Consent policy on pelvic exams while unconscious inadequate: Experts

Mar 27, 2012 Full story: Ottawa Citizen 13

A pelvic exam performed by a resident for training purposes without explicit consent from the woman "arguably constitutes a battery in law," experts from Dalhousie University contend.

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Cynthia

Toronto, Canada

#1 Mar 29, 2012
Esme R

Lombard, IL

#2 Aug 24, 2012
This is a good and valid take on the issue and I hope something can really be done. http://www.vaginalmeshlawsuit.com/pelvic-orga...
why

United States

#3 Aug 25, 2012
Why is it the politicians can't stay out of America's vaginas?
CHRIS

Wilbraham, MA

#4 Sep 19, 2012
It still goes on in Canada. It was stopped in 2003 in the U.S. when States passed their ,"patients bill of rights act."
Debz

Ottawa, Canada

#5 Sep 20, 2012
CHRIS wrote:
It still goes on in Canada. It was stopped in 2003 in the U.S. when States passed their ,"patients bill of rights act."
If anyone knows, I would be interested to find out what the situation is in the UK - re pelvic exams and consent - when unconscious.

Thanks
CHRIS

Bedford, MA

#6 Sep 21, 2012
Debz wrote:
<quoted text>
If anyone knows, I would be interested to find out what the situation is in the UK - re pelvic exams and consent - when unconscious.
Thanks
I believe their medical industry stopped raping woman at about the same time U.S. male docs were FORCED to stop. The raping continues in Canada with the governments knowledge.
Debz

Ottawa, Canada

#7 Sep 21, 2012
CHRIS wrote:
<quoted text> I believe their medical industry stopped raping woman at about the same time U.S. male docs were FORCED to stop. The raping continues in Canada with the governments knowledge.
They're probably paying them off with free porn videos:

Sept 20 2012 Article:

TORONTO - A suspended Hamilton doctor who was sentenced to 16 months imprisonment for sexually assaulting two patients including one he made a pornographic movie of while she was unconscious could soon have his licence revoked by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario
Debz

Ottawa, Canada

#9 Oct 6, 2012
pailrider wrote:
<quoted text>
in teaching hospitals, no specific consent.
Found from another forum - sent to Patient Modesty site (Modest Woman):
Thank you for your site. I'd like to share what happened to me as a warning to others.
I'm very well educated, but I'm also quite modest. Because my health is excellent, and because of my issues with modesty, I had not seen a gynecologist in over 20 years. My husband finally convinced me to see a doctor when my problems became severe. It turned out I needed a hysterectomy.
Before making the appointment with the female gynecological surgeon, I checked with the receptionist to make sure that the doctor had an all female practice. I was assured that she did--including nurses and assistants. I also told the person I thought would be assisting with the surgery that I wanted only females during the surgery.
About 10 minutes before surgery, I learned that not only would the anesthesiologist be male, so would the circulating nurse. I was mortified, but agreed to allow both because I thought I'd at least be awake for the prep. Besides, I knew that once I was out, I would have no control who saw what and I had better play nice or things might get really bad while I was out.
To be clear, both the anesthesiologist and nurse knew I was very concerned--my modesty concerns were no secret to anyone. As the two men entered the waiting area silently, I was talking to my husband with my head turned in the opposite direction of where they entered and of my IV. They were standing there for about 15 seconds when I suddenly realized they where handling my IV. I said, "please don't give me anything. I want to be aware so I know who's in the OR." The anesthesiologist said, "don't worry, we're taking care of you." That's the last thing I remember. I have no other memory for over 6 hours.
Debz

Ottawa, Canada

#10 Oct 6, 2012
pailrider wrote:
<quoted text>
Think you will find it was supposed to have stopped, but I believe it still carry's on in teaching hospitals, no specific consent.
Part 2 Continued:

