well done

From Jakarta Indonesia
Jebon

Cheras, Malaysia

#9 May 25, 2012
indon hanya bisa bermimpi dan berimaginasi utk menjadi org Malaysia ;D
Jebon

Petaling Jaya, Malaysia

#10 May 25, 2012
giant wrote:
"Would I have ever heard about the buzz in Indonesia over Malaysia’s “stealing” of Indonesian culture? No. It was not big news in Malaysia. Not because it was censored, but because Malaysians thought it was too silly to be taken seriously."
Your're spot on!
True! Indon lagi pada teriak perang hanya sebab lagu rasa sayange sedangkan di Msia cuma menjadi bahan "CUIHHH" aja ..Ahhh Indon itu memang bangsa budak ;D

Since: Apr 12

Concord, CA

#11 May 25, 2012
Malaysia Notes wrote:
If I were a Malaysian
Mario Rustan, Bandung | Thu, 09/16/2010 9:53 AM
A-AA+
My name is Mario Rustan and I’m doing an experiment. I’m imagining how things would have turned out had I been born a Malaysian of comparable class and background.
There is a good reason I could have been born a Malaysian, had my father’s ancestors from southern China landed not on the coast of western Java, but on British-held Malaya or the Straits Settlements (Penang and Singapore).
The more tricky part is imagining my mother’s heritage. Had she been Malay and my father was still Catholic, then we would have had trouble. The Malaysian government and society do not accept a Malay woman practicing any faith other than Islam, nor marrying a non-Muslim man who retains his religion.
So, for this experiment, I have to imagine that my mother is a Chinese, or Indian, or a native (orang asli) from northern Borneo.
As, if she were Malay (migrants from Java and Sumatra are also classified as Malays), then the government and society (and probably her family) would cease to look upon her as a Malay.
As a Chinese-Malaysian, my family could have carried my father’s Chinese surname. We would not have had to change it to a more Southeast Asian-sounding name like in Indonesia, Thailand or Vietnam. I might have had a southern Chinese given name and a Western given name too.
I could have gone to a religious private school to begin my studies as a child. If I had gone to public school (less of a possibility in Indonesia), then I would have gone to the Chinese Public School, where I would have learned three languages — Malay, Mandarin and English. On Sundays, I would have gone to an unmarked church, unless it was an old church built by the Europeans.
My teenage life would have perhaps been better than that which I had in Indonesia, if we assume the family had comparable income, was living in comparable area, and had suffered no personal tragedy.
Malaysia has no major city other than Kuala Lumpur. Its only competitor is Penang, whose population is a quarter of KL’s population. Both cities are dandy options. Penang is a Chinese city heavily influenced by Western culture, while Kuala Lumpur is the rival of Bangkok to becoming the number two city in Southeast Asia.
“Had I been a Malaysian, I would not able to write too many political opinion articles. That’s one positive thing of being an Indonesian.”
My social circle would have celebrated Christmas and Lunar New Year. I could have enjoyed good public transportation as KL was building the monorail before the Commonwealth Games and Penang is famous for its tramline and reasonable bus service.
I would have spoken English, although in conversation Chinese and Malay would have influenced my grammar and choice of words.
When the Asian Crisis of 1997 struck, no doubt my family would have been affected. But there were no riots and security fears.
I would have heard the prime minister ranting about a Jewish conspiracy on television, but there were no stories about a Chinese conspiracy as told by several Indonesian generals and ministers.
My father would have watched in horror the coverage of May 1998, which would have brought back his memories of May 1969.
We would have worried about whether a similar thing would happen in Malaysia, but since the government was strong, the Indonesian anarchy would not spread.
One year later, Malaysia was going strong while Indonesian problems were endless. That’s what you get for so-called democracy, the elders would have told me.
We take another line in these parallel lives — had I gone to Australia to study. No doubt in university I would have socialized with Singaporeans and with Indonesians — predominantly Chinese.
Every time I came home to Malaysia for holidays, I would have felt something was wrong with society.
Haven't started to read your post yet... but your avatar makes me hungry again. I miss authentic satay...

Since: Apr 12

Concord, CA

#12 May 25, 2012
Malaysia Notes wrote:
If I were a Malaysian
...
very interesting, and pretty accurate "insight" as far as I can tell...

"As a Chinese-Malaysian, I could have spent my whole life without befriending a Malay."

that statement though is not necessarily true in some states or areas... or perhaps in older time? It appears that Malaysia has become more racially divided recently as people become more "religious"... it is very sad.
george whyte

Scranton, PA

#14 May 25, 2012
Rusty is a pedo who likes to fiddle kids.

Just thought you guys might want to know.
inong

United States

#15 May 25, 2012
malaysia is gay country

kah kah kah ketawa gaya malon

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