It's the Guns, Stupid

It's the Guns, Stupid

There are 103299 comments on the Truthdig story from Apr 20, 2007, titled It's the Guns, Stupid. In it, Truthdig reports that:

“And that's the end of the issue”

Why do we have the same futile argument every time there is a mass killing? Advocates of gun control try to open a discussion about whether more reasonable weapons statutes might reduce the number of violent ... via Truthdig

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Truthdig.

“Topix is lowlife scum with no”

Since: Jun 12

respect for anyone...

#97762 Jan 21, 2013
Dr Freud wrote:
<quoted text>
The 'founder' of Linux (Linus Benedict Torvalds) was given to remark that THAT particular iteration of Unix was the most effective expression of communism, because everybody contributed, but nobody benefited.
I wonder if he knows how wrong that remark was?
It just about couldn't be any further from the truth.
Lots of people contribute, many many more share the benefits.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97763 Jan 21, 2013
Publications on Ducks and Related Publications
• DISEASES OF POULTRY, 2003. Ames: Iowa State Press, 2003. 11th ed./ editor-in-chief, Y.M. Saif , DVM, PhD, Professor and Head, Department of Food Animal Health Research Program, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH.

Associate editors:

A.M. Fadly, DVM, PhD, Dipl ACPV, Research Leader and Laboratory Director, USDA-ARS Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory, East Lansing, MI.

J.R. Glisson, DVM, MAM, PhD, Professor and Head, Department of Population Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA.

L.R. McDougald, PhD, Professor, Department of Poultry Science, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA.

L.K. Nolan, DVM, PhD, Professor and Chair, Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA.

D.E. Swayne, DVM, PhD, DACVP, DACPV, Laboratory Director, USDA-ARS Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory, Athens, GA.
• NUTRITION AND MANAGEMENT OF DUCKS, 1991. M. L. Scott and W.F. Dean. Published by: M. L. Scott of Ithaca, Publisher, P.O. Box 4464, Ithaca, NY 14852 (orders may be sent to this address, the book was reprinted 1999 in softcover, price:$24.00).

•DUCK PRODUCTION, SCIENCE AND WORLD PRACTICE, 1985. Edited by D. J. Farrell and P. Stapleton. Published by University of New England, Armidale, Australia.

•NUTRITION OF THE CHICKEN, 1982. M. L. Scott, M. C. Nesheim and R. J. Young. Published by: M. L. Scott & Associates, Publishers, P.O. Box 4464, Ithaca, NY 14852 (Contains basic poultry nutrition applicable to ducks).

•POULTRY PRODUCTION, 1979. M. C. Nesheim, R. E. Austic and L. E. Card. Published by: Lea & Febiger, Philadelphia (This is a basic poultry textbook with much information applicable to ducks).

•NUTRIENT REQUIREMENTS OF POULTRY, 1994. National Research Council. Published by:National Academy Press, 2101 constitution Avenue, Washington, D.C. 20418 (Includes section on nutrient requirements of ducks).

•GUIDE FOR THE CARE AND USE OF AGRICULTURAL ANIMALS IN AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND TEACHING, 1999. Published by: Federation of Animal Science Societies, 1111 North Dunlap Avenue, Savoy, IL 61874 (Includes section on the care of ducks).

•WATERFOWL PRODUCTION, PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON WATERFOWL PRODUCTION, THE SATELLITE CONFERENCE FOR THE XVII WORLD'S POULTRY CONGRESS, 1988. International Academic Publishers, Xizhimenwai Dajie, Beijing Exhibition Centre, Beijing 100044, China, Distributed outside PRC by Pergamon Press, Headington Hill Hall, Oxford OX3 OBW, U.K.(New York, Frankfort, Sao Paulo, Sydney, Tokyo, Toronto).

•PROCEEDINGS 11th EUROPEAN SYMPOSIUM ON WATERFOWL, Nantes, France, 1997. Published by: Association Groupe Francais de la WPSA (French Branch), NISBN: 2-9507884-3-2.

•PROCEEDINGS 1st WORLD WATERFOWL CONFERENCE, TAIWAN, R.O.C. 1999. Dec 1-4 1999, Taichung, Taiwan. Sponsored by Taiwan Livestock Institute, National Chung-Hsing University, Worlds Poultry Science Assoc.

