Obese men suffer discrimination

Posted in the Australia Forum

Ian Shanahan

Anonymous Proxy

#1 Jan 11, 2013
If its not bad enough with migrants taking our jobs, we have to suffer discrimination. some of us have glandular problems making it impossible to lose weight. should we be made to suffer for it. while refugees come here illegaly on boats. get a free house, car, job even if they have big fat massive arses.
Global truth

Australia

#2 Jan 11, 2013
If you are tall, light skin, young and slim there are great chances that you will be employed, the employers discriminate obese, black, old and short people, recently a survey published in Australia which exposed employer choose good looking guys over average ones, and good looks can fetch you on an average $32000 a year over average looking person through out your life of employment.
Elias

Glen Waverley, Australia

#3 Jan 11, 2013
Global truth wrote:
If you are tall, light skin, young and slim there are great chances that you will be employed, the employers discriminate obese, black, old and short people, recently a survey published in Australia which exposed employer choose good looking guys over average ones, and good looks can fetch you on an average $32000 a year over average looking person through out your life of employment.
Depends on which job sector. Any work involving client services invariably draw and pro-actively recruit attractive individuals. Appearance is less a priority for operational jobs or backroom jobs.
Shank

Australia

#4 Jan 11, 2013
Good looks bring a handsome return -$32,000 a year
January 7, 2013

GOOD looks matter for men - far more than previously believed.
The first Australian study of the financial return for physical attractiveness finds it is worth an astounding $32,150 in annual salary, with men of above-average looks typically commanding $81,750 compared with $49,600 for men with below-average looks.
The authors, Melbourne University economist Jeff Borland and a former Australian National University economist, Andrew Leigh, find the "plainness penalty" more important than the "beauty premium". Men whose looks are rated as below average by door-to-door interviewers typically earn 26 per cent less than average. Men whose looks are rated as above average earn 22 per cent more. For women the effect is smaller and harder to measure.
"I found something similar when I looked at the effect of politicians' appearance on their electability," said Dr Leigh, who is now a Labor MP. "Good looks helped male candidates more than they helped women. It could be that attractive women come up against the stereotype that they can't be both attractive and intelligent. There's no such thing as the dumb-blond syndrome for men."
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Property and mortgage expert Stephen Zamykal agrees.
A partner in five successful businesses, including National Property Buyers and a Mortgage Choice franchise, Mr Zamykal said he had never felt discriminated against because of his looks and it was possible they had helped.
''It's hard to know,'' said the 1.93 metre former AFL footballer who played for Essendon and North Melbourne in the 1990s.''I don't know if I am even good looking I know some people say I'm lucky to be tall, as height gives you presence.''
The researchers were asked to rate the appearance of interviewees on a six-point scale from "very much more attractive than average" to "well below average". Dr Leigh separately asked the interviewers to rate photos and found widespread agreement.
"It turns out beauty isn't in the eye of the beholder," he said. "There is a strong literature showing views about beauty are shared.''
Men with below-average looks were 15 per cent less likely than normal to be employed and were typically employed for a 9 per cent lower wage. They were also less likely to be married and less likely to be married to a woman of high income.
The findings about men remained constant in two surveys of 2000 individuals - an ANU survey in 1984 and one constructed by Dr Leigh and Professor Borland to replicate the ANU survey in 2009.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/executive-style/managem...
Elias

Glen Waverley, Australia

#5 Jan 12, 2013
Shank wrote:
Good looks bring a handsome return -$32,000 a year
January 7, 2013
GOOD looks matter for men - far more than previously believed.
The first Australian study of the financial return for physical attractiveness finds it is worth an astounding $32,150 in annual salary, with men of above-average looks typically commanding $81,750 compared with $49,600 for men with below-average looks.
The authors, Melbourne University economist Jeff Borland and a former Australian National University economist, Andrew Leigh, find the "plainness penalty" more important than the "beauty premium". Men whose looks are rated as below average by door-to-door interviewers typically earn 26 per cent less than average. Men whose looks are rated as above average earn 22 per cent more. For women the effect is smaller and harder to measure.
"I found something similar when I looked at the effect of politicians' appearance on their electability," said Dr Leigh, who is now a Labor MP. "Good looks helped male candidates more than they helped women. It could be that attractive women come up against the stereotype that they can't be both attractive and intelligent. There's no such thing as the dumb-blond syndrome for men."
Advertisement
Property and mortgage expert Stephen Zamykal agrees.
A partner in five successful businesses, including National Property Buyers and a Mortgage Choice franchise, Mr Zamykal said he had never felt discriminated against because of his looks and it was possible they had helped.
''It's hard to know,'' said the 1.93 metre former AFL footballer who played for Essendon and North Melbourne in the 1990s.''I don't know if I am even good looking I know some people say I'm lucky to be tall, as height gives you presence.''
The researchers were asked to rate the appearance of interviewees on a six-point scale from "very much more attractive than average" to "well below average". Dr Leigh separately asked the interviewers to rate photos and found widespread agreement.
"It turns out beauty isn't in the eye of the beholder," he said. "There is a strong literature showing views about beauty are shared.''
Men with below-average looks were 15 per cent less likely than normal to be employed and were typically employed for a 9 per cent lower wage. They were also less likely to be married and less likely to be married to a woman of high income.
The findings about men remained constant in two surveys of 2000 individuals - an ANU survey in 1984 and one constructed by Dr Leigh and Professor Borland to replicate the ANU survey in 2009.
Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/executive-style/managem...
An interesting study, one little problem is causality. It's possible unattractive people suffer anxiety over their looks which leads to poorer performance at work. This certainly is observed in university where attractive female students often do better than their less attractive counterparts.

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