Combating Corruption in Argentina

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Deanstreet

Stanley, Falkland Islands (Malvinas)

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Dec 4, 2011
 

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Combating Corruption in Argentina

Sara Hernandez

Corruption in Argentina spans throughout it’s political history, especially when referring to the past six presidents that have occupied office since the economic meltdown in 2001. Corruption has become a norm in Argentine culture. It can be seen in every facet of everyday life, whether it be a corrupt judiciary, police force, and vote-buying legislature, or the fact that 75% of Portenos (people who live in Buenos Aires) do not pay the correct bus toll, 70% have illegal cable television or that 90% pay their way out of traffic tickets. When Swiss authorities in 2001 froze $10 million in bank accounts linked to former president Carlos Menem over illegal arms deals, the biggest surprise to the Argentine people was that the sum was so small. How corruption is linked to Argentina’s economic instability is quite evident: during the 1990’s Menem’s government sold off shares in state companies and public service concessions to please foreign investors, but it soon became an open secret that many of those privatizations involved rigged bidding, kickbacks, and other irregularities. With Nestor Kirchner as a new president trying to shepherd Argentina out of its worst economic crisis ever, restoring confidence in a competent government was going to be very difficult, a confidence that was thoroughly eroded by a decade of government borrowing and privatizing that led to economic disaster. Nevertheless, Argentina’s economic recovery has been swifter than many expected. Since September 2003, the GDP has expanded at an annual rate of 11%. By most standards, Argentina’s economy is booming. Now is Kirshner’s opportunity to seize the moment and bring Argentina into a new political and economic era.

To be continued...

Kindest regards from the Falkland Islands
francisco

Argentina

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#2
Dec 4, 2011
 

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Es que en el "primer mundo" son taaaannnnn honestos....
Deanstreet

Stanley, Falkland Islands (Malvinas)

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#3
Dec 4, 2011
 
francisco wrote:
Es que en el "primer mundo" son taaaannnnn honestos....
you lot aren't, are you..?

honest, that is...

remember folks, fingers and thumb....

Kindest regards from the Falkland Islands
francisco

Argentina

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#4
Dec 4, 2011
 

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Recuerda, UK: colonización, genocidio, latrocinio, y no sigo porque la lsita jamas acabaria... .
Malvinense1

Thornhill, Canada

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Dec 4, 2011
 

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Deanstreet wrote:
Combating Corruption in Argentina
Sara Hernandez
Corruption in Argentina spans throughout it’s political history, especially when referring to the past six presidents that have occupied office since the economic meltdown in 2001. Corruption has become a norm in Argentine culture. It can be seen in every facet of everyday life, whether it be a corrupt judiciary, police force, and vote-buying legislature, or the fact that 75% of Portenos (people who live in Buenos Aires) do not pay the correct bus toll, 70% have illegal cable television or that 90% pay their way out of traffic tickets. When Swiss authorities in 2001 froze $10 million in bank accounts linked to former president Carlos Menem over illegal arms deals, the biggest surprise to the Argentine people was that the sum was so small. How corruption is linked to Argentina’s economic instability is quite evident: during the 1990’s Menem’s government sold off shares in state companies and public service concessions to please foreign investors, but it soon became an open secret that many of those privatizations involved rigged bidding, kickbacks, and other irregularities. With Nestor Kirchner as a new president trying to shepherd Argentina out of its worst economic crisis ever, restoring confidence in a competent government was going to be very difficult, a confidence that was thoroughly eroded by a decade of government borrowing and privatizing that led to economic disaster. Nevertheless, Argentina’s economic recovery has been swifter than many expected. Since September 2003, the GDP has expanded at an annual rate of 11%. By most standards, Argentina’s economy is booming. Now is Kirshner’s opportunity to seize the moment and bring Argentina into a new political and economic era.
To be continued...
Kindest regards from the Falkland Islands
For sure,uk is/was a criminal/pirate country...
Martin Belgrano

Buenos Aires, Argentina

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#6
Feb 8, 2012
 
Argentina is one of the most corrupt countries in the world, everything you do here requires a fee or "payoff" to someone or you can't get anything done. If you own a business you get regularly shaken down for bribes from so called "inspectors". This is a way of life for people in this country. This is such a wonderful country it's such a shame it's run by the most corrupt government on the face of the earth. The president Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner and her supposedly dead husband Nestor Kirchner, increased their personal wealth from less than 1 million dollars to 80 million dollars in just a few years. Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner also claims to be a lawyer, yet has never practiced law and nobody is allowed to see her degree. It's a total scam country. STAY AWAY.
francisco

Argentina

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#7
Feb 8, 2012
 
Entonces mejor andate rapido!.

