It's the Guns, Stupid

It's the Guns, Stupid

There are 103299 comments on the Truthdig story from Apr 20, 2007, titled It's the Guns, Stupid. In it, Truthdig reports that:

“And that's the end of the issue”

Why do we have the same futile argument every time there is a mass killing? Advocates of gun control try to open a discussion about whether more reasonable weapons statutes might reduce the number of violent ... via Truthdig

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Hua Hin, Thailand

#97857 Jan 22, 2013
Fthupherrin thukkatash!
fffffff

Chisinau, Moldova

#97858 Jan 22, 2013
Daffy Dumas Duck is an animated cartoon character produced by Warner Bros. He has appeared in cartoon series such as Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies, where he usually has been depicted as the best friend and occasional arch-rival of Bugs Bunny. Daffy was one of the first of the new "screwball" characters that emerged in the late 1930s to replace traditional everyman characters who were more popular earlier in the decade[citation needed], such as Mickey Mouse and Popeye. Daffy starred in 133 shorts in the Golden Age, making him the third-most frequent character in the Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies cartoons, behind Bugs Bunny's 166 appearances and Porky Pig's 159 appearances.
Daffy was #14 on TV Guide's list of top 50 best cartoon characters[1] and was featured on one of the issue's four covers as Duck Dodgers with Porky Pig and the Powerpuff Girls (all of which are Time Warner-owned characters).[2]Daffy first appeared on April 17, 1937, in Porky's Duck Hunt, directed by Tex Avery and animated by Bob Clampett. The cartoon is a standard hunter/prey pairing for which Leon Schlesinger's studio was famous, but Daffy (barely more than an unnamed bit player in this short) was something new to moviegoers: an assertive, completely unrestrained, combative protagonist. Clampett later recalled:
"At that time, audiences weren't accustomed to seeing a cartoon character do these things. And so, when it hit the theaters it was an explosion. People would leave the theaters talking about this daffy duck."[3]
This early Daffy is less anthropomorphic and resembles a "normal" duck. In fact, the only aspects of the character that have remained consistent through the years are his voice characterization by Mel Blanc and his black feathers with a white neck ring. Blanc's characterization of Daffy holds the world record for the longest characterization of one animated character by his or her original actor: 52 years.
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Hua Hin, Thailand

#97859 Jan 22, 2013
fffffff wrote:
A male duck is called a drake, a female is called a duck. Babies are called ducklings.
Ducks are related to geese and swans. The duck is the smallest of them all and have shorter necks and wings and a stout body.
Ducks can live from 2-12 years, depending on the species.Ducks have webbed feet, which act like paddles. A duck waddles instead of walking because of its webbed feet.
Ducks' feet have no nerves or blood vessels. This means ducks never feel the cold, even if they swim in icy cold water.
Ducks provide us with eggs, meat and feathers.
Ducks' feathers are waterproof. There is a special gland that produces oil near the tail that spreads and covers the outer coat of feathers. Beneath this waterproof layer are fluffy and soft feathers to keep the duck warm.
Ducks keep clean by preening themselves with their beaks, which they do often. They also line their nests with feathers plucked from their chest.
Ducks were once wild until they were domesticated by the Chinese many hundreds of years ago.
Breeds
Most farm ducks are of a species called "Pekin". It is harder to tell a male from a female with the Pekin ducks A male duck is called a drake, a female is called a duck. Babies are called ducklings.
Ducks are related to geese and swans. The duck is the smallest of them all and have shorter necks and wings and a stout body.
Ducks can live from 2-12 years, depending on the species.Ducks have webbed feet, which act like paddles. A duck waddles instead of walking because of its webbed feet.
Ducks' feet have no nerves or blood vessels. This means ducks never feel the cold, even if they swim in icy cold water.
Ducks provide us with eggs, meat and feathers.
Ducks' feathers are waterproof. There is a special gland that produces oil near the tail that spreads and covers the outer coat of feathers. Beneath this waterproof layer are fluffy and soft feathers to keep the duck warm.
Ducks keep clean by preening themselves with their beaks, which they do often. They also line their nests with feathers plucked from their chest.
Ducks were once wild until they were domesticated by the Chinese many hundreds of years ago.
Breeds
Most farm ducks are of a species called "Pekin". It is harder to tell a male from a female with the Pekin ducks because they look almost the same. Pekin ducks have white or cream coloured feathers and orange coloured bills. They do not fly and do well in captivity. They are also excellent for egg and because they look almost the same. Pekin ducks have white or cream coloured feathers and orange coloured bills. They do not fly and do well in captivity. They are also excellent for egg and
What about Kangaroos. They are quite an enigma for most people.
fffffff

