Malaysian Airlines Flight from Kuala ...

Malaysian Airlines Flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing Missing

There are 456 comments on the Voice of America story from Mar 8, 2014, titled Malaysian Airlines Flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing Missing. In it, Voice of America reports that:

A relative of a passenger onboard Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 cries, surrounded by journalists, at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, China.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Voice of America.

AAAA

Chester, UK

#127 Mar 15, 2014
Sugarbabies64 wrote:
<quoted text>
Ill answer that, I don't really care is somebody knows I fly economy or not..# of drinks is dependent on the length of the flight, I only got 4 on a 13 hour flight, and 1 on a 5 hour flight.. Now coffee and tea I could have as much as I wanted... And when they only fill the glass 1/2 full I tend to get more of them..
Well, don't be over sensitive, it is not the economy class thing. The reason I ask is because there are increasing flight rage due to over consumption of alcohol, and statistically usually take place in the economy class. There are people who can't stop drinking to get their money worth. My view is 2 glasses of alcohol max in a 12 hours flight and create a blacklist for offender so that they are not a risk to other passenger.
McGold

Montréal, Canada

#128 Mar 15, 2014
crystal wrote:
<quoted text>
Yeah they called only when they found out that the plane did not arrive. If Malaysian was in distressed why none in the passengers of Malaysian Airlines called their relatives? If the Malaysian Airlines 370 did call but there's no signal if someone turned off the communication system right? So, I think the Malaysian Airlines 370 is fine. They hide the plane somewhere in an isolated area. I have a feelings that they are all alive. Have you seen the movie, Without Trace ? I'm 150% that all passengers are okay. As I remember in a previous years that China Government /Military sabotage the Radar/Satellite. The only thing I suspected about it that China did it again because they are the one who's capable of sabotaging the Radar/satellite and now the Black Box also being turned off so no one would be able to trace them. cal sites
Interesting point of view.
I haven't seen the movie :Without a trace but I know the plot. Like most movies produced in North America, it has a happy ending. I hope the passengers are still alive but still advise their relatives to expect the worst.
Just in case you don't know, cellphone communications are supposed to be off all the time when you are on an airplane. This is a rule for all airlines. Cellphones emit radio waves. On a aeroplane, there are dozens of electronics-based systems known as avionics .These systems are used for navigation, communications with ground controls etc..and they emit radio waves. If these frequencies happen to be the same as those of the cellphones then readings and signals might be corrupted. So I don't understand why the Chinese relatives could still make calls to passengers.
I think the Chinese cellphones were not switched off and this might have caused wrong data readings in the cockpit and might have mislead the pilot to perform actions that he should not do in normal circumstances. My 5 cent
It is so Amazing

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

#129 Mar 15, 2014
Malaysia authority should bear the burden of the responsibility as they with their usual lackadaisical attitude took too long to respond. 6 hour!!!

They should have immediately responded within 3 hour and informed the military people. The Military radar will then treat this particular airliner as a threat. Let's not forget the skies are full of jetliners.

The MAS need to brush up their lackadaisical attitude towards security.

As for the ringing phone

1. Any industry experts will tell you that a ring tone don't necessary mean that the calls are going through.

2. The ringing is not actually ringing at the other phones yet. It is merely telling you that the network is in the process of finding and connecting to it.

3. So the sound has nothing to do with the actual ringing of the called party's device.

As for this remark "I think the Chinese cellphones were not switched off and this might have caused wrong data readings in the cockpit and might have mislead the pilot to perform actions that he should not do in normal circumstances. My 5 cent" by McGold

If this is true, the majority of North American flights will have gone haywire and Americans will be landing in Moscow instead of Mexico.
crystal

Burnaby, Canada

#130 Mar 15, 2014
McGold wrote:
<quoted text>
Interesting point of view.
I haven't seen the movie :Without a trace but I know the plot. Like most movies produced in North America, it has a happy ending. I hope the passengers are still alive but still advise their relatives to expect the worst.
Just in case you don't know, cellphone communications are supposed to be off all the time when you are on an airplane. This is a rule for all airlines. Cellphones emit radio waves. On a aeroplane, there are dozens of electronics-based systems known as avionics .These systems are used for navigation, communications with ground controls etc..and they emit radio waves. If these frequencies happen to be the same as those of the cellphones then readings and signals might be corrupted. So I don't understand why the Chinese relatives could still make calls to passengers.
I think the Chinese cellphones were not switched off and this might have caused wrong data readings in the cockpit and might have mislead the pilot to perform actions that he should not do in normal circumstances. My 5 cent
I made a mistake, it is " Knight and Day " starring Cameron Diaz and Tom Cruise.