Y por favor, no vuelvas....
Malvinense1

Thornhill, Canada

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#8
Feb 9, 2012
 

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Martin Belgrano wrote:
Argentina is one of the most corrupt countries in the world, everything you do here requires a fee or "payoff" to someone or you can't get anything done. If you own a business you get regularly shaken down for bribes from so called "inspectors". This is a way of life for people in this country. This is such a wonderful country it's such a shame it's run by the most corrupt government on the face of the earth. The president Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner and her supposedly dead husband Nestor Kirchner, increased their personal wealth from less than 1 million dollars to 80 million dollars in just a few years. Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner also claims to be a lawyer, yet has never practiced law and nobody is allowed to see her degree. It's a total scam country. STAY AWAY.
Fuiste a uk alguna vez??Imbecil!
Malvinense1

Thornhill, Canada

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#9
Feb 9, 2012
 

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Martin Belgrano wrote:
Argentina is one of the most corrupt countries in the world, everything you do here requires a fee or "payoff" to someone or you can't get anything done. If you own a business you get regularly shaken down for bribes from so called "inspectors". This is a way of life for people in this country. This is such a wonderful country it's such a shame it's run by the most corrupt government on the face of the earth. The president Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner and her supposedly dead husband Nestor Kirchner, increased their personal wealth from less than 1 million dollars to 80 million dollars in just a few years. Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner also claims to be a lawyer, yet has never practiced law and nobody is allowed to see her degree. It's a total scam country. STAY AWAY.
Do you know the conservative in uk how they banrupt the country? uk public debt:1 trillion.uk foreign debt:9 trillion.
Too bad that many brittons live in Argentina..
Argie

Salta, Argentina

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#10
Feb 9, 2012
 
Deanstreet wrote:
Combating Corruption in Argentina
Sara Hernandez
Corruption in Argentina spans throughout it’s political history, especially when referring to the past six presidents that have occupied office since the economic meltdown in 2001. Corruption has become a norm in Argentine culture. It can be seen in every facet of everyday life, whether it be a corrupt judiciary, police force, and vote-buying legislature, or the fact that 75% of Portenos (people who live in Buenos Aires) do not pay the correct bus toll, 70% have illegal cable television or that 90% pay their way out of traffic tickets. When Swiss authorities in 2001 froze $10 million in bank accounts linked to former president Carlos Menem over illegal arms deals, the biggest surprise to the Argentine people was that the sum was so small. How corruption is linked to Argentina’s economic instability is quite evident: during the 1990’s Menem’s government sold off shares in state companies and public service concessions to please foreign investors, but it soon became an open secret that many of those privatizations involved rigged bidding, kickbacks, and other irregularities. With Nestor Kirchner as a new president trying to shepherd Argentina out of its worst economic crisis ever, restoring confidence in a competent government was going to be very difficult, a confidence that was thoroughly eroded by a decade of government borrowing and privatizing that led to economic disaster. Nevertheless, Argentina’s economic recovery has been swifter than many expected. Since September 2003, the GDP has expanded at an annual rate of 11%. By most standards, Argentina’s economy is booming. Now is Kirshner’s opportunity to seize the moment and bring Argentina into a new political and economic era.
To be continued...
Kindest regards from the Falkland Islands
????

Que tiene que ver ese tema con Malvinas? Se te acabaron los argumentos?
Nada para demoler los argumentos argentinos, no?
Argie

Salta, Argentina

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#11
Feb 9, 2012
 
Martin Belgrano wrote:
Argentina is one of the most corrupt countries in the world, everything you do here requires a fee or "payoff" to someone or you can't get anything done. If you own a business you get regularly shaken down for bribes from so called "inspectors". This is a way of life for people in this country. This is such a wonderful country it's such a shame it's run by the most corrupt government on the face of the earth. The president Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner and her supposedly dead husband Nestor Kirchner, increased their personal wealth from less than 1 million dollars to 80 million dollars in just a few years. Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner also claims to be a lawyer, yet has never practiced law and nobody is allowed to see her degree. It's a total scam country. STAY AWAY.
Que argumento tan RIDICULO.
Diego

