Should Turkey join the European Union?

Should Turkey join the European Union?

Created by ExposerOfTruthAndLies on Dec 23, 2013

192 votes

Click on an option to vote

Yes

No

Not sure/Don't care

First Prev
of 6
Next Last
ExposingGreekRat s

Istanbul, Turkey

#1 Dec 23, 2013
Recent polls show that Turks do not want to be part of EU anymore , since they are doing very well economically.

Question should be ;

Should lazy Greek thieves who bankrupted Europe be thrown out of Europe and sent back to Ethiopia to rejoin their subsaharan ancesters ?

I say that should help EU survive.

Judged:

41

41

40

Reply »
Report Abuse Judge it!
Baldur

Austria

#2 Dec 23, 2013
this question is für die Hund, ask skandinavians, netherlands, swiss, austrians and germans ...answer: 99% NO !!
the albtraum- nightmare of europe
2 times they wanted to overrun vienna (the capital of the holy Roman empire of german Nation, 2 times they failed in the middle age.
and now they fly with Lufthansa inside our beautiful german lands.

Judged:

30

28

22

Reply »
Report Abuse Judge it!
THY

Istanbul, Turkey

#3 Dec 24, 2013
Baldur wrote:
this question is für die Hund, ask skandinavians, netherlands, swiss, austrians and germans ...answer: 99% NO !!
the albtraum- nightmare of europe
2 times they wanted to overrun vienna (the capital of the holy Roman empire of german Nation, 2 times they failed in the middle age.
and now they fly with Lufthansa inside our beautiful german lands.
No greek dog,they fly with Turkish Airlines ;)



The whole world does
for its one of the best airlines in the wolrd.
much ahead of Lufthansa in world rankings .

THY 7.
Lufthansa 14.
http://www.worldairlineawards.com/Awards_2012...

Judged:

23

19

16

Reply »
Report Abuse Judge it!

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#4 Dec 25, 2013
THY wrote:
<quoted text>
No greek dog,they fly with Turkish Airlines ;)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =jhFqSlvbKAMXX
The whole world does
for its one of the best airlines in the wolrd.
much ahead of Lufthansa in world rankings .
THY 7.
Lufthansa 14.

http://www.worldairlineawards.com/Awards_2012...
Related thread:
http://www.topix.com/forum/world/germany/T7QC...
Do Germans respect their Turkish migrant workers and "citizens" - POLL!

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#5 Dec 25, 2013
Here is an article written (pathetically overzealously) by an IT Turk type of character about a possible Bulgarian referendum on whether Turkey should join the EU or not.

http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php...

Referendum on Turkey's EU Accession? How Useless Are the Bulgarian 'Nationalists,' Anyway?- See more at: http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php...

The extent of their delusions of grandeur are astounding!

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#6 Dec 25, 2013
Arguments AGAINST Turkey's EU Membership:
http://www.debatingeurope.eu/focus/infobox-ar...

1. GEOGRAPHY

Turkey is not a European country. Ninety-seven percent of its territory lies in Asia. The EU does not need shared borders with Syria, Iran and Iraq. Agreeing to one non-European member would open the door for candidates from Cape Verde to Kazakhstan. Turkey is too big for the EU to absorb. With a population predicted to reach 91 million by 2050, it will be the dominant member of the EU.

2. POLITICS

Turkey is not a mature European-style democracy. Its politics are a tussle between an overbearing military and Islamists of varying hues. Human rights are routinely abused. Dozens of journalists languish in jail. Amnesty International’s annual report is filled with accounts of torture, free speech violations, denial of minority rights, unfair trials, failure to protect women. Europe would import the intractable Kurdish issue. Public opinion in the EU is overwhelmingly opposed and the Turks are only lukewarm about joining.

3. ECONOMICS

Despite it recent growth, Turkey remains an underdeveloped economy. Its GDP per capita at $14,600 is less than half the EU average. The entry of a country that poor and that big would place unbearable strains on EU finances. Turkey’s wealth is unequally spread, meaning that an army of poor immigrants would head west, joining the estimated 9 million Turks already living in the EU.

4. HISTORY, CULTURE, RELIGION

Turkey’s historic and cultural roots lay in Central Asia and the Middle East. It missed the shared experiences that bind Europeans together, from the cultural legacy of Renaissance and Enlightenment, to the horrors of the Second World War II which galvanized the drive for united Europe. As an overwhelmingly Muslim nation, Turkey’s cultural traditions are fundamentally different from that of Christian Europe. Turkey’s historical interaction with Europe has always been as an outside invader. Cyprus is an insurmountable obstacle.

