created by: Akritas Nike | Jun 21, 2013

Cyprus

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Are Greeks more RESPECTED than Turks?

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Akritas Nike

London, UK

#1 Jun 21, 2013
ATHENS USA

In the late 18th century, a trading settlement on the banks of the Oconee River called Cedar Shoals stood where Athens is located today. On January 27, 1785, the Georgia General Assembly granted a charter by Abraham Baldwin for the University of Georgia as the first state-supported university. Sixteen years later, in 1801, a committee from the university's board of trustees selected a site for the university on a hill above Cedar Shoals in what was then Jackson County. On July 25, John Milledge, one of the trustees and later governor of Georgia, bought 633 acres (256 ha) from Daniel Easley and donated it to the university. Milledge named the surrounding area Athens after the city that was home to the academy of Plato and Aristotle in Greece.[6]

Downtown Athens, looking down College Avenue towards Broad Street
The first buildings on the University of Georgia campus were made from logs. The town grew as lots adjacent to the college were sold to raise money for the additional construction of the school. By the time the first class graduated from the University in 1804, Athens consisted of three homes, three stores and a few other buildings facing Front Street, now known as Broad Street. Completed in 1806 and named in honor of Benjamin Franklin, Franklin College was the University of Georgia's and the City of Athens' first permanent structure. This brick building is now called Old College.
Akritas Nike

London, UK

#2 Jun 21, 2013
PHILADELPHIA USA

In 1681, in partial repayment of a debt, Charles II of England granted William Penn a charter for what would become the Pennsylvania colony. Despite the royal charter, Penn bought the land from the local Lenape to be on good terms with the Native Americans and ensure peace for his colony.[10] According to legend Penn made a treaty of friendship with Lenape chief Tammany under an elm tree at Shackamaxon, in what is now the city's Fishtown section.[11] Penn named the city Philadelphia, which is Greek for brotherly love (from philos, "love" or "friendship", and adelphos, "brother"). As a Quaker, Penn had experienced religious persecution and wanted his colony to be a place where anyone could worship freely. This tolerance, far more than afforded by most other colonies, led to better relations with the local Native tribes and fostered Philadelphia's rapid growth into America's most important city.
Akritas Nike

London, UK

#3 Jun 21, 2013
Significant waves of Turkish immigration to the United States began during the period between 1820 and 1920.[10] About 300,000 people immigrated from the Ottoman Empire to the United States, although only 50,000 of these immigrants were Muslim Turks whilst the rest were mainly Arabs, Armenians, Greeks, Jews and other Muslim groups under the Ottoman rule.[11]

Most ethnic Turks feared that they would not be accepted in a Christian country because of their religion and often adopted and registered under a Christian name at the port of entry in order to gain easy access to the United States;[12][13] moreover, many declared themselves as "Syrians" or even "Armenians" in order to avoid discrimination.[14]
Akritas Nike

London, UK

#5 Jun 21, 2013
TELLY SAVALAS

Aristotelis "Telly" Savalas (Greek: Αρι στο τέλ ης "Τέ λλυ " Σαβ άλα ς; January 21, 1922 – January 22, 1994) was a Greek American film and television actor and singer, whose career spanned four decades. Best known for playing the title role in the 1970s crime drama Kojak, Savalas was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in Birdman of Alcatraz (1962).
His other movie credits include The Young Savages (1961), The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965), Battle of the Bulge (1965), The Dirty Dozen (1967), The Scalphunters (1968), supervillain Ernst Stavro Blofeld in the James Bond film On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969), Kelly's Heroes (1970), Pretty Maids All in a Row (1971), Inside Out (1975), and Escape to Athena (1979).

Early life[edit]

The second of five children, Savalas was born as Aristotelis Savalas[1] in Garden City, New York, in 1922, to Greek American parents Christina (née Kapsalis), a New York City artist who was a native of Sparta, and Nick Savalas, a Greek restaurant owner.[2] When he entered Sewanhaka High School in Floral Park, New York,[3] he initially spoke only Greek, but learned English and graduated in 1940. After graduation he worked as a lifeguard, but on one occasion was unsuccessful at rescuing a man from drowning, an event which would haunt Savalas for the remainder of his life.[4] When he entered Columbia University School of General Studies Savalas took courses including English language, radio, and psychology, graduating in 1948. At that time he fell in love with radio and television, which led to his interest in acting.
Akritas Nike

London, UK

#6 Jun 21, 2013
Greeks offered most aspects of civilization to the world.

They first of all offered Logic (see Aristotle and his monumental masterpieve "Το Όργ ανο ν") and Philosophy. Most modern philosophical currents are based either on Plato or Aristotle.
A non-complete list of things Greeks have offered to the world includes geometry (see Euclid), medicine (see Hippokratis), theatre (see Aesclylus), mathematics (see Thales), astronomy (see Aristarhos), language (all languages are based on Greek - see relative articles for Greek words existing by the thousands in all modern languages), music (see the Pythagorean system of numbers-in-music), democracy (see Pericles).
Akritas Nike

London, UK

#7 Jun 21, 2013
LIST OF POSITIVE TURKISH CONTRIBUTION TO THE WORLD

1. Errrrr Kebabs?
2. I give up
Akritas Nike

London, UK

#8 Jun 21, 2013
Eight weightlifters have been left off the Turkish national squad ahead of the Mediterranean Games, which started yesterday in Mersin, after testing positive for doping. The president of Turkey's Weightlifting Federation, Tamer Taşpınar, said today all eight athletes had been competing in the men's contest and they were facing suspensions between six months and two years.

