Language Policy in France

Language Policy in France

Posted in the Macedonia Forum

Since: May 07

Orestis Upper Macedonia

#1 Aug 3, 2007
http://www.answers.com/Language%20policy%20in...

France has one official language, the French language. The French government does not regulate the choice of language in publications by individuals or private organisations (save for certain commercial purposes). However, the French government promotes the use of French in the territory of the Republic, in the European Union and globally through institutions such as La Francophonie. The perceived threat from anglicisation has prompted efforts to safeguard the position of the French language in France.
Besides French, there exist many other regional languages of France, both in the metropolitan territory of continental Europe and in the French overseas territories. These languages have no official status. The 1999 report written for the French government by Bernard Cerquiglini identified 75 languages that would qualify for recognition under the government's proposed ratification of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages.

After the first few minutes in the radio in the 1940s, the French government allowed in 1964 for the first time one and a half minutes of Breton on regional television. But even in 1972, president Georges Pompidou declared that "there is no place for the regional languages and cultures in a France that intends to mark Europe deeply."
The debate about the Council of Europe’s Charter for Regional or Minority Languages
In 1999 the Socialist government of Lionel Jospin signed the Council of Europe’s European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages, but it was not ratified. The Constitutional Council of France declared that the implementation of the Charter would be unconstitutional since the Constitution states that the language of the Republic is French.
The European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages is a European convention (ETS 148) adopted in 1992 under the auspices of the Council of Europe to protect and promote historical regional and minority languages in Europe, ratified and implemented by 17 States, but not by France (as of 2004).
The charter contains 98 articles of which signatories must adopt a minimum of 35 (France signed 39).
The signing, and the failure to have it ratified, provoked a public debate in French society over the charter.
One argument against was the fear of the break-up of France "one and indivisible" leading to the threat of "babelism", "balkanization" and then ethnic separatism if the charter were to be implemented, and that therefore there should be only one language recognised in the French state: the French language. This was also linked to a wider debate about how power should be apportioned between the national and local governments.
Another was that in an era where a widely spoken language like French was threatened with becoming irrelevant in the global arena, especially in economic, technical and scientific contexts, officially supporting regional languages was a mere waste of government resources.
As an example of what proponents of ratification considered racist and scornful, here is a sample quote from an article in Charlie Hebdo, a well-known satirical journal:
The aborigines are going to be able to speak their patois, oh sorry, their language, without being laughed at. And even keep their accent, that is their beret and their clogs.
Likewise, President Jacques Chirac, putting an end to the debate, argued that it would threaten "the indivisibility of the Republic," "equality in front of the Law" and "the unity of the French people," since it may end by conferring "special rights to organised linguistic communities."

Since: May 07

Orestis Upper Macedonia

#2 Aug 3, 2007
France, Andorra and Turkey are the only European countries that have not yet signed the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities. This framework entered into force in 1998 and is now nearly compulsory to implement in order to be accepted in the European Union .

Excluding the languages spoken in the régions d'outre-mer and other overseas territories, and the languages of recent immigrants, the following languages are spoken by sizeable minorities in France:
• Romance languages: Catalan, Corsican, Franco-Provençal, Oïl languages (other than French), Occitan, Italian
• Germanic languages: Alsatian, Dutch (Flemish dialect) and Franconian German
• Celtic languages: Breton
• Isolate languages: Basque

http://www.answers.com/Language%20policy%20in...
http://www.google.gr/search...
BOREC

Canberra, Australia

#3 Aug 3, 2007
MACEDON wrote:
France, Andorra and Turkey are the only European countries that have not yet signed the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities. This framework entered into force in 1998 and is now nearly compulsory to implement in order to be accepted in the European Union .
Excluding the languages spoken in the régions d'outre-mer and other overseas territories, and the languages of recent immigrants, the following languages are spoken by sizeable minorities in France:
• Romance languages: Catalan, Corsican, Franco-Provençal, Oïl languages (other than French), Occitan, Italian
• Germanic languages: Alsatian, Dutch (Flemish dialect) and Franconian German
• Celtic languages: Breton
• Isolate languages: Basque
http://www.answers.com/Language%20policy%20in...
http://www.google.gr/search...
What about your SECT GREECE????

Since: May 07

Orestis Upper Macedonia

#4 Aug 3, 2007
BOREC wrote:
<quoted text>
WE ARE ALSO "FRENCH" :-

WHAT ABOUT "AUSTRALIA"??