Chisinau, Moldova

#97860 Jan 22, 2013
Film critic Steve Schneider calls Jones' version of Daffy "a kind of unleashed id."[5] Jones said that his version of the character "expresses all of the things we're afraid to express."[5] This is evident in Jones' "Duck Amuck" (1953), "one of the few unarguable masterpieces of American animation" according to Schneider.[6] In the episode, Daffy is plagued by a godlike animator whose malicious paintbrush alters the setting, soundtrack, and even Daffy. When Daffy demands to know who is responsible for the changes, the camera pulls back to reveal none other than Bugs Bunny. Duck Amuck is widely heralded as a classic of filmmaking for its illustration that a character's personality can be recognized independently of appearance, setting, voice, and plot.[6] In 1999, the short was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.
[edit] Freleng's DaffyFriz Freleng used the Jones idea for Daffy in "Show Biz Bugs" (1957) wherein Daffy's "trained" pigeon act (they all fly away as soon as Daffy opens their cage) and complicated tap dance number are answered by nothing but crickets chirping in the audience, whereas Bugs's simple song-and-dance numbers bring wild applause.
fffffff

Chisinau, Moldova

#97861 Jan 22, 2013
One of the most popular cartoon characters ever is Daffy Duck. Daffy was the second hit star from the Warner Bros. cartoon shop, appearing two years after Porky Pig. Before Daffy and Porky, Warner Brothers had only hoped to beat the Disney studio in popularity, with the black-and-white Hugh Harman/Rudolph Ising Bosko cartoons of the early 30's, and later the horrible Buddy cartoons.
Bosko had potential, but his creators got a better opportunity to work at the MGM cartoon studio. They took Bosko, a little inkspot character with the characteristics of a little black boy, with them after 3 years at Warners, working for independent producer Leon Schlesinger.
In 1934, the cartoonists remaining, including Friz Freleng, decided to continue the Bosko formula with a white song-and-dance kid named Buddy, one of the most boring characters ever created. These recieve trashing from modern critics, and are among, now, the rarest of all Looney Tunes.
Warner Bros. Goes Looney
This would not last long. Friz Freleng absolutely despised Buddy, and decided to experiment with a group of funny animals, lightly based on the Little Rascals/"Our Gang" scenario. His first film with this idea, "I Haven't Got a Hat", introduced Porky Pig, a shy, stuttering school kid with a passion for patriotic poems and a lack of pants. His classmates, most of which would reappear only on title cards, included a cat named Beans, an owl named Oliver, and "Little Kitty", a sort of female counterpart to Beans. Jack King, Bob Clampett, Friz Freleng, and Tex Avery would continue to work with the Porky and Beans series through 1936, and they had a popular character for the first time in 4 years. These cartoons still, however, showed a Disney influence. Tex Avery, who was not exactly a master at creating Disney-esque cartoons, decided to change things for the better and actually make his cartoons FUNNY. He began, around this time, to cross unusual boundaries with gags in the Porky series, creating a concepts still used in comedy films today, the "everywhere-I-turn -he's there" and "talking-to-the-audience ". He wanted a character so incongruous, so nuts, so out-of place that it would put Walt Disney's cute "Silly Symphonies" to shame. He got one, in the 1937 cartoon "Porky's Duck Hunt."
fffffff