“Enjoy life and be happy.”

Since: Apr 13

Location hidden

#131 Mar 16, 2014
At this point, everything sounds better than the news of a crash. We don't know exactly what happened, but at least things are starting to look like the people are still alive. That's what counts.
AAA

Chester, UK

#132 Mar 16, 2014
McGold wrote:
<quoted text>
Interesting point of view.
I haven't seen the movie :Without a trace but I know the plot. Like most movies produced in North America, it has a happy ending. I hope the passengers are still alive but still advise their relatives to expect the worst.
Just in case you don't know, cellphone communications are supposed to be off all the time when you are on an airplane. This is a rule for all airlines. Cellphones emit radio waves. On a aeroplane, there are dozens of electronics-based systems known as avionics .These systems are used for navigation, communications with ground controls etc..and they emit radio waves. If these frequencies happen to be the same as those of the cellphones then readings and signals might be corrupted. So I don't understand why the Chinese relatives could still make calls to passengers.
I think the Chinese cellphones were not switched off and this might have caused wrong data readings in the cockpit and might have mislead the pilot to perform actions that he should not do in normal circumstances. My 5 cent
You still don't understand how cell phones work. The receiving phone can be off, but caller phone can still ring. This is because a cell is responding and if the cell could not locate the receiving phone, the ring stops.

Of course the best scenario is the aircraft landed somewhere, and the Malaysian crews and passenger switch on the phones secretly but can't answer.

Since: Aug 13

Location hidden

#133 Mar 16, 2014
AAAA wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, don't be over sensitive, it is not the economy class thing. The reason I ask is because there are increasing flight rage due to over consumption of alcohol, and statistically usually take place in the economy class. There are people who can't stop drinking to get their money worth. My view is 2 glasses of alcohol max in a 12 hours flight and create a blacklist for offender so that they are not a risk to other passenger.
No offense was taken, I fly economy don't care who knows or don't... I'm not an expert but Ive never seen an alcohol induced problem in economy, what's more of an irritant is those that think gobs and gobs of perfume, or cologne are necessary.. That's far more annoying.
McGold

Montréal, Canada

#134 Mar 16, 2014
crystal wrote:
<quoted text>
I made a mistake, it is " Knight and Day " starring Cameron Diaz and Tom Cruise.
It sounds like a nice movie, I just read the storyline. So you think the Malaysian plane is some where. But where? Last time I heard the plane changed directions and headed somewhere else instead going according to the flightplan. Maybe the plane returned to Malaysia and is now somewhere in the jungle
crystal

Burnaby, Canada

#135 Mar 16, 2014
McGold wrote:
<quoted text>
It sounds like a nice movie, I just read the storyline. So you think the Malaysian plane is some where. But where? Last time I heard the plane changed directions and headed somewhere else instead going according to the flightplan. Maybe the plane returned to Malaysia and is now somewhere in the jungle
I think they are in China now. I think the plane was loaded of Gold . The 2 Iranian men that they're talking about, I think they are innocent. They don't know about what's going on except to seek asylum for freedom to other country with their false passport. Nothing else. They're not terrorist people. Those 2 girls inside the cockpits years ago, I think they were just fooling around. All men does that all the time when they got intoxicated.
I believe the plane is somewhere in China. I also believe that those other nationalities are good use for the Chinese Government.
crystal

Burnaby, Canada

#136 Mar 16, 2014
Is this the reason why the plane being diverted to other country? Because of Coking Coal Rivalry? Did the Chinese Government abducted these people so that they will be no longer rivalry in Coking Coal? Hmmm? Just speculating. You'll never know.
China's coking coal imports rose 41 per cent last year to 75.4 million tonnes as they replaced domestic product. Photo: Bloomberg

Mongolian Mining sees weakness ahead for coking coal prices

Oversupply will keep prices low, says Mongolian Mining, as firm posts US$58.1 million annual loss

Mongolian Mining, the nation's largest miner of coking coal sold primarily to China, expects the steel smelting ingredient's price to remain weak this year due to oversupply, although it has gained market share from rivals by expanding processing and logistics operations.