Santa Fe, Argentina

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#12
Feb 9, 2012
 
LOS KELPERS NO PUEDEN HABLAR PORQUE NOSOTROS HICIMOS UNA PELICULA SIN QUE ELLOS SE DIERAN CUENTA.....O EN LAS ISLAS NO HUBO CORRUPCION PARA QUE FILMEN ESA PELICULA?
"FUCKLAND" PELICULA ARGENTINA SE LAS RECOMIENDO
TRATA DE UN ARGENTINO QUE VISITA LAS ISLAS EN EL AÑO 2000, CON CAMARA OCULTA......ENTRE LAS ESCENAS MAS MOVIDAS.....ESTE SE COME UNA KELPER.....SIN PALABRAS.....LAS KELPERS NO SABIAN DE LA FILMACION DE ESTA PELICULA? JAJAJ
Don Ata

Buenos Aires, Argentina

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#13
Feb 9, 2012
 
Martin Belgrano wrote:
Argentina is one of the most corrupt countries in the world, everything you do here requires a fee or "payoff" to someone or you can't get anything done. If you own a business you get regularly shaken down for bribes from so called "inspectors". This is a way of life for people in this country. This is such a wonderful country it's such a shame it's run by the most corrupt government on the face of the earth. The president Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner and her supposedly dead husband Nestor Kirchner, increased their personal wealth from less than 1 million dollars to 80 million dollars in just a few years. Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner also claims to be a lawyer, yet has never practiced law and nobody is allowed to see her degree. It's a total scam country. STAY AWAY.
Make up your mind, traitor. Either Argentina is a total 'scam country' or is 'such a wonderful country'. Mixed emotions, huh?

Many business-owners actually evade taxes, perhaps you're one of those? The kind of people that sells something and don't print an invoice, then says "thank you" to the customer inviting him to leave?

These are the same people that constantly whine about corruption (no matter which goverment, could be conservative, moderate, liberal, lefty, etc) while they're actually doing exactly the same every single day.

These are the middle-to-high class people that wanted those goverments to be overthrown by the only possible saviour sent by their King Christ: a military junta of course!

They didn't whine about democracy being systematically destroyed. Hell no.

Please, pack your bags and get the hell out of Argentina if you don't like it.
Hugo

Argentina

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#14
Apr 13, 2012
 
En la región donde vivo se pueden encontrar pueblos que no tienen red de agua potable ni de gas,esto de un lado del límite interprovincial,y a pocos kilómetros encontramos pueblos que tienen esos servicios,esto del otro lado del límite.Un legislador provincial peronista ganó las últimas elecciones (hace 8 meses) por una leve ventaja sosteniendo que la llegada
de la red de gas era un hecho.Oportunamente (durante la campaña electoral)el gobierno provincial peronista había hecho algunos trabajos de limpieza,alambrado,demarcado,e tc en
terrenos donde supuestamente iba a instalarse infraestructura de la red de gas;pero la ilusión no duró mucho,hace 1 mes se anunció que no había fondos y que la obra quedaba suspendida.
Por otro lado,hay una ruta nacional que conecta estas 2 provincias,dicha ruta desde hace varios años y en la parte de la provincia menos afortunada,está en mal estado y sólo recibe reparaciones deficientes cuando el deterioro no da para más,mientras que del lado afortunado es mejor reparada. Es importante tener en cuenta que esta región es productora
de granos (soja,maíz,trigo,girasol,etc.) y de carne vacuna desde hace años,lo que aporta millones de dólares por año al estado nacional mayormente.
Deanstreet

Stanley, Falkland Islands (Malvinas)

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#15
Apr 14, 2012
 
Combating Corruption in Argentina

Sara Hernandez

Continued from above..

"As a public policy major I came to Buenos Aires with an intention to work within the political sector of Poder Ciudadano, a non-profit organization linked with Transparency International. This sector works on corruption reforms within the political system such as lobbying for a bill that mandates more access to public information,(ley de Acesso a la Informacion Nacional), reforming the infrastructure of political parties, reforming election laws, as well as creating a information database on all representatives in government. My basic duties were to collect information of all political representatives in government for the database, this information ranged from what kind of cars they owned, to their office phone numbers, prior employment and career, to how many kids they had in their family. The database was primarily to be used for organizational purposes but also to occasionally distribute to the public, encouraging them to become aware of those that represented them.
It was compiling this database that propelled me to change the direction of my research. While the need for political reform in Argentina is endless, my observations and study of the overall culture has brought me to believe that any viable public policy based solution to the present economic, political, and social crisis in Argentina rests solely on the country’s ability to restore popular faith in it’s democratic institutions. While anyone you talk to in Argentina will lament about the horrible corruption in government, many Argentines do not realize that corruption in government is a reflection of their own cultural norms. Political reform will hardly do much but put a dent in the overall problem if corruption in Argentina remains a part of everyday life. It is with this in mind, I
decided to work for the citizen outreach sector of Poder Ciudadano. I spent the remaining part of my two-month stay observing, researching and participating in Poder Ciudadano’s grassroots campaign to improve political responsiveness’ and rebuild public trust in the government."

