Is China's Economy Still Booming

Created by snowflake on Jul 15, 2013

340 votes

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Definitely

Don't Know

Going Down Quick

The Bubble and Crash is Coming

XYZ YOUR ZIPPER IS OPEN

United States

#128 Aug 22, 2013
here u go china bashers!

Oil rises as China, Europe factories ramp up

Full story: Seattle Post-Intelligencer

Benchmark oil for October delivery was up 46 cents to $104.31 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange .

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#129 Aug 22, 2013
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE wrote:
<quoted text>
what ever buddy... internal debt you can just push under the carpet/or back up like the USA is doing with its local States the vast majority of them who can declare bankruptcy as we speak
and what China can do with its local government debt...
the fact is there is no way of getting around a sovereign debt default, there is no country or organization, that can back up a country like the USA and its external debt
which you seem to think is a good thing for a country like the USA... but suddenly a bad thing for China with their internal debt
I have already shown you in the past Vulture funds being able to tie up a Country in court over Sovereign debt defaults
and I have shown you the American citzens owed to the tune of 10 trillion of that US debt
would be the first to class action their own country for their money back...
but even after that today you still are jabbering on how sovereign debt is the same as local internal debt
Like I told you, Vulture funds case down little 3rd world countries, they can not do that to the USA titan, hell they did do jack to Russia whatmore the US, you are crazy. Any company or nation seen as a threat to National security is bound to receive less accomodating market place and the US is the biggest consumer country.

The US also has a currency that is the reserve currency of over 75% of the nations of the world, so a drop in the dollar which would proceed before a default would cause these countries to buy up more while the its cheap in order to keep the value of their reserves andd because EVERYBODY KNOWS THE USD ALWAYS BOUNCES BACK. This make default impossible because the FED would just print more money while keeping value of the USD.

The US is the second largest manufacturer in the world, a drop in the USD usually has exports going again as seen in 2007
2 Cents

Hsinchu, Taiwan

#130 Aug 22, 2013
XYZ YOUR ZIPPER IS OPEN wrote:
here u go china bashers!
Oil rises as China, Europe factories ramp up
Full story: Seattle Post-Intelligencer
Benchmark oil for October delivery was up 46 cents to $104.31 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange .
Most of the world is relieved that China is still an engine of growth. It is the leading trading country now so its economic health affects just about everyone. We can compete with China if we weren't in a state of perpetual war and just stopped minding everyone's business.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Richmond, Canada

#131 Aug 23, 2013
dreadman82 wrote:
<quoted text>
China's total FDI inflow into the EU is worth at $59 billion, FDI from the EU into China and the rest of the world is around 350 billion Euros. You see one Rich Rapper buying a mansion doesnt mean the living standards are improving for all the blacks.
thats what you dont get... people like you are still talking FDI

when im talking Ethnic Chinese buying up your houses... and sending their kids to your schools..and taking away your jobs...

they are settling down and making roots...

while major companies responsible for the lions share of FDI, tend to pull up stakes and run for the hills when the going gets bad...

your thinking is too narrow minded, and inflexible...yet you accuse the Chinese of not being able to think outside the box

for me I dont care about a State owned Chinese investment in a mine in Africa

but the Chinese people who come with it and the roots they set down after the company goes away

your still thinking China... China... China

im thinking China has always been about absorption and assimilation and keeping things ogether

and for me personally, what will get Chinese to migrate out of China

and do things like this

.
.

So it was that Vientiane, the capital city of Laos, has seen something of an absence at its heart with the lack of a Chinatown. Of course, support for the Pathet Lao from the Soviet Union was also a contributory factor but the situation is now changing rapidly. Not only are a small number of Chinese pioneers starting to establish businesses in the city, often in tourism or service industries, but rather larger groups of Chinese are entering the country through being hired as construction workers.

The Asian Development Bank is leading attempts to integrate Laos more closely into the rapid economic development being enjoyed in many other parts of Southeast Asia through, among other means, an extensive road-building program. This will link Kunming in Yunnan province in the north to, ultimately, Singapore in the south and central Vietnam in the east with, perhaps one day, India in the west.

Thousands of Chinese labourers have entered Laos to help build these roads and, once their contracts have expired, many prefer to stay on to build businesses in areas where they have spotted opportunities.