"I don't expect prices to fall below current levels, but I don't see meaningful price gain either, until demand and supply equilibrium is restored," chief executive Battsengel Gotov told a press conference.

He said prices of seaborne coking coal - mainly from Aus- tralia and Brazil - have been trading around the US$85 per tonne mark since the start of the year.

Mongolian Mining's average selling price of its mainstay product, hard coking coal, fell 15 per cent last year to US$92.10 a tonne from US$108.40 in 2012, owing to an estimated excess supply of over 30 million tonnes.

The excess is expected to fall to between 10 million and 15 million tonnes this year, helped partly by higher steel output in Europe and the United States, Gotov said.

The mainland's steel production growth is expected to slow to 4 per cent from 7.5 per cent last year as Beijing seeks to shift the economic growth driver from fixed-asset investment to consumption and services, according to the China Iron and Steel Association.

Mongolian Mining yesterday posted a net loss of US$58.1 million for last year, from US$2.5 million in 2012 as finance costs almost doubled to US$95.1 million.

Revenue fell 7.8 per cent to US$437.3 million as the 15 per cent fall in the average selling price offset a 26 per cent jump in hard coking coal sales volume to 4.3 million tonnes. The firm aims to sell six million tonnes this year.

The company's share price slid 7.9 per cent to 82 HK cents yesterday after the results.

Although the mainland's coking coal imports jumped 41 per cent last year to 75.4 million tonnes as low-cost imports replaced domestic products, Mongolia's share of the Chinese market fell to 20.4 per cent from 35.7 per cent while that of Australia surged to 40 per cent from 26.2 per cent.

Land-locked Mongolia's competitiveness is expected to be constrained until a government-built railway is completed next year or later, while Australian miners ramp up output to lower per-tonne fixed costs.

-
crystal

Burnaby, Canada

#137 Mar 16, 2014
I don’t see [price rises] until [there is] demand and supply equilibrium
BATTSENGEL GOTOV, MONGOLIAN MINING
crystal

Burnaby, Canada

#138 Mar 16, 2014
The Canadian couple, Muktesh Mukherjee and Xiaomo Bai, had enjoyed a romantic holiday in Vietnam. His Facebook page features photos of them smiling in the sun and sipping cocktails. The flight was supposed to return them home to Beijing and their two little boys.

Muktesh, 42, was an executive with U.S.-based XCoal Energy and Resources while Xiaomo, 37, graduated from Beijing’s Foreign Studies University. They met in Beijing and married in 2002, and went on to live in Montreal and Chicago before returning to China for work.

The couple took frequent vacations – with and without their sons. This time they stayed back with their grandmother. The youngest, Miles, will turn 3 in May. Xiaomo had posted a photo last month of the boys making snow angels and wrote,“The first snowfall of this winter!!!”

Neighbours at the Central Park apartment complex were in shock that there is so little information about what might have happened. Matthew McConkey, a close friend, said in an email that his heart is broken and he cannot stop crying.

“They were wonderful and welcoming people and exceedingly devoted parents to two fantastic little boys,” he said.“This is tragic beyond words.”

According to an uncle, Xiaomo’s father was in London when the Canadian embassy called to say that his daughter was missing. He was travelling back to Beijing and would go on to Kuala Lumpur with Canadian officials when, or if, search crews find a crash site.

crystal

Burnaby, Canada

#139 Mar 16, 2014
I know that they are still alive. They are in an isolated area that no foreign countries could detect them. I bet they hid the plane in a collapsible ran way somewhere in the end of China close to the Mongolian side with lots of fake trees. They put fake trees around and fake light rocks around so no one would notice them. They even put movable houses that has wheel on it. I know I sound like crazy to you but these are my guts telling me. They are all alive.
crystal

Burnaby, Canada

#140 Mar 16, 2014
or the plane landed on the Land mining area because it has a space area where Private small or Big plane could landed it. Just speculating but you'll never know.
McGold