•PROCEEDINGS 3rd WORLD WATERFOWL CONFERENCE, Guangzhou, China, November 3- 6, 2005. Organized under the Worlds Poultry Science Association, China Branch of WPSA, South China Agricultural University.

•EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT IN THE EGGS OF THE PEKIN DUCK, R.S. Kartofen, 1971. Centre for Agricultural Publishing and Documentation, Wageningen, Netherlands.

•POULTRY LIGHTING. Lewis, P. and T. Morris, 2006. Northcot, Cowdown Lane, Goodworth Clatford, Andover, Hampshire SP11 7HG, United Kingdom.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97764 Jan 21, 2013
MPs' expenses: so just what is a duck house?
A five foot tall floating duck house claimed from the public purse by Tory grandee Sir Peter Viggers has become one of the most bizarre items so far uncovered in the MPs’ expenses investigation.

The £1,645 pond feature, modelled on an 18th century Swedish building by a firm selling elaborate garden follies, sits in the pond at the Gosport MP’s Hampshire home.

News of the bizarre expenses claim which follows submissions for jellied eels, fluffy dusters and horse manure, will perplex millions of homeowners unfamiliar with the apparently essential role of duck houses in protecting wildfowl from foxes and other predators.

Wildlife using such a mini folly is protected from garden predators such as foxes by the small expanse of pond water. Among the design features is a removable wing that can be slid out or a roof that can be lifted to collect eggs or to do housekeeping.

Sir Peter's garden purchase has been endorsed by television property guru Kirstie Allsopp in a message on Twitter. In response to the Daily Telegraph revelation she wrote: "Wow...floating duck islands are a winner, they protect ducks from Foxes, does this mean we can all have one now?"

The ‘Stockholm’ design is modelled on an 18th-century building at Skansen, Stockholm's museum of buildings.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97765 Jan 21, 2013
Peking Duck is a famous duck dish from Beijing[1] that has been prepared since the imperial era, and is now considered a national dish of China.
The dish is prized for the thin, crisp skin, with authentic versions of the dish serving mostly the skin and little meat, sliced in front of the diners by the cook. Ducks bred specially for the dish are slaughtered after 65 days and seasoned before being roasted in a closed or hung oven. The meat is eaten with pancakes, scallion, and hoisin sauce or sweet bean sauce. The two most notable restaurants in Beijing which serve this delicacy are Quanjude and Bianyifang, two centuries-old establishments which have become household names.
Duck has been roasted in China since the Southern and Northern Dynasties.[2] A variation of roast duck was prepared for the Emperor of China in the Yuan Dynasty. The dish, originally named "Shaoyazi" (&#29138;&#40232;& #23376;), was mentioned in the Complete Recipes for Dishes and Beverages (&#39154;&#33203;& #27491;&#35201;) manual in 1330 by Hu Sihui (&#24573;&#24605;& #24935;), an inspector of the imperial kitchen.[3][4] The Peking Roast Duck that came to be associated with the term was fully developed during the later Ming Dynasty,[2][5][6] and by then, Peking Duck was one of the main dishes on imperial court menus.[7] The first restaurant specialising in Peking Duck, Bianyifang, was established in the Xianyukou, Qianmen area of Beijing in 1416.[8]
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97766 Jan 21, 2013
Most Australian coastal streams, lagoons, mountain lakes and inland swamps have their quota of Pacific Black Ducks as they are one of our most widely spread and abundant ducks. They can be found in any wet/water habitat and often mix and feed with native Grey Ducks and Chestnut Teal Ducks. Found throughout Australia, except inland deserts, mainly where fresh water is present but sometimes salt water, they are randomly nomadic following floods but will be rather more sedentary on permanent waters especially on eastern and northern coastal areas and part of this can be attributed to human feeding. In southeastern Australia seasonal shifts in populations, north over winter and south in spring and summer. Across northern Australia the birds stay on coastal waters during winter-spring dry season and then disperse inland with the summer monsoons.

The introduced Mallard presents a particular danger to the Pacific Black Duck as they have similar food and habitat needs and so complete for survival. When these two species interbreed the feral Mallard strain is dominant and in successive generations the characteristics of our native Pacific Black can be lost. In addition the Mallard imparts unfavourable traits to these hybrids such as that they are sedentary birds and not able to survive the erratic (and ever more so) climate of Australia and so do not adapt as pure native duck species, which are nomadic especially in times of drought.