Chisinau, Moldova

#97862 Jan 22, 2013
Along Came Daffy
The elements were finally in place, the hunt (which would become a classic cartoon situation for decades to come), the gags, and the crazy, off-the-wall character, Daffy Duck. If Mickey Mouse was the character that brought animation to the public, it was the team of Porky and Daffy that made it truly funny.
Daffy, although at this point nameless, a little black duck with a white ring around his neck and a twisted twinkle in his eye, turned a black and white cartoon world upside down, woo-hooing and laughing wildly, bouncing on top of his lake like a jumping bean, and fearlessly standing up to the hunter Porky Pig. A person could say that Daffy Duck single-handedly let the looniness into the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies.
Many fans say that the best Daffy Duck cartoons were those of Tex Avery and Bob Clampett in the 1930's, most of which were in black and white. Such cartoons as "Porky's Duck Hunt", "Daffy Duck and Egghead", "Porky and Daffy", "The Daffy Doc", developed Daffy into a sort of wiseguy lunatic who, as he put it in "Daffy Duck and Egghead", "Just don't give a darn!" Bob Clampett's Early Daffy was particularly screwy, and he favored a gigantic mallet (perfect if you want to clobber an innocent pig.)
The voice of Daffy was developed to be a high pitched impersonation of producer Leon Schlesinger, who, apparently, found it to be an extremely funny voice and asked where the animators got it from...he never did get the joke.
Beginning in 1940, Daffy Duck began to develop into the Daffy that theatergoers would know for ten years. In Friz Freleng's "You Oughtta Be In Pictures", Daffy visits the office of a live-action Leon Schlesinger and tries to take Porky Pig's job. Rather symbolic, because after the early 40's, Porky would become little more than a straight man.
on through the 1940's, the crazy black duck starred in over 40 films in setting ranging from the unhappy household ("The Henpecked Duck") to the frozen North ("Daffy's Southern Exposure", "Along Came Daffy") with such costars as Porky Pig, Elmer Fudd, Yosemite Sam, and even Chuck Jones' short-lived character Conrad Cat. His personality changed slightly, from uncontrollable maniac to maniac with brains, who was insane but in control of the situations he found himself in.
fffffff

Chisinau, Moldova

#97863 Jan 22, 2013
Duck Development
In 1948, Daffy Duck would change dramatically, and the start of that change came from Chuck Jones. While Daffy would remain his usual 1940's self in comics through the 1950's, the cartoons would venture into entirely different ideas. Jones began experimenting with Daffy's lust for money in his 1948 cartoons "You Were Never Duckier" and "Daffy Dilly", although he kept the duck more cheerful than he would later become. In "The Scarlet Pumpernickel", Chuck Jones decided to do a picture in which Daffy would try, and fail, to be a swashbuckling hero, ala Errol Flynn movies. His hunger to succeed and failure to do so began to change the character from a hyperactive, carefree, if not patriotic, duck into a more power-hungry and greed-driven loser. Perhaps the principal differences were in design,(Jones made him taller, skinnier, beakier and scruffier-looking) and personality (While he had been a winner before, and happier, Jones made him him a loser who was never satisfied). This is the Daffy Duck we all know today, and the character that would star in some of Chuck Jones' greatest cartoons.Among the best were movie genre spoofs featuring Daffy and Porky, like one in which Daffy tries to be Buck Rogers ("Duck Dodgers in the 241/2 Century") and an attempt at Westerns ("Dripalong Daffy", My Little Duckeroo").
The change didn't take hold with everyone at first. Even into 1952, although he changed over to Jones' design, Robert McKimson used the annoying, crazy-but-sneaky version of Daffy he'd been using before. Friz Freleng was just the opposite, he changed the personality to what Jones was using, his "His Bitter Half" still uses the 1940's design. By the mid 50's, though, Chuck Jones' remodeled Daffy Duck was here to stay.
At first, Daffy remained unsuccessful, but at least happy about it. Jones gave Daffy such foes as Nasty Canasta, Marvin Martian, Elmer Fudd, himself (In the masterpiece of animation, "Duck Amuck") and....Bugs Bunny. In three cartoons, "Rabbit Fire",(1951), "Rabbit Seasoning" (1952) and "Duck Rabit Duck"(1953), Chuck Jones got Daffy mixed up in the Bugs Bunny/Elmer Fudd series, and made "Rabbit Season! Duck Season"! one of the best known arguments in history. The concept of Bugs meeting Daffy was not new, it had been done a as early as the 1940's, in Frank Tashlin's "Porky Pig's Feat", but the characters had no true interaction.
fffffff