Tens of thousands of Chinese are now believed to be in the sparsely-populated north of Laos – accurate numbers are not known – and the Lao government, acutely conscious of the difficulties its low population and low population density have caused, are expressing fears that a parallel state is being established in the northern border region. That is what already appears to have happened in Burma.

http://suite101.com/article/the-chinese-in-la...
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Richmond, Canada

#132 Aug 23, 2013
dreadman82 wrote:
<quoted text>
Like I told you, Vulture funds case down little 3rd world countries, they can not do that to the USA titan, hell they did do jack to Russia whatmore the US, you are crazy. Any company or nation seen as a threat to National security is bound to receive less accomodating market place and the US is the biggest consumer country.
The US also has a currency that is the reserve currency of over 75% of the nations of the world, so a drop in the dollar which would proceed before a default would cause these countries to buy up more while the its cheap in order to keep the value of their reserves andd because EVERYBODY KNOWS THE USD ALWAYS BOUNCES BACK. This make default impossible because the FED would just print more money while keeping value of the USD.
The US is the second largest manufacturer in the world, a drop in the USD usually has exports going again as seen in 2007
what ever you think buddy I just showed you a US court allowing a vulture fund to seize assets in the USA... just last year

and once again your narrow minded thinking... forgets/pretends

that the US government owing 10 trillion dollars to the average gun toting, class action happy Americans...

is going to be brushed away

LOL
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Richmond, Canada

#133 Aug 23, 2013
dreadman82 wrote:
<quoted text>
The EU with only about 700 billion is the biggest market power chairman Snowflake
biggest power after taking the land, wealth and lives from others over the last 200 years...

maybe thats why Europeans like you are so afraid of China's rise once again

expecting some payback...

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#135 Aug 23, 2013
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE wrote:
<quoted text>
biggest power after taking the land, wealth and lives from others over the last 200 years...
maybe thats why Europeans like you are so afraid of China's rise once again
expecting some payback...
Oh I am afraid of how badly they will fall thats all while crack pots like you keep not seeing the obvious future instead consentrating on myths that will NEVER HAPPEN.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#136 Aug 23, 2013
2 Cents wrote:
<quoted text>
Most of the world is relieved that China is still an engine of growth. It is the leading trading country now so its economic health affects just about everyone. We can compete with China if we weren't in a state of perpetual war and just stopped minding everyone's business.
The emerging markets like China are no longer the lead contributors to growth to the world’s GDP, they have been replaced by the developed nations.

Japan, the U.S. and the rest of the developed markets are contributing roughly 60% of the $2.4T in new economic growth according to Bridgewater Associates.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Richmond, Canada

#138 Aug 23, 2013
dreadman82 wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh I am afraid of how badly they will fall thats all while crack pots like you keep not seeing the obvious future instead consentrating on myths that will NEVER HAPPEN.
yes lets listen to the likes of you still stuck in the past, unable to process new information years after it has been presented to you
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Richmond, Canada

#139 Aug 23, 2013
dreadman82 wrote:
<quoted text>
The emerging markets like China are no longer the lead contributors to growth to the world’s GDP, they have been replaced by the developed nations.
Japan, the U.S. and the rest of the developed markets are contributing roughly 60% of the $2.4T in new economic growth according to Bridgewater Associates.
Emerging markets key for foreign trade
Updated: 2012-01-11 07:50

By Li Jiabao (China Daily)

Export volumes to developing countries will be expanded

BEIJING - China's trade volume with the emerging markets grew at a faster rate than with its traditional markets in 2011.

Overall, foreign trade grew by 22.5 percent year-on-year to a record $3.6 trillion.
The volume of trade with Brazil rose by 34.5 percent, that with Russia grew by 42.7 percent, while trade with South Africa increased by 76.7 percent, according to data released by China's General Administration of Customs on Tuesday.

Trade with members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) increased by 23.9 percent in 2011 year-on-year, while trade with the European Union (EU) registered year-on-year growth of 18.3 percent. Sino-US trade rose by 15.9 percent last year.

The nation will expand its trading level with emerging markets this year, as it aims to diversify and offset a slowdown in exports caused by the deepening EU debt crisis and the troubled US economy, said Zhong Shan, vice-minister of commerce, on Monday.

As the global economy slows, China's traditional export markets, the US and EU, are troubled by debt crises or high unemployment. Demand from these markets will register limited growth, while the emerging markets are seeing economic expansion, said Jin Baisong, deputy director of the department of Chinese Trade and Studies at the Chinese Academy of International Trade and Economic Cooperation affiliated to the Ministry of Commerce.