Turkish weightlifting has been rocked by two major doping scandals in recent years, with dozens of athletes, including Olympic and world championship medalists and young talents competing in youth squads. The previous federation had resigned following a second scandal earlier this year, when five Turkish weightlifters tested positive for doping during the European Under-23 Championships in Israel.

"We gave a lot of advice. We visited them during their camps with our specialists. But unfortunately some habits are deplorable," Taşpınar said, adding that they had been expecting two or three gold medals from among the eight athletes who were suspended.
Akritas Nike

London, UK

#10 Jun 22, 2013
Olympus Mons was named after the home of the twelve gods of Olympus in Greek mythology. It was first observed by Italian astronomer Giovanni Schiaparelli in 1879 as a small, whitish patch, that he named Nix Olympica (the Snows of Olympus). This feature wasn't identified as a volcano until about a century later when the NASA space probe Mariner 9 photographed Mars for the first time from Mars orbit, at which point its name was changed to Olympus Mons.

Tharsis comes from the Bible and refers to a land at the western extremity of the known world.

Phobos is named after the son of Ares (Mars) from Greek Mythology.

Olympus Mons (Latin for Mount Olympus) is a large shield volcano on the planet Mars. By one measure, it has a height of nearly 22 km (14 mi).[3] This makes it the tallest mountain on any planet in the Solar System (and, after the 2011 discovery of Rheasilvia Mons on 4 Vesta, the second largest mountain on any world known). It stands almost three times as tall as Mount Everest's height above sea level. Olympus Mons is the youngest of the large volcanoes on Mars, having formed during Mars's Amazonian Period. Olympus Mons had been known to astronomers since the late 19th century as the albedo feature Nix Olympica (Latin for "Olympic Snow"). Its mountainous nature was suspected well before space probes confirmed its identity as a mountain.[4]
Akritas Constantinople

London, UK

#11 Jun 22, 2013
Constantinople was famed for architectural masterpieces such as the church of Hagia Sophia, the sacred palace of the emperors, the hippodrome, and the Golden Gate, lining the arcaded avenues and squares. Constantinople contained numerous artistic and literary treasures before it was sacked in 1453.[3] It was virtually depopulated when it fell to the Ottoman Turks.
Akritas Constantinople

London, UK

#12 Jun 22, 2013
Sailing to Byzantium
That is no country for old men. The young
In one another’s arms, birds in the trees
– Those dying generations – at their song,
The salmon‐falls, the mackerel‐crowded seas,
Fish, flesh, or fowl, commend all summer long
Whatever is begotten, born, and dies.
Caught in that sensual music all neglect
Monuments of unageing intellect.

An aged man is but a paltry thing,
A tattered coat upon a stick, unless
Soul clap its hands and sing, and louder sing
For every tatter in its mortal dress,
Nor is there singing school but studying
Monuments of its own magnificence;
And therefore I have sailed the seas and come
To the holy city of Byzantium.

O sages standing in God’s holy fire
As in the gold mosaic of a wall,
Come from the holy fire, perne in a gyre,
And be the singing‐masters of my soul.
Consume my heart away; sick with desire
And fastened to a dying animal
It knows not what it is; and gather me
Into the artifice of eternity.

Once out of nature I shall never take
My bodily form from any natural thing,
But such a form as Grecian goldsmiths make
Of hammered gold and gold enamelling
To keep a drowsy Emperor awake;
Or set upon a golden bough to sing
To lords and ladies of Byzantium
Of what is past, or passing, or to come.
Akritas Constantinople

London, UK

#13 Jun 22, 2013
MARSEILLE - FRANCE

Marseille has been called the oldest city in France, as it was founded in 600 BC by Greeks from Phocaea as a trading port under the name Μασ σαλ ία (Massalia; see also List of traditional Greek place names). The connection between Μασ σαλ ία and the Phoceans is mentioned in Book I, 13 of the History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides.[11] The precise circumstances and date of founding remain obscure, but nevertheless a legend survives. Protis, while exploring for a new trading outpost or emporion for Phocaea, discovered the Mediterranean cove of the Lacydon, fed by a freshwater stream and protected by two rocky promontories.[12] Protis was invited inland to a banquet held by the chief of the local Ligurian tribe for suitors seeking the hand of his daughter Gyptis in marriage. At the end of the banquet, Gyptis presented the ceremonial cup of wine to Protis, indicating her unequivocal choice. Following their marriage, they moved to the hill just to the north of the Lacydon; and from this settlement grew Massalia.[12]