Chisinau, Moldova

#97864 Jan 22, 2013
The Nuttiness Continues....
After this period, Jones would change Daffy yet again. Roughly 1954, Daffy's exclusive motivation in life became greed, and in several pairings with Bugs Bunny, he was UNCONTROLLABLY avaricious. He goes wild when he sees a huge treasure in "Ali Baba Bunny", pushing Bugs Bunny and a genie aside to get at it. This has consequences...the duck ends up shrunken by the magical genie, and the film ends with him clutching a tiny pearl before being sealed into an oyster. The period between 1954 and 1957 has been called Daffy's "greedy bastard years", and there is something about these films that makes them only slightly less enjoyable than the earlier ones, although most all are masterpieces.
The Rabbit/Duck teamups would give the other directors at Warner Brothers, at the time Robert McKimson and Friz Freleng, a chance to try out the concept, and Daffy would be paired with Bugs throughout the 50's and early 60's, in competition for everything from movie stardom (Friz Freleng's "A Star is Bored") to game shows (Robert McKimson's "People are Bunny."). In fact, the cartoon that is considered the definitive teamup of Bugs and Daffy, 1957's "Show Biz Bugs",in which each character tries to prove himself better than the other in a vaudeville act, was directed by Freleng. Daffy is still most commonly paired with Bugs today, in marketing, new productions, commercials, nearly every bit of merchandise including Daffy.
Daffy and Speedy
Once Chuck Jones left the studio in the early 60's, it wasn't long before the studio closed down and re-opened again in 1964 as DePatie/Freleng enterprises. Friz Freleng and David H. DePatie produced a whole series of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies through 1967, in which the principal characters were the Road Runner (a new take on the series directed by Rudy Larriva), Speedy Gonzales, and Daffy Duck. It has been speculated that the reason so many of these low-budget, troubled productions paired Speedy with Daffy was that most of the movie-going crowd was now reduced to the southwest,(thanks to television) and the most popular theatrical cartoon characters in that region were Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales. It was not a bad idea to team up the favorites...in theory. They didn't work well for a number of reasons.
For one thing, distributors began paying less and less for cartoons, due to television displacing movies as the more popular entertainment and theaters not being able to afford cartoon shorts. Thus, the post-1964 WB/Depatie-Freleng, and later the Warner Bros./7-Arts cartoons, are quite cheaply produced compared to the cartoons of the 40's and 50's.
Secondly, Robert McKimson, and later Alex Lovy,used the Chuck Jones version of Daffy, but for some reason made him disturbingly bitter. He clearly doesn't like rodents, Speedy just happens to be wherever he goes, and so cartoon plots were written concerning Daffy, for little reason, being mean to or chasing Speedy. These cartoons do have their moments, and many of them are quite good. Such cartoons as "Spy Swatter", "Quacker Tracker", "Feather Finger", "Go Go Amigo", and "Swing Ding Amigo" are among my favorites, a couple of these were directed by Rudy Larriva, the same director of the 1960's Road Runner films. These cartoons do not, in my opinion, deserve the trashing that they get by critics and historians. One thing I will agree on, however, is that the final theatrically-released film for both Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales was "See Ya Later Gladiator", and it has the honor of being possibly the WORST Warner Brothers theatrical cartoon ever made.
fffffff