Both adults are fully water proof using the oil excreted from the preening gland at the base of their tail. They have same plumage except that all the colours are paler on the female. Their most distinct feature is their dusty-brown head with cream face and brown stripe that runs from top of bill thru brown-red eye with a second smaller brown stripe that runs from side of mouth along cheek. Back, tail dusty-brown with feathers edged in cream, throat cream, breast, belly and under tail all brown with cream buff edges, flight feathers brown, secondary feathers broad green spectrum edged in black, under wing white and used to signal to other ducks in courtship displays, bill olive-grey with black nostrils, webbed feet olive-grey with 3 toes forward and one very small toe backward. Ducklings - top of head, neck and back dusky down, yellow face with black lines thru eyes and cheek, under parts yellow, yellow spots on sides of back and rear edge of wing, bill and webb feet dark olive-green. Ducklings are not born water proofed and can die easily if left wet or cold from pneumonia. They also do not like to be brought up alone and in care are always buddied up with another duckling or a baby chicken, so consider this if you are thinking of getting one (get two!).
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97767 Jan 21, 2013
The female has a loud raucous quack, single or repeated slowly or quickly when distressed. Male has a softer quack and a whistle during courtship displays.

Breeding season is timed to occur when water areas are at their fullest and aquatic plants mature. In southern Australia this takes place in spring following winter rains, in the north birds breed in autumn after summer rains. If the rainfall is erratic they will breed when the rivers are at their peak, if living in an area of abundant rain through the year then they will breed all year round. They form seasonal pairs before breeding time starts with a series of postures including flapping of wings and pretending to mate. Nests range from scrapes in the ground to well-woven cups in grass or reeds also holes in trees stumps, in deserted nests of other water birds or flat surfaces in staghorns and large low ferns. The female plucks soft small feathers from her breast to line the nest area and also to cover the 7-13 eggs when she leaves to go off and feed accompanied by the male. Eggs are oval with a smooth glossy white shell and the female incubates them for 26-30 days. Ducklings are semi- precocial – hatched with eyes open, covered with down, capable of walking/swimming soon after hatching but stay with the parents near the nest.

They feed in the water by diving, dabbling and grazing using their wide bill, their tongues work like pistons so water is sucked in at the trips of their bills and then pushed out again past filter-plates at the sides and the rear. Their natural food consists of both plant and animal food from the water as well as aquatic plant seeds, insects, yabbies, shrimps and crustaceans. Ducklings feed mainly on aquatic insects.

Important Information

Thousands of our beautiful water birds die each year of Botulism, which is a bacterial infection affecting the nervous system, from still, dirty or oxygen-deficient water. They get sick and die a slow death from ingesting foul water, decaying vegetable or animal matter containing the neurotoxin produced by the bacteria. Tell authorities as soon as possible if the water in rivers, dams, lakes or ponds is not clean and fresh, if there is garbage, plastic or sewer in the water or if there is an abundance of weed or algae. You could be saving their life.

Being so abundant through our great land this lovely duck is the most popular shot game bird and in coastal districts makes up over 70% of other killed. It may be able to survive some of the controlled hunting but coupled with its ever dwindling habitat, feral and domestic animals, drought, fire, roads and disease it cannot maintain its numbers.

Once again we find a native bird being constantly feed by humans which upsets their balance of breeding, growth and health. Bread, biscuits, cake or any processed foods are of no nutritional value to these birds or any other native bird or animal. If you have ducks in your garden, park, school or any other area enjoy them naturally. Inform and educate people to the damage feeding is to these beautiful creatures, they are feeding them because they care. If you must supplement their diet then lettuce, spinach, alfalfa sprouts, budgie/canary seeds, milk thistle, worms, insects are all good foods.

Images by Iris Bergmann & Melanie Barsony

“Topix is lowlife scum with no”

Since: Jun 12

respect for anyone...