View from the Vieux-Port towards Notre-Dame-de-la-Garde
Massalia was one of the first Greek ports in Western Europe,[13] growing to a population of over 1000. It was the first settlement given city status in France. Facing an opposing alliance of the Etruscans, Carthage and the Celts, the Greek colony allied itself with the expanding Roman Republic for protection. This protectionist association brought aid in the event of future attacks, and perhaps equally important, it also brought the people of Massalia into the complex Roman market.
Akritas Constantinople

London, UK

#14 Jun 22, 2013
PETE SAMPRAS - TENNIS

Early life and career[edit]
Pete Sampras was born in Potomac, Maryland, and is the third child of Sammy and Georgia Sampras. His mother immigrated from Sparta, Greece, and his father was born in the United States to a Greek father and a Jewish mother.[3][4] He attended regular services of the Greek Orthodox Church on Sundays.[5] From an early age, Sampras showed signs of outstanding athletic ability. At the age of 3, Sampras discovered a tennis racket in the basement of his home and spent hours hitting balls against the wall. In 1978, the Sampras family moved to Palos Verdes, California, and the warmer climate there allowed seven-year-old Pete to play more tennis. From early on, his great idol was Rod Laver, and at 11, Sampras met and played with him.[6] The Sampras family joined the Jack Kramer Club, and it was here that Sampras's talent became apparent. He was spotted by Peter Fischer, a pediatrician and tennis enthusiast, who coached Sampras until 1989.[6][7] Fischer was responsible for converting Sampras's double-handed backhand to single-handed with the goal of being better prepared to win Wimbledon.[
Rockstar

Brooklyn, NY

#16 Jun 22, 2013
Guy of Bellapais wrote:
Still talking about the past?, zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzz
Haha!
Rockstar

Brooklyn, NY

#17 Jun 22, 2013
Guy of Bellapais wrote:
Still talking about the past?, zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzz
How is the weather in Cyprus bro?
Rockstar

Brooklyn, NY

#19 Jun 22, 2013
Guy of Bellapais wrote:
<quoted text>hot n sticky, 42 and it's only June!!! Fck august!
I love it. Enjoy.
greek

Union, NJ

#21 Jun 22, 2013
Akritas Nike wrote:
LIST OF POSITIVE TURKISH CONTRIBUTION TO THE WORLD
1. Errrrr Kebabs?
2. I give up
3.Ambassador to Netherlands gave the Dutch the Tulip
4 NOTHING any turks out there come up with anything?
Dervis Eroglu

Turkey

#22 Jun 23, 2013
here is just a few out of many.

Lagari Hasan Celebi, 1633 Turkey first manned rocket flight

&#350;erafeddin Sabuncuo&#287;lu, 1385-1468, Turkey illustrated surgical atlas

Gazi Yasargil,1925 Turkey Micro neurosurgery

Turhan Alçelik 2006 Turkey non-glaring headlamp

Hakan Gürsu, 2007 Turkey Volitan
greek

Union, NJ

#23 Jun 23, 2013
Dervis Eroglu wrote:
here is just a few out of many.
Lagari Hasan Celebi, 1633 Turkey first manned rocket flight
&#350;erafeddin Sabuncuo&#287;lu, 1385-1468, Turkey illustrated surgical atlas
Gazi Yasargil,1925 Turkey Micro neurosurgery
Turhan Alçelik 2006 Turkey non-glaring headlamp
Hakan Gürsu, 2007 Turkey Volitan
Turkey HAD the first manned Rocket flights?
1635 no less? American and Soviet Space programs not listed? Dervis stop showing what an IDIOT you really are
Next you will telling us how Turkish Space Program will land an astronaut on the Sun AT NIGHT TIME
Akritas Constantinople

London, UK

#24 Jun 23, 2013
UNESCO EMBLEM

The Flag

The flag of UNESCO show its logo in white on UN blue, akin to most other organizations of the UNO system. The logo is a stylized Ancient Greek temple portico, with three stairs steps, seven columns and a pediment, the columns being the letters "UNESCO" in a condensed (sans serif) typeface set very loosely.
António Martins-Tuvalkin, 31 May 2008

www.crwflags.com/fotw/flags/unesco.html&#... ;
Akritas Ptolemy

London, UK

#25 Jun 23, 2013
ALEXANDRIA - EGYPT

Alexandria was founded around a small pharaonic town c. 331 BC by Alexander the Great. It became an important centre of the Hellenistic civilization and remained the capital of Hellenistic and Roman & Byzantine Egypt for almost one thousand years until the Muslim conquest of Egypt in AD 641, when a new capital was founded at Fustat (later absorbed into Cairo). Hellenistic Alexandria was best known for the Lighthouse of Alexandria (Pharos), one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World; its Great Library (the largest in the ancient world; now replaced by a modern one); and the Necropolis, one of the Seven Wonders of the Middle Ages. Ongoing maritime archaeology in the harbor of Alexandria, which began in 1994, is revealing details of Alexandria both before the arrival of Alexander, when a city named Rhacotis existed there, and during the Ptolemaic dynasty.

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