Chisinau, Moldova

#97865 Jan 22, 2013
Daffy gains new life
Daffy Duck cartoons were a staple on television packages of Looney Tunes cartoons since the 1960 when the Bugs Bunny show first appeared on television. Various incarnations of the Looney Tunes show appeared on network television through the 60's and 70's, there has been a Road Runner Show, a Daffy Duck Show, a Porky Pig show, A Daffy, Sylvester and Speedy Show, and a Bugs Bunny Road Runner hour, to name a few.
In 1980, things began to heat up again for the maladjusted mallard. George Lucas commissioned Chuck Jones to create a sequel to "Duck Dodgers In the 241/2 Century", to be theatrically released withone of his "Star Wars" films. However, when the finished product appeared somebody had second thoughts, and the cartoon found its way into a TV special instead. The 1970's and 1980's TV specials gave the Looney Tunes characters new life, as did several theatrically released movies, all of which were compilations of classic material linked together with new animation.Two of them directly starred Daffy Duck. The first of the Daffy movies,, made in 1983, was, of all things, essentially a new Friz Freleng Daffy/Speedy cartoon with other LT characters making wishes (ala clips from classic Warner cartoons ) into the duo's well as filler material. The second came in 1988, called "Daffy Duck's Quackbusters." This is considered one of the best of the looney compilation movies, using "Daffy Dilly" and the previous years' theatrical shorts "The Duxorcist" and "Night Of the Living Duck" as the major plotline cartoons. These 1987 cartoons were directed by Greg Ford and Terry Lennon, who, for a while at least, kept Looney Tunes alive again. The then- unreleased "Blooper Bunny" and the TV special cartoon "Invasion Of the Bunny Snatchers" both included Daffy, and were , in my opinion, quite good.
Daffy Duck today
The Daffy we see today i generally in merchandise, and most of it uses Chuck Jones' 1950's version. In 1996, Warner Bros. released "Space Jam", a rather strange, but still quite good, fully new computer-animation/live action movie starring Bugs Bunny and Michael Jordan. Daffy actually hearkens back to his crazy 1940's days in the film, even with hints at "The Daffy Doc". The movie also starred almost the entire major cast of Warner Brothers LT cartoons, and even most of the lesser-known supporting players at least appeared in crowd scenes. One memorable gag starred Sniffles the mouse, a character who hadn't see the light of day since 1946. Daffy Duck has since been involved in yet another re-opening and re-closing of the WB cartoon studio, this time called "Chuck Jones Film Productions." Chuck Jones, even in his eighties, was asked by WB to make new theatrical shorts starring the Looney Tunes characters, and beginning with 1994's "Charriots Of Fur", he attempted to do so. This film was good, it was released theatrically with "Richie Rich", and then to a very successful video compilation of Road Runner cartoons by the same title. After this, several other films were made by Jones' studio, but only one starred Daffy Duck,(1997's "Superior Duck") and only three of them recieved theatrical release, one direct-to-video and the rest never formally released. From what those who have seen the whole bunch have said, they are a mixed bag, ranging from very good to very bad. Like many projects, Warner Brothers must have gotten cold feet and stopped publicizing/releasing these films, and by 1997/98 the shop's contract was cancelled and it was shut down for good. Personally, I would love to see all of these films (I've only see one). Makes me very angry if you ask me, WB cancelling this so quickly, but I'm sure they had *SOME* reason for it.
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Hua Hin, Thailand

#97866 Jan 22, 2013
Ahh, memories. Those were the daaayyyyys!
8th Man was my favourite.

“" BITE ME "”

Since: Dec 10

Olney township

#97867 Jan 22, 2013
_0rion_ wrote:
<quoted text>
I wonder if he knows how wrong that remark was?
It just about couldn't be any further from the truth.
Lots of people contribute, many many more share the benefits.
Because his head's so painfully far up his ass,

I'd be shocked, if he makes the bathroom on time... Contemplation is beyond his capacity.

