Drugs – Finally Some common Sense
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Punchbowl LEBBO

Sydney, Australia

#228 Apr 10, 2012
sairla wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes
Come to Lebanon all cucumber grow very wild hahahha
JJJ

Surry Hills, Australia

#229 Apr 10, 2012
Some good comments..... as one has said, no one is saying that cannabis does not have its dangers, but if the governments allow the smoking of tobacco and the sale of intoxicating alcohol AND taxes them to the max.....

Then surely it is hypocritical to outlaw cannabis and waste so much money and other resources trying to police it.

All the social and health problems caused by cannabis are already a fact of life and for those that need to be told NO THIS DOES NOT MEAN ACCEPTING THINGS LIKE CHILD ABUSE OR FEMALE GENITAL MUTILASTION, SLAVERY, MURDER OR ANY SUCH INSANITY ON THE PART OF HUMANS BECAUSE THEY ARE A FACT OF LIFE.

By taxing cannabis in the same way as alcohol and tobacco are taxed these problems could be addressed in a more meaningful way.

The Netherlands have had MJ legalised for many years and still function as a nation.

Portugal treat all drug use, at the user level as an illness at best rather than a crime.

As parents would hope that our children can lead drug free lives, and that includes tobacco and alcohol but as we their role models have demonstrated.....

It is indeed the rare individual that is completely drug free..... as such if our teen age children do choose to experiment where would you prefer them to get their alcohol, cigarettes or MJ?

From an irrisponsible adult willing to obtain or give it to them?

Or their alcohol from bootleggers and Mj from drug dealers who not only are already criminals but who invariably will introduce kids to other drugs before they would choose to themselves?

Anyway.... if nothing more only good can come from the fact it is being discussed.

Since: Jan 12

Where The Wild Things Grow

#230 Apr 11, 2012
JJJ wrote:
Some good comments..... as one has said, no one is saying that cannabis does not have its dangers, but if the governments allow the smoking of tobacco and the sale of intoxicating alcohol AND taxes them to the max.....
Then surely it is hypocritical to outlaw cannabis and waste so much money and other resources trying to police it.
All the social and health problems caused by cannabis are already a fact of life and for those that need to be told NO THIS DOES NOT MEAN ACCEPTING THINGS LIKE CHILD ABUSE OR FEMALE GENITAL MUTILASTION, SLAVERY, MURDER OR ANY SUCH INSANITY ON THE PART OF HUMANS BECAUSE THEY ARE A FACT OF LIFE.
By taxing cannabis in the same way as alcohol and tobacco are taxed these problems could be addressed in a more meaningful way.
The Netherlands have had MJ legalised for many years and still function as a nation.
Portugal treat all drug use, at the user level as an illness at best rather than a crime.
As parents would hope that our children can lead drug free lives, and that includes tobacco and alcohol but as we their role models have demonstrated.....
It is indeed the rare individual that is completely drug free..... as such if our teen age children do choose to experiment where would you prefer them to get their alcohol, cigarettes or MJ?
From an irrisponsible adult willing to obtain or give it to them?
Or their alcohol from bootleggers and Mj from drug dealers who not only are already criminals but who invariably will introduce kids to other drugs before they would choose to themselves?
Anyway.... if nothing more only good can come from the fact it is being discussed.
That is right, in obtaining illegal drugs young people are exposed to other risks, quite possibly far greater than that associated with the drug they are obtaining. I believe adults are in a position to make choices and accept consequences but children must be protected, changes to legislation may offer these children some form of protection which is not available currently.
MALBARCACA Controller

London, UK

#231 Apr 11, 2012
sairla wrote:
<quoted text>
That is right, in obtaining illegal drugs young people are exposed to other risks, quite possibly far greater than that associated with the drug they are obtaining. I believe adults are in a position to make choices and accept consequences but children must be protected, changes to legislation may offer these children some form of protection which is not available currently.
The notion of common sense to some is just perplexing. And the choices they make beyond belief.

The consequences well they just have to learn to accept them.

Since: Jan 12

Where The Wild Things Grow

#232 Apr 11, 2012
MALBARCACA Controller wrote:
<quoted text>
The notion of common sense to some is just perplexing. And the choices they make beyond belief.
The consequences well they just have to learn to accept them.
:P

“We don't have to take it”

Since: Jun 08

WhereTFamI?

#234 Apr 17, 2012
hmmmmmm..... obsessed roid user... from Melbourne too...

Bodybuilder imported steroids:

AAP
April 17, 2012

A MELBOURNE man who became obsessed with body building has been given a two-year suspended jail term for importing steroids from China.

Brenton Philip Dowell, 25, was sentenced today in the Victorian County Court after pleading guilty to three charges of importing anabolic steroids and two charges of possessing steroids.

The court heard Dowell imported more than $11,000 worth of steroids, which were mailed to him from China on three occasions in 2010.

Judge Graeme Hicks said Dowell had intended to use the steroids for his own body building as well as to sell to friends and acquaintances to recover his expenses in a "misguided way of trying to improve your body".

"As a result of being bullied and being overweight, you'd decided to take up body building," Judge Hicks said.

"As your counsel submitted, it would be fair to say that you became somewhat obsessed by such an activity."

But he said that while Dowell was still a bodybuilder, he no longer used steroids, was genuinely remorseful and had good prospects of rehabilitation.

He sentenced Dowell to two years jail time, wholly suspended on conditions of good behaviour for two years, and fined him $10,000.

Read more: http://www.news.com.au/breaking-news/bodybuil...

“"Helloooowww"”

Since: Feb 12

Sydney

#235 Apr 21, 2012
JJJ wrote:
I see in the news that Bob Carr is calling for a debate on the decriminalisation for drug use particularly marijuana which he calls a ‘victimless’ crime.
From the outset I wish to say that I do not advocate the use of drugs of any kind but I believe that if as a species we practiced acceptance of things that fate accompli instead of wasting our energy and resources on denial we would solve many of our social problems that we have to deal with.
I applaud Bob Carr for bringing this issue into the light of day because it is about time we accept that drug use is here to stay and so it is in everyone’s interest that we manage the issue in the most intelligent and cost affective way possible.
Over the years billions and billions of our tax dollars have been wasted fighting a ‘war on drugs’ when the truth is the war was lost decades ago.
There can be no argument against the legalisation of at least marijuana.
Granted the criticisms that the anti drug faction make against this happening are all warranted and true. But the point that we all seem to be ignoring is that these negative criticisms stemming from drug use are already a fact of everyday life and legalising marijuana won’t change a single thing in this regard.
As to the argument that marijuana use will increase if it is legalised…. this is simply not true. I challenge anyone who disagrees with me to do the following:
Anytime this subject arises in conversation to carry out your own poll and ask all the people that you interact with who you know do NOT use marijuana this question:
Would you begin to use marijuana if it was legalised?
My profession enables me to interact with a wide range of people and whenever the subject of marijuana use pops up I have asked this question and I have only ever had one person answer that he would begin to use marijuana if it was legalised because alcohol makes him sick.
In over twenty years and the many people I meet ranging from solicitors, teachers, mums and dads, tradies and yes even my doctor I have only ever had one person state that the only reason they do not use marijuana is because it is illegal to do so.
People are either prone to use marijuana or they are not and just as prohibition on alcohol in the USA has proven….. the law is not a factor in their decision.
yeh but as soon as he was given the foriegn minister job he renegged on his previous comments and said that he supports the current governments policey on drugs, so in other words his a typical 'soft kock' politician with no personal opinion.

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