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#7 Dec 25, 2013
http://www.debatingeurope.eu/2012/04/11/shoul...

What do YOU think? Should Turkey join the European Union? Or could there be a ‘grey area’ of half-membership that satisfies all parties? Do you think Turkey will still want to join if it is left waiting for too long? Are you confident that the major sticking-points to Turkish EU membership can be resolved? Or do we need to consider an alternative? Let us know your thoughts and comments in the form below, and we’ll take them to policy-makers and experts for their reactions

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#8 Dec 25, 2013
Here is a great comment written by a Greek:

Christos Mouzeviris• April 11th, 2012• &#57384;

I will just point out a few things:

a) Whenever this debate comes along, it somehow always ends up a fight between Greece and Turkey.. Well I am sorry, but Greece and Cyprus are the least of Turkey’s problems in joining..If the big powers of EU/Europe (Britain, France, Germany) together with their satellites (Austria, Belgium, Holland etc) say a big YES to Turkey, there is little Greece can do to block Turkey’s entry for good.. We will be forced to compromise one way or another, both sides…

Turkey’s entry to the EU is beneficial for Greece, as it will lift a lot of weight of our shoulders, like in defense and dealing with illegal immigration, as Turkey’s borders will be the forefront from then on..

If the big powers want Turkey in the EU 100% then the only thing Greece can do is to act up a little bit like Slovenia in Croatia’s accession to gain some guarantees and secure some of its interests.. So the Turks should not turn their anger towards Greece, as we are not the biggest obstacle..The Germans, Austrians and French are at the moment, so try to focus in turning their minds around…And stop bashing Greece and Cyprus…

b) On the Cyprus issue, well Turkey is mainly on the wrong. Even if we accept that the invasion was justified and they were right to do so, the prolonged occupation is not.. They should have invaded to protect their fellow Turkish-Cypriots ( if that was the real reason) but then leave it to the UN to deal with all the violations that Greece or Cyprus may have done to trigger their actions.. And let them face punishment..

But their actions in the recent developments of the Greek-Cypriot and Israeli gas exploitation plans, unveil the true reason of the invasion. Geo-politics!! Of course we should not forget the role of Britain in all this mess, and their divide and rule politics that created this mess and the India-Pakistan and Palestine-Israel mess. And they hold a small part of the island still…….

In order to have any solution at all, the Turks must recognize Cyprus as a state and withdraw all troops from the island. Allow the two sides (Greek and Turkish Cypriots) to find a solution between them with the involvement of the UN.. I have a Greek Cypriot friend here in Dublin, who is a good friend of a Turkish Cypriot…If people were allowed to solve their differences on their own, without the meddling of power mongering elites, things would be much better…The Greek Cypriots though will never negotiate anything while the troops are still present on the island…

Once this is done, and some other reforms are implemented (like the freedom of press issue that some other mentioned above) I really do not see why Turkey should remain outside the EU..They are European people to me, ethnically, culturally and socially… They belong in Europe..

But if the big powers decide NOT to accept Turkey in the club they have created, then we must give them a clear answer and perhaps renegotiate their relations with us.. If the Norwegians and the Swiss are part of the EEA/EFTA, then perhaps Turkey should join these two and so the Turkish people can enjoy all the rights and have all the obligations that the Norwegians have… In that way Turkey remains outside the European Parliament, it is not having a voice in EU/Europe (happy Germans and French) but its citizens enjoy all the benefits of EU membership ( happy Turks), apart for voting for the EP (that is not very democratic, but if the Norwegians are happy with it, then oh well). Unless of course immigration from Turkey IS the biggest issue for Europe..

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#9 Dec 25, 2013
http://www.theweek.co.uk/news-opinion/24083/p...

THE ARGUMENTS AGAINST
In many countries, notably Austria, France and Germany, very few people want to allow Turkey to join the EU. Their views should be taken into account.

Culturally, Turkey is not European. It is an Islamic nation which does not fit into the EU 'Christian club'.

Granting Turkey EU membership would mean allowing a wave of Turkish immigrants into Europe.

Turkey, part of the G20, is a very big country. It would soon exercise too much power in the EU.