--HE'S

Relegated himself to obscurity.

--AND

Happy blowing bubbles while starring at the wall.

“" BITE ME "”

Since: Dec 10

Olney township

#97868 Jan 22, 2013
Empathica wrote:
<quoted text>
Because his head's so painfully far up his ass,
I'd be shocked, if he makes the bathroom on time... Contemplation is beyond his capacity.
--HE'S
Relegated himself to obscurity.
--AND
Happy blowing bubbles while starring at the wall.
*Staring

Since: Feb 11

Huntingdon, UK

#97869 Jan 22, 2013
Dr Freud wrote:
<quoted text>
Allow me to say that you're attacking your problem from the standpoint that because your constitution doesn't say you have a certain right, that you summarily presume that the right doesn't exist.
That line of thinking is reenforced by those in political office, when they keep declaring that 'you don't have that right,' but they too are most incorrect!
Because YOU think that you don't have the right, and because your politicians WANT you to keep thinking that way, they will repeat the lie endlessly.
The facts are just these: Since YOUR nation's constitution arrives from the British Monarchy's power, and because that selfsame Monarchy's power derives from Magna Carta, and because said Magna Carta PROTECTS the rights of all British Subjects, and Australians by extension, then YOU have THE RIGHT to keep and bear arms, fully protected by Magna Carta, and further by the English Bill of Rights of 1688.
Neither the U.K. Parliament, nor the Monarchy has ever sought to repeal that document. Therefore, that document applies FULLY in the nation of Australia, and remains in FULL FORCE.
If you won't make appeal to that, then you have only yourself to blame.
Reference:
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/aep/WillandMarS...
I am of the opinion that the use of the English language when drafting the Magna Carta, left the document open to goverment interference, abuse, and bastardization.
The framers of the American constitution took this into consideration and used the English language, in such a manner as to leave NO doubht, regarding their intentions, for freedom of the people.
GoGoBar

Hua Hin, Thailand

#97870 Jan 22, 2013
spider1954 wrote:
<quoted text>
I am of the opinion that the use of the English language when drafting the Magna Carta, left the document open to goverment interference, abuse, and bastardization.
The framers of the American constitution took this into consideration and used the English language, in such a manner as to leave NO doubht, regarding their intentions, for freedom of the people.
But why can the blacks have an equal vote and bear arms?
news flash

Coffeyville, KS

#97871 Jan 22, 2013
Because all men are equal....duh.
GoGoBar

Hua Hin, Thailand

#97872 Jan 22, 2013
news flash wrote:
Because all men are equal....duh.
It must have been lost in translation for 90 years eh?

What were the other doubtfull things.
Currency, gold, banking, standing armies etc... How vague could 18th Century English be. But they werent Shaekespear I suppose. Mostly Aristrocratic land owning slavers with a hatred of taxes.

The USA began after the civil war. No DOUBT about that!
GoGoBar

Hua Hin, Thailand

#97873 Jan 22, 2013
Mass shootings..it is the guns. The same all over the developed world.

“" BITE ME "”

Since: Dec 10

Olney township

#97874 Jan 22, 2013
spider1954 wrote:
<quoted text>
I am of the opinion that the use of the English language when drafting the Magna Carta, left the document open to goverment interference, abuse, and bastardization.
The framers of the American constitution took this into consideration and used the English language, in such a manner as to leave NO doubht, regarding their intentions, for freedom of the people.
This country has grown geometrically in size, population and richness of culture and ethnicity.

Our framers couldn't possibly have taken this into account.

To believe otherwise is to ponder, dwell and thus, confine yourself to the realm of absolutes.

Since: Feb 11

Huntingdon, UK

#97876 Jan 22, 2013
Guppy wrote:
old troll
Is that an abreviation for trollop ?
Guns yes people no

East Quogue, NY

#97877 Jan 22, 2013
I like Meat fresh kill is the best

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