The day after the surgery, I saw the person who I thought was the assistant for the surgery. She told me and my husband that the surgery went well and gave me post-op instructions before I was released--she made no indication that she was not in the OR with me. As a matter of fact all her comments intentionally lead us to believe she had assisted the doctor.
Finally, a week after surgery, when I was still having trouble remembering things, I called the anesthesiologist to see why I couldn't even remember being taking into surgery, being prepped or when I was given anesthesia. He told me, "oh, that's probably the Versed I gave you in the waiting area." I was stunned. I reminded him that I had explicitly asked to NOT be drugged before entering the OR. He told me that they knew I'd object to the males in the room, so they gave me the Versed to "calm you down."
I was mortified.
I then requested my records from the hospital and learned that the team was almost entirely male--including the assistant.
I called the surgeon whom I had trusted to try to make sense of what happened. Basically, she told me that all the men are "professionals" and that I shouldn't worry about what they did or saw--they do it all the time. Let's be clear about what they did and saw--they stripped me completely naked, spread my legs apart, put my legs into stirrups, scrubbed my body, cleaned my vagina, let me lay naked for at least an another 10 minutes while I dried, and inserted their fingers and other objects into my vagina, all without my explicit consent and after being rendered unconscious deceitfully and against my will. When I asked her why I wasn't informed that she replaced her normal assistant with a male, she in essence let me know it's not her responsibility to tell me who will be assisting or who is in the surgical area.
When I contacted the hospital to find out why, when 90% of all nurses are female, would they put males to assist for gynecological surgery, I was informed that gender does not matter, all nurses are professionals.
I pointed out to both the doctor and the hospital that not one OBGYN in the area has males assist when the patient is wake and that woman should be treated with the same level of respect when unconscious as they are when conscious. Both said that surgery is different--"that's why people are sedated." Hospitals/surgeons don't want patients to know what's happening during surgery--"it's not necessary. Most patients like you would just object, so sedation helps everyone."
Needless to say, I will never allow myself to be sedated again.
Further--I'm more than happy to help in your effort to bring dignity and humanity to the treatment of patients.
Sign me up as a volunteer
Debz

Ottawa, Canada

#11 Oct 6, 2012
CHRIS wrote:
<quoted text> I believe their medical industry stopped raping woman at about the same time U.S. male docs were FORCED to stop. The raping continues in Canada with the governments knowledge.
Part 1 relayed to Patient Modesty Website - assault under anaesthetic...male attendance against patients expressed wishes....via use of drug - Versed:

Thank you for your site. I'd like to share what happened to me as a warning to others.



I'm very well educated, but I'm also quite modest. Because my health is excellent, and because of my issues with modesty, I had not seen a gynecologist in over 20 years. My husband finally convinced me to see a doctor when my problems became severe. It turned out I needed a hysterectomy.



Before making the appointment with the female gynecological surgeon, I checked with the receptionist to make sure that the doctor had an all female practice. I was assured that she did--including nurses and assistants. I also told the person I thought would be assisting with the surgery that I wanted only females during the surgery.



About 10 minutes before surgery, I learned that not only would the anesthesiologist be male, so would the circulating nurse. I was mortified, but agreed to allow both because I thought I'd at least be awake for the prep. Besides, I knew that once I was out, I would have no control who saw what and I had better play nice or things might get really bad while I was out.



To be clear, both the anesthesiologist and nurse knew I was very concerned--my modesty concerns were no secret to anyone. As the two men entered the waiting area silently, I was talking to my husband with my head turned in the opposite direction of where they entered and of my IV. They were standing there for about 15 seconds when I suddenly realized they where handling my IV. I said, "please don't give me anything. I want to be aware so I know who's in the OR." The anesthesiologist said, "don't worry, we're taking care of you." That's the last thing I remember. I have no other memory for over 6 hours.

Debz

Ottawa, Canada

#13 Oct 7, 2012
pailrider wrote:
<quoted text>
I consider another main issue/warning/alert. In some teaching hospitals, groups of doctor are in waiting' to do internal exams after non related operation, with no specific patients consent, to put it mildly, doctors group rape within the law.
Seriously - this is all too disturbing - and I totalloy used the same term - this is surely a human rights issue and i wonder whetehr such cases should start reaching those courts
Debz

Ottawa, Canada

#14 Oct 8, 2012
pailrider wrote:
<quoted text>
I consider another main issue/warning/alert. In some teaching hospitals, groups of doctor are in waiting' to do internal exams after non related operation, with no specific patients consent, to put it mildly, doctors group rape within the law.
Any excuse to get a woman's kit off:

Who can presume to understand the madness of some married couples?

The sex talk, part 2: The premarital exam

Written by Vanessa Perkins | Posted: October 8, 2012

In my last article, I focused on the importance of sexual education and the need for it in our public schools. While discussing the issue of sexual education, I also wanted to explore the phenomenon of premarital exams.

A premarital exam generally happens before a woman gets married and is not very common outside of Utah. In other states, a premarital exam is a blood test. In Utah, it can include a full pelvic exam and a Q-and-A portion, where both women and men are encouraged to bring whatever questions they may have to the table. Each exam is different depending on the doctor, but this is the general format

http://www.uvureview.com/2012/10/08/the-sex-t ...

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#15 Nov 22, 2012
Esme R wrote:
This is a good and valid take on the issue and I hope something can really be done. http://www.vaginalmeshlawsuit.com/pelvic-orga...
ANOTHER EXCELLENT RESOUCE:

http://forwomenseyesonly.wordpress.com/

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