What is Canadian residential Voltage ...

What is Canadian residential Voltage - 120V or 240V?

Posted in the Canada Forum

What s Voltage in Canada

Auburn Hills, MI

#1 Jan 10, 2008
What is Canadian residential Voltage - 120V or 240V? Can Canadians buy electronics and electrical appliances in the U.S. and then run them in Canada by just plugging them into an outlet, or is a Voltage converter or power supply required?

“Living Life One Ride at a Time”

Since: Oct 07

Albert Bridge, Nova Scotia

#2 Jan 10, 2008
What s Voltage in Canada wrote:
What is Canadian residential Voltage - 120V or 240V? Can Canadians buy electronics and electrical appliances in the U.S. and then run them in Canada by just plugging them into an outlet, or is a Voltage converter or power supply required?
Canadian residential voltage is 120v the same as the US. Electric ranges and clothes dryers run on 240v. What you can plug into your house, we can plug into ours.
What s Voltage in Canada

Auburn Hills, MI

#3 Jan 10, 2008
Thanks, I appreciate the answer.

“Continually Updated from Net”

Since: Jan 07

A PBS place in an MTV world

#4 Jan 10, 2008
We have a Voltage Monitor Online here & even though

we're Paying for 120, many days we're sure NOT getting it

eg. down to 100 Volts or Less, almost approaching Brown Out of Electronic devices &

Europe home items that we use here run on 240 Volts
sam t

Woodbridge, Canada

#5 Dec 15, 2012
I'm getting confuse here, I need to buy a machine from
china and I want to make sure the right eletricity voltage for it , is the household eletricity voltage 110 or 120, can I buy the machine with 110 V or 120 v ac
please clear my mind
QUITTNER

Toronto, Canada

#6 Dec 16, 2012
3:11 pm, Sunday, December 16, 2012:
RE: What is Canadian residential Voltage - 120V or 240V?
..... If you want to use a machine in a given country, then, if possible, buy that machine in that country.
..... There are many complaints here about unemployment here being much higher than it should/could be. No wonder, if so many people buy items that were made in China or some other country of Asia!
VAC

Brampton, Canada

#7 Dec 16, 2012
110 to 120 volts AC runs things here so why option 110 or 120 above ???
QUITTNER

Toronto, Canada

#8 Dec 16, 2012
5:13 pm, Sunday, December 16, 2012:
RE:What is Canadian residential Voltage - 120V or 240V?
.... VAC, I suppose it depends on where you live. Your home voltage may be derived from a pole transformer that gets 3-phase voltage and supplies 120V and also 120 times the root of 3 (1.732)=208 Volt. or that is single-phase only and provides 120 and twice that=240 Volt, or ....
..... Do have a look at what is written at the transformer(s) at the pole and also look at your home electricity meter's label! But the actual voltage may vary slightly over time, depending on the amount of load taken from the transformer locally and also on the voltage regulator operation, if any, at the local substation.
pratheesh

Calicut, India

#9 Jul 20, 2013
I'm getting confuse here, I need to buy a mixy from
india and I want to make sure the right eletricity voltage canada edmonton for it , is the household eletricity voltage 110 or 240 can I buy the machine with 110 V or 240 v ac
please clear my mind
RAJNISH PATEL

Ahmedabad, India

#10 Nov 8, 2013
hiii
i am coming to canada.
i have my iball tab.
so, can u tell me dat weather i have to change my tablet charger or not?
or
i have to buy a tablet from there??
the problem is just about to charge the tablet
Ken from UK

Kettering, UK

#11 Jan 23, 2014
QUITTNER wrote:
5:13 pm, Sunday, December 16, 2012:
RE:What is Canadian residential Voltage - 120V or 240V?
.... VAC, I suppose it depends on where you live. Your home voltage may be derived from a pole transformer that gets 3-phase voltage and supplies 120V and also 120 times the root of 3 (1.732)=208 Volt. or that is single-phase only and provides 120 and twice that=240 Volt, or ....
..... Do have a look at what is written at the transformer(s) at the pole and also look at your home electricity meter's label! But the actual voltage may vary slightly over time, depending on the amount of load taken from the transformer locally and also on the voltage regulator operation, if any, at the local substation.
Good afternoon Folks
My wife and I are planning a holiday travelling from Calgary to Vancouver, and stopping in Bed & Breakfast accommodation on the way. I have a CPAP breathing machine for my Sleep Apnoea, which in the UK runs on 220v (though it draws only a small current via a step down transformer to give a 24V DC output. Question is will it work OK on Canadian AC if it varies as has been said from 100V to 120, and in some places is 220V?
Any advice would be really welcome
Thanks,
Ken A
Dave