Montréal, Canada

#141 Mar 16, 2014
crystal wrote:
The Canadian couple, Muktesh Mukherjee and Xiaomo Bai, had enjoyed a romantic holiday in Vietnam. His Facebook page features photos of them smiling in the sun and sipping cocktails. The flight was supposed to return them home to Beijing and their two little boys.
Muktesh, 42, was an executive with U.S.-based XCoal Energy and Resources while Xiaomo, 37, graduated from Beijing’s Foreign Studies University. They met in Beijing and married in 2002, and went on to live in Montreal and Chicago before returning to China for work.
The couple took frequent vacations – with and without their sons. This time they stayed back with their grandmother. The youngest, Miles, will turn 3 in May. Xiaomo had posted a photo last month of the boys making snow angels and wrote,“The first snowfall of this winter!!!”
Neighbours at the Central Park apartment complex were in shock that there is so little information about what might have happened. Matthew McConkey, a close friend, said in an email that his heart is broken and he cannot stop crying.
“They were wonderful and welcoming people and exceedingly devoted parents to two fantastic little boys,” he said.“This is tragic beyond words.”
According to an uncle, Xiaomo’s father was in London when the Canadian embassy called to say that his daughter was missing. He was travelling back to Beijing and would go on to Kuala Lumpur with Canadian officials when, or if, search crews find a crash site.
I see. So there were two Canadians on board of the plane, one of Chinese descent and her husband.
McGold

Montréal, Canada

#142 Mar 16, 2014
crystal wrote:
I know that they are still alive. They are in an isolated area that no foreign countries could detect them. I bet they hid the plane in a collapsible ran way somewhere in the end of China close to the Mongolian side with lots of fake trees. They put fake trees around and fake light rocks around so no one would notice them. They even put movable houses that has wheel on it. I know I sound like crazy to you but these are my guts telling me. They are all alive.
For the Chinese, everyone is alive. It's just that they go to another world called the 'yin' world when time comes. This world is the 'yang' world. People in the 'yang' world cannot see nor touch those who are in the 'yin' world. Maybe you know this already. So yes, they are definitely alive.
crystal

Burnaby, Canada

#143 Mar 16, 2014
McGold wrote:
<quoted text>
I see. So there were two Canadians on board of the plane, one of Chinese descent and her husband.
her husband is from India and she's from China and they're both Canadians who lived in Montreal . The husband work as an executive at Xcoal Energy Company based in USA.
crystal

Burnaby, Canada

#144 Mar 16, 2014
Another information-

Nationalities of people on board Flight 370

Australia 6
Canada 2
China 152
France 4
Hongkong 1
India 5
Indonesia 7
Iran 2
Malaysia 38
Netherlands 1
New Zealand 2
Russia 1
Taiwan 1
Ukraine 2
United States 3
----------
227 + 12 Malaysian crews
crystal

Burnaby, Canada

#145 Mar 16, 2014
Passengers and crew

Malaysia Airlines released the names and nationalities of the 227 passengers and 12 crew, based on the flight manifest.[117]
Crew

All the crew members were Malaysian. The flight's captain was 53-year-old Zaharie Ahmad Shah of Penang; he joined Malaysia Airlines in 1981 and had 18,365 hours of flying experience.[118] Zaharie was also an examiner qualified to conduct simulator tests for pilots.[119]

The first officer was 27-year-old Fariq Abdul Hamid, an employee of Malaysia Airlines since 2007, with 2,763 flying hours.[120][121] Fariq was transitioning to the Boeing 777-200 after having completed his simulator training.[121]
Passengers

Two-thirds of the 227 passengers were Chinese citizens, including a group of 19 artists with 6 family members and 4 staff returning from a calligraphy exhibition of their work in Kuala Lumpur; 38 passengers were Malaysian. The remaining passengers came from 13 different countries.[122] Of the total, 20 were employees of Freescale Semiconductor, a company based in Austin, Texas – 12 were from Malaysia and 8 from China.[123][124]