//////////

In February 1995, 22 member States of the Council of Europe, signed the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities. The broad aims of the Convention are to ensure that the signatory states respect for the rights of national minorities, undertaking to combat discrimination, promote equality, preserve and develop the culture and identity of national minorities, guarantee certain freedoms in relation to access to the media, minority languages and education and encourage the participation of national minorities in public life.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Framework_Conven...

->Neither signed nor ratified

FRANCE
TURKEY

Andorra
Monaco

->Signed on 22 September 1997, not yet ratified.

GREECE

http://www.coe.int/t/e/human_rights/minoritie...

At the lower and critical levels

1.RUSSIA
2.UKRAINE
3.FRANCE
4.BELARUS
5.GREECE
6.TURKEY

The bottom four are France, Belarus, Greece and Turkey. Top of the table

1.BELGIUM
2.FINLAND
3.DENMARK
4.HUNGARY
5.SPAIN

The study follows one in 2001 where the legal status of minorities in 36 European states gave the following results: half of the states (18) had fulfilled their commitments to the extent of 50%-85%, fifteen states (42%) had implemented 30%-50% of the measures required, whereas only three states, Belarus, Greece and Turkey gave much lower figures.

http://www.eurolang.net/index.php...
BOREC

Canberra, Australia

#5 Aug 3, 2007
MACEDON wrote:
<quoted text>
WE ARE ALSO "FRENCH" :-
WHAT ABOUT "AUSTRALIA"??
//////////
In February 1995, 22 member States of the Council of Europe, signed the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities. The broad aims of the Convention are to ensure that the signatory states respect for the rights of national minorities, undertaking to combat discrimination, promote equality, preserve and develop the culture and identity of national minorities, guarantee certain freedoms in relation to access to the media, minority languages and education and encourage the participation of national minorities in public life.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Framework_Conven...
->Neither signed nor ratified
FRANCE
TURKEY
Andorra
Monaco
->Signed on 22 September 1997, not yet ratified.
GREECE
http://www.coe.int/t/e/human_rights/minoritie...
At the lower and critical levels
1.RUSSIA
2.UKRAINE
3.FRANCE
4.BELARUS
5.GREECE
6.TURKEY
The bottom four are France, Belarus, Greece and Turkey. Top of the table
1.BELGIUM
2.FINLAND
3.DENMARK
4.HUNGARY
5.SPAIN
The study follows one in 2001 where the legal status of minorities in 36 European states gave the following results: half of the states (18) had fulfilled their commitments to the extent of 50%-85%, fifteen states (42%) had implemented 30%-50% of the measures required, whereas only three states, Belarus, Greece and Turkey gave much lower figures.
http://www.eurolang.net/index.php...
Australians are "Brazilians" comparing with you been "French".

No, they are not in the same group I suppose - but I know that their policy very close to the American's 0 (zero) tolerance for any abuse on it and in faver to protect all the human rights.

BUR YET AGAIN is no were to be seen ethnic political parties or using the second largest minority ethnic language in a NATIONAL level - as they propose to Makedonija.

Since: May 07

Orestis Upper Macedonia

#6 Aug 3, 2007
BOREC wrote:
<quoted text>
Australians are "Brazilians" comparing with you been "French".
No, they are not in the same group I suppose - but I know that their policy very close to the American's 0 (zero) tolerance for any abuse on it and in faver to protect all the human rights.
BUR YET AGAIN is no were to be seen ethnic political parties or using the second largest minority ethnic language in a NATIONAL level - as they propose to Makedonija.
Thanks to isolation

They don't have neighbouring minorities :)

p.s.

The had White immigration Australia policy
till 1975

http://www.answers.com/White%20Australia%20po...

Now even the Ethiopians can go :)

“Macedonian Sun Of Kutlesh Symb”

Since: Jul 07

Solun Macedonia

#7 Aug 3, 2007
Alexander the Great was King of Macedonia, period! Nobody denies that.
Constantine and Paul Glyzbourg were kings of Greece. But their
nationality was not Greek. Too bad the Greeks never changed their last
name to Glyzburopulos. They did this to the Macedonian population in
Aegean Macedonia in 1926!
I call that pure Greek democracy, what a farce!
If Alexander the Great was a Hellen then why did he get a teacher to
learn the hellenic language? So that proves he was definitely not
Hellenic, otherwise he would not have had to learn this language. We the

Macedonians, in Aegean Macedonia, were not allowed to go to Macedonian
schools since the Greek occupation (1913) since they were shut down. But

we still speak Macedonian, because we were born Macedonian and spoke it
at home all of our lives. The Greek so called democracy suppressed the
Macedonian language in 1936! But they failed, because people will always

speak their own mother tongue no matter what they are forced to do. This

language will never be forgotten!

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