Ottawa, Canada

#12 Apr 16, 2014
Ken from UK wrote:
<quoted text>
Good afternoon Folks
My wife and I are planning a holiday travelling from Calgary to Vancouver, and stopping in Bed & Breakfast accommodation on the way. I have a CPAP breathing machine for my Sleep Apnoea, which in the UK runs on 220v (though it draws only a small current via a step down transformer to give a 24V DC output. Question is will it work OK on Canadian AC if it varies as has been said from 100V to 120, and in some places is 220V?
Any advice would be really welcome
Thanks,
Ken A
Hi Ken,
The typical receptacle here is nominally 120V, 60 Hz. Devices designed for 110 to 130V should work without any additional adapter. Likely, there will be a 120V, 60Hz receptacle every 6 feet (2 metres) along the walls of your accomodations.
If you bring a clock designed for 50 Hz, it might run 20% faster.
Residentially, we only use 240V for powering an electric clothes dryer, or an oven (range / cooker).
Your CPAP machine may be designed well enough to tolerate various electrical standards - check the manual for input requirements. It may be as simple as swapping a detachable cord - check with your CPAP retailer for travel options.
If not, you've got 2 easy options: 1) Bring a step up transformer. 2) Buy a 120VAC to 24 VDC adapter for about $20 CAD (10 pounds sterling) when you get here. We've got an electronics chain called "The Source by Circuit City" (previously known as "Radio Shack")- that sells various adapters, batteries, radios, and other mass-produced consumer electronics.
Likely, any variation between 110 and 125 is not noticeable... I use CPAP myself... the electronics in medical devices is designed to filter out such variation, and provide constant pressure regardless.
Best Regards,
Dave - Bach of Electrical Engineering, Halifax, Canada.
Brian

Diss, UK

#13 May 12, 2014
I am sending some swimming pool pumps and
Heater to Ontario and need to know if they will work on the electrical system
They are 220-240 volt 50 hz .
Can a Canadian electrician provide a supply that works this equipment.
Brian
Ali

Bremen, Germany

#14 Jan 18, 2015
I am moving from germany to canada and i don't know can i use my refrigerator / dishwasher/washingmachin/ in canada.
probably not

Georgetown, Canada

#15 Jan 20, 2015
stay in monkeyland

Toronto, Canada

#16 Jan 21, 2015
No all third world monkey electronics will explode when plugged in.
DieYouRacist

Bay, Philippines

#17 Feb 11, 2015
stay in monkeyland wrote:
No all third world monkey electronics will explode when plugged in.
Well, most of electronics nowadays are made from what you call monkeyland you freakin' racist. So probably you are not using any electronics now coz it will explode! Lol. Just stay in you aholeland where you belong and stare at the wall coz you can't use any electronics.
Soar

Sydney, Australia

#18 Feb 11, 2015
We should exterminate whites by giving them faulty electronics because whites are nothing but lowly chimps.
stay in monkeyland

Toronto, Canada

#19 Feb 12, 2015
DieYouRacist wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, most of electronics nowadays are made from what you call monkeyland you freakin' racist. So probably you are not using any electronics now coz it will explode! Lol. Just stay in you aholeland where you belong and stare at the wall coz you can't use any electronics.
Well, then call your dirty third-world call-center coolies and ask them about the voltage input for your shoddy third-world electronics. You'll find that they haven't a clue, and will suggest that you turn your device off and on, which is their standard response for any issue.

And if you think your third-world s*#%holes are such a paradise, you should stay there, and stop stinking up our countries. You're right that manufacturing has moved overseas. It is due to low wages and the fact that third-world monkey-slaves will put up with poor working conditions and pollution from factories. The product designs still come from the first-world, except for when they are stolen. Even then the sad third-world monkeys can only scratch their flea-ridden heads at what they've stolen, and have no ability to innovate.

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