#97768 Jan 21, 2013
GoGoBar wrote:
<quoted text>
AAAARRRRRGGGGGHHH! Just as I suspected. You have never been to a Parent and Teachers meeting. Trust me, I have. YOU would be peeing your pants after 3 seconds with your RANT about gun culture.
You could quote Wayne LaPisspantierre about video culture.
You could show them your HARMLESS gun if the law allowed it.
You are a pimple faced boy with no real knowledge of the world.
Sue me!
Sigh...another amature internet shrink who thinks they know everything but doesn't have a clue.

I don't rant about owning guns.
You obviously have no idea about Australian culture nowdays.
Thanks to all the hype & media brainwashing etc. most Australians automatically assume anyone who owns a gun is a criminal.
If they don't think gun owners are criminals they come out with garbage like "oh you don't need them anyway", when the truth is they don't have a f*cking clue whether someone needs a gun or not.

Seeing as you're not capable of intelligent conversation I'll leave you to waffle on in your own ignorance.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97769 Jan 21, 2013
Most Australian coastal streams, lagoons, mountain lakes and inland swamps have their quota of Pacific Black Ducks as they are one of our most widely spread and abundant ducks. They can be found in any wet/water habitat and often mix and feed with native Grey Ducks and Chestnut Teal Ducks. Found throughout Australia, except inland deserts, mainly where fresh water is present but sometimes salt water, they are randomly nomadic following floods but will be rather more sedentary on permanent waters especially on eastern and northern coastal areas and part of this can be attributed to human feeding. In southeastern Australia seasonal shifts in populations, north over winter and south in spring and summer. Across northern Australia the birds stay on coastal waters during winter-spring dry season and then disperse inland with the summer monsoons.

The introduced Mallard presents a particular danger to the Pacific Black Duck as they have similar food and habitat needs and so complete for survival. When these two species interbreed the feral Mallard strain is dominant and in successive generations the characteristics of our native Pacific Black can be lost. In addition the Mallard imparts unfavourable traits to these hybrids such as that they are sedentary birds and not able to survive the erratic (and ever more so) climate of Australia and so do not adapt as pure native duck species, which are nomadic especially in times of drought.

Both adults are fully water proof using the oil excreted from the preening gland at the base of their tail. They have same plumage except that all the colours are paler on the female. Their most distinct feature is their dusty-brown head with cream face and brown stripe that runs from top of bill thru brown-red eye with a second smaller brown stripe that runs from side of mouth along cheek. Back, tail dusty-brown with feathers edged in cream, throat cream, breast, belly and under tail all brown with cream buff edges, flight feathers brown, secondary feathers broad green spectrum edged in black, under wing white and used to signal to other ducks in courtship displays, bill olive-grey with black nostrils, webbed feet olive-grey with 3 toes forward and one very small toe backward. Ducklings - top of head, neck and back dusky down, yellow face with black lines thru eyes and cheek, under parts yellow, yellow spots on sides of back and rear edge of wing, bill and webb feet dark olive-green. Ducklings are not born water proofed and can die easily if left wet or cold from pneumonia. They also do not like to be brought up alone and in care are always buddied up with another duckling or a baby chicken, so consider this if you are thinking of getting one (get two!).

The female has a loud raucous quack, single or repeated slowly or quickly when distressed. Male has a softer quack and a whistle during courtship displays

“shirley you cant be serious ”

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#97770 Jan 21, 2013
this Boo is a real quackpot

“shirley you cant be serious ”

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#97771 Jan 21, 2013
boo is quackers

“Topix is lowlife scum with no”

Since: Jun 12

respect for anyone...

#97772 Jan 21, 2013
Ahomana wrote:
Why does Donald Duck wear a towel when he comes out of the shower, when he doesn't usually wear any pants?
Could this be Boo...a low IQ duck famer/hunter.....WARNING....th is could be distressing for animal lovers...Hunters are right!
http://news.sky.com/story/835388/exclusive-fa...
Hunters don't do that.
Hunters just shoot them.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97773 Jan 21, 2013
The following information provides some tips about how to deter ducks and other birds from pools:

•Change the landscape to make it less attractive to the birds


Geese and ducks are attracted to areas with open water and large expanses of grass, such as golf courses, parks, and large lawns. Eliminate or break-up some of the large expanses of lawn by planting shrubs and other visual barriers.

Water birds generally don't like tall grass, because they can't see predators well. Letting vegetation grow taller and keeping native vegetation along pool edges can assist. Consider alternatives to short turf grasses and try planting trees and shrubs in the flight path between the pond, pool and lawns.