EU countries have to achieve a certain standard of democracy and human rights. Turkey, which treats both its Kurdish minority and its women appallingly, doesn’t reach this standard.

With a GNI per capita of just over $8,000, Turkey is not yet rich enough to join the EU. It will cost taxpayers in other countries too much to subsidize it.

Despite recent advances in its relationship with Greece, Turkey's territorial claim to northern Cyprus is not accepted by Greece and others in Europe.

Turkey refuses to recognise the Armenian Genocide of 1915. It would be hypocritical of EU countries, many of which have extremely strict laws against Holocaust denial, to allow them membership.·


Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#10 Dec 25, 2013
Obstacles to Turkey's membership:
http://www.aljazeera.com/news/europe/2013/10/...

Turkey began negotiations to join the EU in 2005, 18 years after applying. But a series of political obstacles, notably over Cyprus, resistance to Turkish membership in key members Germany and France, as well as Ankara's crackdown of protests have slowed progress to a snail's pace.

The Commission's criticism to Turkey included what it called "an uncompromising stance" against dissent and a failure to protect fundamental rights such as freedom of speech and assembly.

Turkey's tough stance on dissenting opinion became obvious earlier this year "when police used excessive force in response to a major wave of protests", the commission said.

The protests began in May and quickly turned into widespread demonstrations against the heavy-handed crackdown and against conservative Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's increasingly authoritarian ways after a decade in power.

The report also criticised Turkey's legal framework, the judiciary and frequent political intimidation that contribute to curbing freedom of expression.

But the commission also welcomed Turkey's progress on some judicial reforms and the efforts to seek a lasting peace agreement with Kurdish rebels and strengthen the group's minority rights.

Turkish Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arinc, responding to the report, warned that putting increased pressure on his country could undermine public support for EU membership.

He noted public backing had fallen from around 75 percent several years ago to "around 18 or 20 percent" now, blaming EU countries for the drop because they "put obstacle upon obstacle on Turkey ... and act irresponsibly".

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#11 Dec 25, 2013
Against Turkey joining the EUROPEAN Union (emphasis on EUROPE)

1. Who can join the EU? The Copenhagen criteria

The Copenhagen criteria have been laid down in 1993 in Copenhagen. They specify which country can be part of the European Union. The criteria can be split up into three categories:
– geographic criteria (the country must be part of Europe)
– political criteria (democracy; rule of law; human rights; respect for and protection of minorities)
– economic criteria (functioning market economy; cope with competition and market forces within European Union)

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#12 Dec 25, 2013
2. Turkey – a general overview
Turkey can be described as a bridge between the continents Europe and Asia. In Turkey there are living about 72 million people, most of them are Muslims. Some of the ethic minorities are official, like the Greeks, and some other minorities do not have minority status. Turkey`s economy has been transformed since the crisis in 2000 and 2001, but the GDP per capita is less than a third of the EU average. Disposability of health care has improved in recent years, but provision remains irregularly.

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#13 Dec 25, 2013
3. Turkey and the European Union – the past, the present and a future?

In 1959 Turkey applied for an associate membership of the EEC (former EU) for the first time. In 1987 it applied for a full EEC membership and in 1999 it became an official EU candidate. The accession negotiations have been officially opened in November 2005. Since then the European Commission has done a lot of criticism, regarding the process of the reforms which has slowed down or the law reform which still does not guarantee a freedom of expression. Two further big problems are corruption and the non respect of the human rights. A big conflict also exists with Cyprus, because Turkey still does not accept it as a sovereign state.

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#14 Dec 25, 2013
Turkey's EU entry talks

Turkey finally began talks on joining the European Union in October 2005, more than 40 years after it first began to woo the emerging bloc.
Now it seems that things are already going wrong.
What are the main problems? More generally, what are the main arguments for and against Turkish membership of the EU, and how does the accession process work?
Why is Turkey's EU membership bid in trouble?
There are two issues.
The European Commission says Turkey must open its ports and airports to traffic from EU member Cyprus. Turkey says it will not do this until the EU takes steps to end the Turkish Cypriot community's economic isolation.
The Commission also says that Turkey's efforts to bring its laws into line with European standards have slowed down. It is especially calling on Turkey to repeal a law which it says undermines freedom of speech.
Will Turkey ever, in fact, join the EU?
Until recently EU officials talked about possible Turkish membership in 10 to 15 years. Recently European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso used the phrase "15 to 20 years".
Some EU states are keen to ensure that Turkey does not feel that the door is being slammed in its face, and that membership remains a real possibility in future.
Other member states have always been rather cool about the idea of Turkish membership.
If Turkey does everything it is asked to, is membership a certainty?
No. The EU describes the negotiations as "an open-ended process, the outcome of which cannot be guaranteed beforehand".
Also, France and Austria have said they will hold referendums on whether to ratify Turkey's accession treaty, if the membership talks ever reach a successful conclusion.
What are the arguments against Turkish membership?
A range of arguments can be heard inside the EU. One is that Turkey is not culturally "European".
Another is that it will cause a wave of Turkish immigrants. A third is that widening the EU to include Turkey will prevent further deepening of political and economic union. A fourth is that Turkey is too big, and will therefore exercise too much power within the EU. A fifth is that it is too poor, and will cost the rest of the EU too much.