To be continued...
francisco

Federal, Argentina

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#16
Apr 14, 2012
 

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Estoy de acuerdo. Hay que combatir la corrupcion en la Argentina.

Por eso yo te combato....
Joe

Auckland, New Zealand

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#17
Aug 3, 2012
 
Martin Belgrano wrote:
Argentina is one of the most corrupt countries in the world, everything you do here requires a fee or "payoff" to someone or you can't get anything done. If you own a business you get regularly shaken down for bribes from so called "inspectors". This is a way of life for people in this country. This is such a wonderful country it's such a shame it's run by the most corrupt government on the face of the earth. The president Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner and her supposedly dead husband Nestor Kirchner, increased their personal wealth from less than 1 million dollars to 80 million dollars in just a few years. Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner also claims to be a lawyer, yet has never practiced law and nobody is allowed to see her degree. It's a total scam country. STAY AWAY.
Falklanders' advice and help is available if needed.
BritBob

Guildford, UK

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#18
Aug 6, 2012
 

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Unfortunately Argentina is ranked down in 100th place in the World's Corruption Index, right there with Benin and Burkina Faso.

Who'd buy a second hand car from an Argentinian?
deanstreet

Stanley, Falkland Islands (Malvinas)

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#19
Aug 6, 2012
 
Combating Corruption in Argentina

Sara Hernandez

Continued from above..

Citizen outreach allowed me to get out and talk to many different types of people in the community. One of our major projects was going into the schools and talking to kids about the difference between corruption in the government and corruption in school, such as copying and cheating on homework and tests.(La Copia y la Coima) Poder Ciudadano stands by the belief that acceptance of a corrupt value system starts at an early age. The project is an attempt to instill a value system in children that would be carried into adulthood with the belief that acceptance of a corrupt value system discourages people to demand accountability and competency in their government.

Besides the language barrier, I found it very difficult to respond to the questions posed by many of the school children. Argentines of all ages are very aware of the deficiencies and flaws of their political system. Many children wanted to know why they got in trouble when they cheated but politicians didn’t.“Why is it wrong for me to cheat on an insignificant test, when a politician robs the country of millions and never gets prosecuted?” Good question.“Why is it wrong for me to pay someone else to do my homework when it’s normal for my father to pay off the police officer when he gets stopped for a traffic violation?” It was hard to come up with a good answer.

I encountered the same sort of attitude when interviewing adults for my research. When asked what sort of corruption they observe or participate in on a daily basis, no one was bashful about admitting to shorting the system. Whether it be not paying bus fares, illegal cable, paying off police officers, or charging a different price for an item depending on the customer, Argentines are used to corruption in everyday life.“Bueno, es Argentina,” most would say.

A talkative young rollerblader gave me his opinion one Sunday afternoon at the park in Palermo.“Corruption is so embedded in life here; I have to cheat you of something because I know you are most likely cheating me. Never believe what’s on the surface because there is always a hook here. If someone is selling me a cell phone for 10 pesos, I know that it’s that cheap because it’s probably is stolen and doesn’t work very well. So I’ll give you a 10-peso bill that I know is counterfeit, not because I’m a bad person but because I know your cheating me so I might is well cheat you. Bueno, es Argentina.” I have to admit, responses like these made me feel a little discouraged about my work. Yet at the same time, it was encouraging to know that I was conducting research and working in a country which is going through major reforms, both in government and culture.

Argentina is an interesting country, with it’s abundant resources it has so much potential to grow and become a force in the world market and global community. It’s strong economic recovery from 2001 indicates the possibility of a bright future with the modifcation of some inherent flaws embedded in the politcal sytstem and overall social environment. In an attempt to clean up corruption in this country, people are going to have to change the way they do politics, the way they do business, the way they run their lives. Not so much because of law or regulation but because of the recognized need to improve their standard of living. With the help of NGO’s like Poder Ciudadano, little by little, Argentina is changing. It is going to be very interesting to observe the results in decades to come.

http://clacs.aas.duke.edu/funding/undergrad/m...