•Keep swimming pools covered (when not in use) to discourage geese and ducks from landing in them.

•Install barriers. Waterfowl prefer to land on water and walk onto adjacent grassy areas to feed and rest. The most effective tools for controlling waterfowl movement are fences, hedgerows, and other physical barriers.

•Consider fencing the pool/yard.

•Avoid feeding geese and ducks and try to remove any food scraps that may attract the birds. Many types of ducks and geese are grazers and eat short grass (allow grass to grow longer so it is unpalatable to the birds) and reducing the area of grass lawns around the swimming pool or putting up barriers that prohibit movement between swimming pools and grass lawns, such as fences and hedges, might also help.

•Remove plants that produce edible nuts, fruits, and berries. Remove any bird feeders that may be in the area.

•Trim or remove trees and shrubs to limit branches hanging around or over the pool that can be used by roosting birds.

•Scarecrows with movable parts, fake plastic snakes and even plastic or ceramic dogs will often keep waterfowl away. These work best if moved around the yard every few days so that they are not always in the same place.

•Waterfowl prefer nesting on islands, peninsulas, and undisturbed grounds. When landscaping, avoid creating small islands or peninsulas; where these features already exist, consider changes to make them unavailable to waterfowl.

•Having a real and socialised dog present may also discourage ducks and geese from using the area
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97774 Jan 21, 2013
There's no denying that baby ducklings are irresistible for the first 2 weeks. They quickly lose their "cute and fuzzy look" as they prepare to get their first feathers. For the next 4 weeks they eat, poop, cheep and sleep. The mess, the work, the noise and the smell can be overwhelming to most people. Ducklings outgrow their cage or box at about 2-3 weeks of age and their care becomes increasingly difficult for the inexperienced exotic pet owner. This is when most are taken to shelters or dumped into local waterways.
A duckling for Easter? By summer you will have a full grown duck
Ducks require a commitment for many years. They can live 10 to 15 years, sometimes longer. Once a duck "imprints" on humans, releasing them into the wild, for example a local pond, waterway, golf course... is a death sentence.
A duck is not a novelty or a toy you can set aside when you're done playing with it
Ducks sold in pet stores, domestic ducks, are not physically or instinctively equipped to live in the wild. Domestic ducks have been bred in captivity on farms for hundreds of years. Because they are bred mostly as a food source, they have unusually heavy bodies, weak legs and when introduced to any human environment they become prone to injury.
Unlike their wild duck cousins most breeds of domestic ducks are flightless and cannot fly to escape danger. They cannot migrate when naturally existing food sources seasonally disappear. They don't have the natural instincts required to live on wild food sources and will endanger themselves, crossing busy streets to find humans who will give them food. And the ones that survive will probably find a human to feed them, creating another problem.
Well-meaning human interference, especially feeding creates multiple problems for the domestic "dumped" ducks and wild ducks alike. Most people simply do not understand the implications of feeding wildlife. Too often they feed ducks bread and crackers causing severe malnutrition and other health problems. "People food" can shorten a duck's lifespan by more than 90%! Food that humans leave for ducks that doesn't get eaten also attracts animals and insects that carry contagious disease. The health risks are enormous for the ducks and for the people who are feeding them, especially children.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97775 Jan 21, 2013
Ducks as Pets
Pet ducks will entertain you with their antics and eat pesky slugs and snails. A female will produce abundant eggs.

To look after ducklings all you need is a large cardboard box, some shavings or straw, a heat lamp, a feeder and a waterer. As they grow, they will need more space and less heat. Keep an eye on the birds; if they stay away from the heat, turn it off, if they get their pen messy quickly, they need more bedding and more space. By 5 or 6 weeks they can probably be outside all the time in good weather.

Ducks need a deep enough water bowl so they can dip their heads in water 2 or 3 times a day. They need to wash their eyes otherwise they can get dry eyes and cataracts.

A single pet duck can make a great pet but you should make sure you have enough time to devote to your duck. Make sure you get your duck very young or incubate the egg yourself and be the first thing he or she sees when it hatches. You will need to spend a lot of time bonding with your duck so that you and your family become the duck's flock. So you’ll need to devote yourself to playing and just being with your duck everyday, on top of the usual cleaning and feeding duties.