"Fast-developing emerging markets will be the main targets for foreign trade in the coming years," he said.

Song Hong, a senior researcher at the Institute of World Economy and Politics at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said: "Emerging markets undergoing industrialization will be the future destinations for China to expand its foreign trade."

Emerging markets such as Vietnam, Indonesia, Mexico and other members of the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) have large-scale economies and have maintained a rapid pace of development in recent years, and will have huge demand for Chinese exports in the future, Song said.

He added that the emerging markets will play an increasingly important role in accelerating China's export growth because "they were less affected by the 2008 financial crisis than the developed countries".
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Richmond, Canada

#140 Aug 23, 2013
dreadman82 wrote:
<quoted text>
The emerging markets like China are no longer the lead contributors to growth to the world’s GDP, they have been replaced by the developed nations.
Japan, the U.S. and the rest of the developed markets are contributing roughly 60% of the $2.4T in new economic growth according to Bridgewater Associates.
When we compare Latin America to other emerging countries, and particularly those located in Asia, we observe that Chinese competition is not a problem in general terms. Thus, we might conclude that there are few, if any, short term trade costs for Latin America, if any, from the trade point of view.

In fact most Latin American countries are witnessing a tremendous increase in their exports to China. Over the past years, China has, for example, become Brazil’s fastest-growing export market, purchasing 80 percent more from Brazil in 2003 than in 2002.

Bilateral trade has more than quadrupled over the past four years. Five commodities - soybeans, iron ore, steel, soy oil and wood - accounted for 75 percent of Brazil’s exports to China last year.

China bought 6.2 percent of Brazil’s USD 73 billion of exports in 2003, up from a level of 1.4 percent in 1999. Some big Brazilian companies like Aracruz, Latin America’s largest wood pulp maker had more than doubled its sales to China in the past two years to 12 percent of the company’s exports

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#141 Aug 23, 2013
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE wrote:
<quoted text>
Emerging markets key for foreign trade
Updated: 2012-01-11 07:50
By Li Jiabao (China Daily)
Export volumes to developing countries will be expanded
BEIJING - China's trade volume with the emerging markets grew at a faster rate than with its traditional markets in 2011.
Overall, foreign trade grew by 22.5 percent year-on-year to a record $3.6 trillion.
The volume of trade with Brazil rose by 34.5 percent, that with Russia grew by 42.7 percent, while trade with South Africa increased by 76.7 percent, according to data released by China's General Administration of Customs on Tuesday.
Trade with members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) increased by 23.9 percent in 2011 year-on-year, while trade with the European Union (EU) registered year-on-year growth of 18.3 percent. Sino-US trade rose by 15.9 percent last year.
The nation will expand its trading level with emerging markets this year, as it aims to diversify and offset a slowdown in exports caused by the deepening EU debt crisis and the troubled US economy, said Zhong Shan, vice-minister of commerce, on Monday.
As the global economy slows, China's traditional export markets, the US and EU, are troubled by debt crises or high unemployment. Demand from these markets will register limited growth, while the emerging markets are seeing economic expansion, said Jin Baisong, deputy director of the department of Chinese Trade and Studies at the Chinese Academy of International Trade and Economic Cooperation affiliated to the Ministry of Commerce.
"Fast-developing emerging markets will be the main targets for foreign trade in the coming years," he said.
Song Hong, a senior researcher at the Institute of World Economy and Politics at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said: "Emerging markets undergoing industrialization will be the future destinations for China to expand its foreign trade."
Emerging markets such as Vietnam, Indonesia, Mexico and other members of the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) have large-scale economies and have maintained a rapid pace of development in recent years, and will have huge demand for Chinese exports in the future, Song said.
He added that the emerging markets will play an increasingly important role in accelerating China's export growth because "they were less affected by the 2008 financial crisis than the developed countries".
That information is last years information dummy, we all know that around that year the US was still in crisis control, Europe was deep in crisis and, Brazil, India and China were enjoying their 15 minutes of fame.

It always happens that when Developed countries get into economic woes their sare of the GDP growth of the world decreases, now all the old players are back so we can put the B Team....the BRIC team back on the poverty bench.