(The TEXT is embeded in a Word File, which you have to download from this website:http://www.google.com/ url?sa=t&rct=j&q=& esrc=s&frm=1&source=we b&cd=22&ved=0CC0QFjABO BQ&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.un i-graz.at%2F~pommer%2Fcemateri als%2FHandout%2520-%2520Turkey %2520and%2520the%2520EU.doc &ei=gte6UsCYFsWIogTDjoCYBw &usg=AFQjCNGTyUIDIQKzUl_W7 McuAoUnLakg7Q&bvm=bv.58187 178,d.cGU)

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#15 Dec 25, 2013
The TWO main issues highlighted (again)

Why is Turkey's EU membership bid in trouble?

There are two issues.

1. The European Commission says Turkey must open its ports and airports to traffic from EU member Cyprus. Turkey says it will not do this until the EU takes steps to end the Turkish Cypriot community's economic isolation.

2. The Commission also says that Turkey's efforts to bring its laws into line with European standards have slowed down. It is especially calling on Turkey to repeal a law which it says undermines freedom of speech.

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#16 Dec 25, 2013
Will Turkey ever, in fact, join the EU?

Until recently EU officials talked about possible Turkish membership in 10 to 15 years. Recently European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso used the phrase "15 to 20 years".

Some EU states are keen to ensure that Turkey does not feel that the door is being slammed in its face, and that membership remains a real possibility in future.

Other member states have always been rather cool about the idea of Turkish membership

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#17 Dec 25, 2013
If Turkey does everything it is asked to, is membership a certainty?

No. The EU describes the negotiations as "an open-ended process, the outcome of which cannot be guaranteed beforehand".
Also, France and Austria have said they will hold referendums on whether to ratify Turkey's accession treaty, if the membership talks ever reach a successful conclusion.

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#18 Dec 25, 2013
What are the arguments against Turkish membership?

A range of arguments can be heard inside the EU. One is that Turkey is not culturally "European".

Another is that it will cause a wave of Turkish immigrants. A third is that widening the EU to include Turkey will prevent further deepening of political and economic union. A fourth is that Turkey is too big, and will therefore exercise too much power within the EU. A fifth is that it is too poor, and will cost the rest of the EU too much.

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#19 Dec 25, 2013
Arguments FOR Turkey's EU membership according to the source.

What are the arguments in favour of Turkish membership?

One of the main arguments is that it will help forge a bond between the West and the Muslim world, and help Turkey spread stability in the volatile region beyond its eastern and southern borders.

Another is that Turkey's young and increasingly well-educated population can help the EU cope with the problems of an ageing population.

For Turkey, one of the attractions is a further step in its journey of modernisation, which the foundation of the Turkish Republic began. Membership of the EU's single market is a big incentive, as well as the freedom to travel or work in other countries, without applying for a visa.

For the Kurds, who make up 20% of the population, EU membership is a guarantee against discrimination.

Since: Nov 13

Location hidden

#20 Dec 25, 2013

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 6
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Germany Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News In Europe, Pence to reassure allies at start of... 10 hr Carl the floorwalker 2
Why Germany is a terrible country to live in (Aug '12) 17 hr Bert 1,017
News Tillerson Urges China to Confront North Korea Feb 18 c oak 1
Poll Are Greeks ugly? (Jan '10) Feb 16 Greeks 100
News Warnings of rising xenophobia on Holocaust reme... Feb 16 Romi 4
News Dutch far-rightist Wilders says others will soo... Feb 16 ring 6
News Polish PM to remain in hospital for next severa... Feb 15 Romi 1
More from around the web