Ducks are social animals and will suffer if they don't have companionship. So if you can't make this commitment for the full 12 or so years a duck can live, you should get two or more ducks
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97776 Jan 21, 2013
If they've been raised alone, they tend to think that they are part of whatever flock they're around. Sometimes they'll believe that they're human, a chicken or even a dog. They're just plain quackers!

Duck Facts

A male duck is called a drake, a female is called a duck. Babies are called ducklings.
Ducks are related to geese and swans. The duck is the smallest of them all and have shorter necks and wings and a stout body.
Ducks can live from 2-12 years, depending on the species.Ducks have webbed feet, which act like paddles. A duck waddles instead of walking because of its webbed feet.
Ducks' feet have no nerves or blood vessels. This means ducks never feel the cold, even if they swim in icy cold water.
Ducks provide us with eggs, meat and feathers.
Ducks' feathers are waterproof. There is a special gland that produces oil near the tail that spreads and covers the outer coat of feathers. Beneath this waterproof layer are fluffy and soft feathers to keep the duck warm.
Ducks keep clean by preening themselves with their beaks, which they do often. They also line their nests with feathers plucked from their chest.
Ducks were once wild until they were domesticated by the Chinese many hundreds of years ago.

Breeds

Most farm ducks are of a species called "Pekin". It is harder to tell a male from a female with the Pekin ducks because they look almost the same. Pekin ducks have white or cream coloured feathers and orange coloured bills. They do not fly and do well in captivity. They are also excellent for egg and meat production.

Ducks as Pets

Pet ducks will entertain you with their antics and eat pesky slugs and snails. A female will produce abundant eggs.

To look after ducklings all you need is a large cardboard box, some shavings or straw, a heat lamp, a feeder and a waterer. As they grow, they will need more space and less heat. Keep an eye on the birds; if they stay away from the heat, turn it off, if they get their pen messy quickly, they need more bedding and more space. By 5 or 6 weeks they can probably be outside all the time in good weather.

Ducks need a deep enough water bowl so they can dip their heads in water 2 or 3 times a day. They need to wash their eyes otherwise they can get dry eyes and cataracts.

A single pet duck can make a great pet but you should make sure you have enough time to devote to your duck. Make sure you get your duck very young or incubate the egg yourself and be the first thing he or she sees when it hatches. You will need to spend a lot of time bonding with your duck so that you and your family become the duck's flock. So you'll need to devote yourself to playing and just being with your duck everyday, on top of the usual cleaning and feeding duties.

Ducks are social animals and will suffer if they don't have companionship. So if you can't make this commitment for the full 12 or so years a duck can live, you should get two or more ducks.

Since: Dec 10

Brisbane, Australia

#97777 Jan 21, 2013
The ADELAIDEAN wrote:
<quoted text>
Such cruelty! And guess what ... not a gun anywhere!!:)
Bit of a shame, I could use one about now.:)
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97778 Jan 21, 2013
TO HAVE DUCKS IN YOUR POND OR NOT!

FOR

1. Wood ducks and Mandarins are the most beautiful of all of the smaller ducks.
2. Ducks diet includes plants and string algae - they can clean the worst kind of algae from a pond. While I would not choose to introduce ducks into a pond for this reason alone, string algae would be a major factor in the decision.

3. Ducks can become wonderful pets and are fun to watch. As shown above, our ducks use their diving board throughout the day.

4. They make a wonderful wildlife addition to a backyard nature conservatory. People are amazed to see "wild ducks" in a city backyard environment.

5. Wood ducks and Mandarins seem to develop personalities and traits of the own, which increases the enjoyment of your pond and back yard.

6. Ducks love to eat slugs, bugs, and even pull weeds - I have yet to find a desirable plant of ours that they eat!

7. Wood Ducks and Mandarins are very quiet, making very muted sounds which neighbors never hear.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97779 Jan 21, 2013
Against

1. Ducks, like any animal do create waste products that will land on your pond sides and in the water - Roughly equivalent to several large koi. Easily hosed off.
2. Ducks eat plants and can go through quite a few water hyacinths and water lilies in a season. Don't expect to keep ducks and beautiful water lilies together.