It is very unusual for a developing country to led world economic growth, even though idealically they should because they have all the making up to do to catchup with the developed world.
2 Cents

Hsinchu, Taiwan

#142 Aug 23, 2013
dreadman82 wrote:
<quoted text>
The emerging markets like China are no longer the lead contributors to growth to the world’s GDP, they have been replaced by the developed nations.
Japan, the U.S. and the rest of the developed markets are contributing roughly 60% of the $2.4T in new economic growth according to Bridgewater Associates.
I never claimed that China was the world's largest contributor to growth just the country with the most trade. Anyway, that the developed markets account for only 60 percent of new economic growth doesn't seem like anything to brag about. Just saying.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#143 Aug 23, 2013
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE wrote:
<quoted text>
When we compare Latin America to other emerging countries, and particularly those located in Asia, we observe that Chinese competition is not a problem in general terms. Thus, we might conclude that there are few, if any, short term trade costs for Latin America, if any, from the trade point of view.
In fact most Latin American countries are witnessing a tremendous increase in their exports to China. Over the past years, China has, for example, become Brazil’s fastest-growing export market, purchasing 80 percent more from Brazil in 2003 than in 2002.
Bilateral trade has more than quadrupled over the past four years. Five commodities - soybeans, iron ore, steel, soy oil and wood - accounted for 75 percent of Brazil’s exports to China last year.
China bought 6.2 percent of Brazil’s USD 73 billion of exports in 2003, up from a level of 1.4 percent in 1999. Some big Brazilian companies like Aracruz, Latin America’s largest wood pulp maker had more than doubled its sales to China in the past two years to 12 percent of the company’s exports
Actually Brazilian exports to China are drying up!!!

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#144 Aug 23, 2013
2 Cents wrote:
<quoted text>
I never claimed that China was the world's largest contributor to growth just the country with the most trade. Anyway, that the developed markets account for only 60 percent of new economic growth doesn't seem like anything to brag about. Just saying.
Uh, yes it is if you consider that the entire Developed world accounts for just 14.6% of the world population.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#145 Aug 23, 2013
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE wrote:
<quoted text>
biggest power after taking the land, wealth and lives from others over the last 200 years...
maybe thats why Europeans like you are so afraid of China's rise once again
expecting some payback...
Again I have seen this movie before in Japan, I am only afraid for the Chinese not of them. They have no say in their government and are still amoung the worlds lowest income countries, Brazil has a higher living standard. I fear that while a lost generation in Japan was bearble, the PRC Chinese one will not, it will be desasterous.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#146 Aug 23, 2013
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE wrote:
<quoted text>
yes lets listen to the likes of you still stuck in the past, unable to process new information years after it has been presented to you
Okay let me process this new informaion, China has internal debt of 200%, now lets process old information..Japan in 1990 had internal debt of 60% and yet this was enough to drive over the edge.

Now I made my point as simple as I can possibly can, please process this information for yourself......rather than pointing to some individual cases of Chinese buying houses in slum dog areas of Canada, will you?
2 Cents

Hsinchu, Taiwan

#147 Aug 23, 2013
dreadman82 wrote:
<quoted text>
Uh, yes it is if you consider that the entire Developed world accounts for just 14.6% of the world population.
Not really. China still contributes far more to world growth than any one country in the developed world.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#148 Aug 23, 2013
2 Cents wrote:
<quoted text>
Not really. China still contributes far more to world growth than any one country in the developed world.
The GDP value of China represents 13.27 percent of the world economy, it is growing at 7.5%, 7.7% if you are a dreamer. That is a 600 billion USD EXPANSION.

The GDP value of the United States represents 25.30 percent of the world economy. The EU GDP is 26.8% of the global GDP, together the EU and the US do not make up for more than 13.5% of the world's population yet will pump into the world economy a wooping $1.2tr expansion altogether.

Oh yeah and we just had a crisis, imagine when we not in crisis.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#149 Aug 23, 2013
2 Cents wrote:
<quoted text>
Not really. China still contributes far more to world growth than any one country in the developed world.
China represents a full 20% of world population, it should be leading on all charts except it adheres to a form of government that has never worked anywhere, it adheres to economic models that have again and again failed in Japan and every dictatorships.

China is therefore still the sick giant, once upon a time China was nuumber one because it had able bodied leaders, inventive population and private enterprize, now they adhere to the opposite of all these and are destined to fail.

2 YEARS to get into BALL POSITION

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