Kindest regards from the Falkland Islands
Hugo

Buenos Aires, Argentina

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#20
Oct 8, 2012
 
La clase media-media en un Estado parasitario
por Carlos Escudé
Como típicos pequeño burgueses de cualquier parte del mundo, a fines de 2001 mi mujer
y yo (un matrimonio de profesionales sin hijos) debíamos aproximadamente 46.000
dólares: unos 38.000 al Banco de Boston, que era el saldo del crédito hipotecario con que
compramos nuestro departamento en el centro de Buenos Aires, y unos 8.000 al Banco de
Bilbao y Vizcaya (conocido localmente como Banco Francés). Como los demás
argentinos en nuestra situación, habíamos tenido ciertas inquietudes respecto de esta
deuda, ya que firmamos cláusulas draconianas con ambos bancos en las que se establecía
que independientemente de cualquier cambio en la política monetaria, nuestra obligación
era por esos montos, con los intereses correspondientes y en esa moneda. No obstante, no
nos comportábamos como buenos ciudadanos ahorrativos, y teniendo buenos ingresos,
nos limitamos a pagar nuestras cuotas sin adelantar la cancelación de obligaciones.
Cuando a fines de diciembre la Argentina sufrió su temida devaluación, temblamos como
tantos otros. Pero pronto respiramos aliviados, porque el nuevo gobierno adoptó una
política de “pesificación asimétrica”, que convertía todas las deudas con el sistema
bancario formal a la tasa de 1 a 1, a la vez que el dólar pasaba a valer 1,40 pesos en el
mercado oficial y 1,50 en el paralelo. Poco tiempo después debí abonar gastos que
sumaban 5000 dólares, realizados ese mes en Europa con una tarjeta de crédito. Fui al
BBVA con esa cifra, la cambié por 7500 pesos, cancelé mi deuda con 5000 pesos y me
guardé el vuelto, como correspondía legalmente. A la diferencia entre este pago y mis
consumos en divisa los tuvo que pagar Visa o el banco emisor (ignoro cual de los dos).
Como en Europa ellos debían pagar en monedas fuertes a los comercios donde yo había
comprado, mi ganancia equivalía a su pérdida. Al salir de la caja no sabía si sentir
vergüenza(...)
Pocos meses más tarde, el dólar había trepado a 3,60 en el mercado paralelo. Entonces,
con unos 12.800 dólares en efectivo que (como casi todos los demás pequeños burgueses
argentinos) guardábamos en una caja de seguridad, saldamos nuestras deudas, que gracias
2a la pesificación asimétrica se habían convertido en esa cifra (ya no debíamos 46.000
dólares sino 46.000 pesos). Rescatamos la escritura de nuestro inmueble con un suspiro
de alivio, mientras el Banco de Boston absorbía una pérdida de 27.500 dólares y el
BBVA perdía otros 5800. Los mayores perdedores, por supuesto, eran los ahorristas,
cuyos saldos en dólares también habían sido convertidos a pesos devaluados.
Pero nosotros no debíamos ni un céntimo, gracias a la crisis. E incluso celebramos no
haber sido ahorrativos, porque si hubiéramos saldado nuestras deudas antes de la debacle
nos habríamos privado de consumos suntuarios, perdiendo el beneficio de la bendita
devaluación asimétrica. Nuestro consumo era pura ganancia. Más aún: si en lugar de
dilapidar hubiéramos sido muy ascéticos, no sólo cancelando deudas sino quedando con
un superávit en los bancos de Argentina, estos depósitos habrían quedado capturados en
el famoso “corralito” que desde principios de diciembre de 2001 inmovilizó acreencias.
Posteriormente hubieran sido devaluados y nuestra penalización habría sido enorme.
Cuanto mayor el ahorro, mayor la pérdida. Cuanto mayor la deuda, mayor la ganancia.
La lección era clara: en un Estado parasitario no se debe ahorrar dentro del sistema
bancario local. Por el nivel de inseguridad jurídica, sólo se ameritan inversiones
financieras especulativas. Las violaciones del derecho de propiedad por parte de los
mismos custodios del contrato social (toda una definición de la corrupción pública) son
demasiado frecuentes.

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