3. Ducks will eat or kill small koi (fish 4-5 inches in length would be in danger).

4. Ducks could become easy prey to cats, hunting dogs, hawks and eagles. The same protection recommended for your pond (a locked 6 ft fence) will also protect your ducks against the dogs and human predators.

5. Ducks may require winter protection in extreme northern climates. They need a source of water year round.

6. Wood ducks may require a federal or state permit to own or ship across state lines. The permits are usually easy to acquire and more often than not a formality.

7. Discourage wild ducks from entering your pond and bringing in parasites and disease.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97780 Jan 21, 2013
First of all, please understand that we are talking about tame or captured ducks only. Wild ducks should be discouraged from using your pond due to the possibility of their bringing in parasites and possibly diseases to attack your fish. Your own ducks will be remaining in your own pond and not contributing to it's disease.

One person's story
A year ago my wife remembered seeing a pair of wood ducks at a koi pond during a pond tour. The pair had some baby ducks which she had thought were cute and was wondering if they were practical to have a pair in our pond.

I researched the subject and learned where I could purchase a pair of wood ducks and mandarin ducks. I also discovered that ducks must be pinioned (wings clipped at the joint to prevent flight) to prevent their flight into other yards and for their protection. Please note that while some consider this cruel, if done while chicks, they do not suffer, and they recover nicely. I ordered them for delivery for my wife's birthday present. I couldn't keep it a secret due to the logistics of delivery and preparations. She was excited beyond belief at this unusual birthday gift. They were shipped and delivered with no problems. My wife has been ecstatic ever since and still counts this as possible her best (and certainly the most unique) present ever!

As you can see in the pictures above, our pairs of wood ducks (Winnie and Woody) and our pair of mandarin ducks (Mandy and Max) have adapted well to our back yard pond and wooded area nicely. I built them a diving board to extend out from our small deck and over the pond. It was an immediate success! The ducks were diving off the board that afternoon and use it all day long.

Our 9,000 gallon pond and half acre lot seems adequate for 4 ducks, but I don't think that I would recommend that someone start out with two pair at first. It would probably be best to acquire one pair to make certain that you have the space and a bio-filter system with the extra capacity, the add another pair if desired.

Whenever I talk about ducks, I have talked about pairs because it seemed the only way to have them. It seems that it may be cruel to have a single duck and therefore I have limited our discussion to pairs. I am sure that some will want a single duck and in that event I would recommend a male for their brilliant colors.
boo

Moscow, Russia

#97781 Jan 21, 2013
Requirements
While ducks can be raised with small tubs of water, a large pond will allow them to really show off. Our ducks often dive under the water, only to pop up 10 to 15 feet away. If possible, make your pond 3-4 ft deep so they can dive. A small island, dirt or floating platform will provide protection against predators if they are nearby. Even though they can't fly, they will often begin flapping their wings and skim across the water in the appearance of flying low over the pond. They obviously enjoy their "flights" and will do this several times a day for exercise.

Water cleanliness is important, so you must have a way of flushing dirty water and waste from the pond periodically. A drain, overflow, etc. with nearby hose will make the job simple.

Ducks will require cracked corn or scratch (a mix of cracked corn and various grains), plants or vegetables such as water hyacinths, water lilies, lettuce, etc. They will require water near their food, and a place such as a pond to swim. They love to climb onto rocks or boulders, dog houses, or any high object (in the wild, they live in trees).

Cover or a wind break may be necessary during the cold winter months as protection from bitter cold winds. If you live in the north, a dog house or other small shelter may be necessary for protection against cold, bitter, northern winds in the coldest part of the winter

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Australia Discussions

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Why do white and Chinese guys have smaller d!ck... (Sep '13) 2 hr DravidianPower 14
News Muslim cleric tells Australians: 'Husbands shou... (Jan '09) 11 hr Vivek Golikeri 64
Dear Australia Sun poopoo 4
Targeted Individuals (gangstalking) and the Rh ... (Sep '14) Feb 18 Greg NKC 40
Where to get Quality Weed / Hashish & Meds in P... Feb 17 Jay 1
How to get Quality Weed / Hashes & Meds in Melb... Feb 17 Bunny 2
News UPDATED: Relief as couple rescued Feb 17 Aussie Bob 1
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