Malaysia Airlines sent a team of carers and volunteers to provide assistance to family members of the passengers.[125] In its press releases, the carrier stated that it would bear the expenses of bringing family members of the passengers to Kuala Lumpur and providing them with accommodation, medical care, and counselling.[126] Altogether, 115 family members of the Chinese passengers flew to Kuala Lumpur.[127] Other family members chose to remain in China, fearing they would feel too isolated in Malaysia.[128] The airline offered an ex gratia condolence payment of US$5,000 to the family of each passenger,[129] but relatives considered the conditions unacceptable and asked the airline to review them.[130]

Of the total, 20 were employees of Freescale Semiconductor, a company based in Austin, Texas – 12 were from Malaysia and 8 from China

Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. is an American company that produces and designs embedded hardware, with 17 billion semiconductor chips in use around the world. The company focuses on the automotive, consumer, industrial and networking markets with its product portfolio including microprocessors, microcontrollers, digital signal processors, digital signal controllers, sensors, RF power ICs and power management ICs. In addition, the company offers software and development tools to support product development. The company also holds an extensive patent portfolio, including approximately 6,100 patent families. The company is headquartered in Austin, Texas with design, research and development, manufacturing and sales operations in more than 20 countries.

Freescale is currently ranked 7th among the semiconductor sales leaders in the United States and is ranked 16th worldwide.
crystal

Burnaby, Canada

#146 Mar 16, 2014
Freescale was one of the first semiconductor companies in the world, having started as a division of Motorola in Phoenix, Arizona in 1948[2] and then becoming autonomous by the divestiture of the Semiconductor Products Sector of Motorola in 2004. In 1955, a Motorola transistor for car radios was the world’s first commercial high-power transistor. It was also Motorola’s first mass-produced semiconductor device.
In the 1960s, one of the U. S. space program's goals was to land a man on the moon and return him safely to Earth. In 1968, NASA began manned Apollo flights that led to the first lunar landing in July 1969. Apollo 11 was particularly significant for hundreds of employees involved in designing, testing and producing its electronics. A division of Motorola, which became Freescale Semiconductor, supplied thousands of semiconductor devices, ground-based tracking and checkout equipment, and 12 on-board tracking and communications units. An "up-data link" in the Apollo's command module received signals from Earth to relay to other on-board systems. A transponder received and transmitted voice and television signals and scientific data.[3]
Also that year, Motorola’s technologies were used to introduce the first two-way mobile radio with a fully transistorized power supply and receiver for cars.[4]
Motorola has continued its growth in the networking and communications sector in later years, providing the tools behind the radio transponder that delivered the first words from the moon in 1969, and going on to develop the first prototype of the first analog mobile phone in 1973.[5]
The company’s first microprocessor (MC6800 8-bit) was introduced in 1974, and was used in automotive, computing and video game applications.[6]
Motorola’s next generation 32-bit microprocessor, the MC68000, led the wave of technologies that spurred the computing revolution in 1984, powering devices from companies such as Apple, Commodore, Atari, Sun, and Hewlett Packard.[7]
In the 1990s, Motorola’s technology was the driving force behind intelligent power switches for anti-lock brake systems, one of the first microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) inertial sensor for automotive airbags, and Motorola’s MPC5200 microprocessor deployed telematic systems for General Motors’ OnStar systems.[8]
Since then, Freescale has continued to provide the technology behind consumer, medical, networking and automotive products from microprocessors for the world’s first tubing-free wireless insulin pump,[9] to and automotive microcontrollers for efficient engine design. Freescale’s motion-sensing accelerometer powers the interactivity of the Guitar Hero video games.[10] The number one provider of eReader processors worldwide is Freescale.[11]
In 2011, the company launched the industry’s first multimode wireless base station processor family that scales from small to large cells – integrating DSP and communications processor technologies to realize a true "base station-on-chip".[12] In addition, a recent ABI Research market study report states that Freescale owns 60% share of the Radio Frequency (RF) semiconductor device market.
Also in 2011, Freescale announced the company's first magnetometer for location tracking in smart mobile devices.[13] With the partnership of McLaren Electronic Systems, they helped the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series vehicles convert from carburetors to fuel injection starting in 2012.[14][15][16] On March 8, 2014, Freescale announced that twenty of its employees were passengers aboard Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. That plane, carrying the Freescale employees, is currently missing.[17]

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