Turkey inspires Russia to fight match...

Turkey inspires Russia to fight match-fixing

There are 3 comments on the Today's Zaman story from Aug 29, 2011, titled Turkey inspires Russia to fight match-fixing. In it, Today's Zaman reports that:

According to a Russian joke, popular nowadays in the community of football fans, fixed matches are like UFOs -- everyone talks about them, but no one has ever seen one.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Today's Zaman.

gimme a break

United States

#1 Aug 29, 2011
According to a Russian joke, popular nowadays in the community of football fans, fixed matches are like UFOs -- everyone talks about them, but no one has ever seen one. While the rumors are countless, there are very few people who are ready to unveil the facts. One of them, coach Alexander Tarkhanov, well-known for his work with Spartak Moscow and CSKA Moscow, agreed to tell Today’s Zaman his story.


“In 2010 I was coaching the first division club Khimki. The season started out all right, but after a few months weird things began to happen. We arrived in Saransk to play a match against Mordovia. When we entered the hotel, the opponent side’s coach, Sergei Dikarev, came up to me and said,‘I want to talk to you about the match.’ I didn’t understand him at first.‘Which match?’ I asked.‘To talk about the points,’ he said,‘How shall we play the match?’--‘Have you gone mad, Sergei? We’re going to play football, nothing else,’ I replied. Two weeks later, before a match against Volgar, our goalkeeper, Roman Berezovskiy, received an anonymous call trying to talk him into missing some goals. Roman immediately reported it to Khimki’s managers.”

Tarkhanov told the media about these incidents, but no one was punished.“At a press conference I made a statement that we were asked to play fixed matches. I wanted to keep my team from being approached in the future, because match-fixing is an ordinary thing in the first division. From that time on I haven’t been asked to speak about those incidents. The Ethics Committee of the Russian Football Union (RFU) promised to investigate the case but it hasn’t yet,” Tarkhanov said.

Guesses about whether a match will be or has been fixed are probably the trendiest topic in the Russian sports press. One of Russia’s greatest football experts, ex-Spartak Moscow star Alexander Bubnov, told Today’s Zaman that suspicion is not only fashionable, but useful too.“For instance, predictions said that the recent match between Volga and Kuban was going to be fixed. But the media set up a clamor about it and finally the clubs played normally. The same thing went for the match between Anji and Nalchik in June.”

According to Bubnov, the phenomenon of match-fixing emerged a long time ago, but in Soviet times it was rare, and not as cynical as nowadays.“It has become a massive problem since the late 1990s, after the appearance of legalized betting pools. The rise of the Premier League’s rivalry made it a necessity to buy matches, and the growing amount of sponsorship made the resources to buy them available. The more money is invested, the more investors want to provide the desired results, especially when a given club is going to be relegated to a lower league.”

In contrast to journalists, officials don’t seem to be too worried. For instance, Minister of Sport, Tourism and Youth Policy Vitaly Mutko told Today’s Zaman that “there’s no point in paying too much attention to match-fixing, since the problem is exaggerated.”“We have been observing the recent investigation in Turkey. They’re of great importance for local and European football. We can make use of Turkey’s, Greece’s, and Italy’s experience, but you need a strong premise to start all that noise. Turkey had a strong premise, we don’t. The Russian champion’s title is not a thing you can buy. Of course we need to restore the good image of Russian football before World Cup 2018, but match-fixing is not our weakest point. We have more important problems,” Mutko claimed.

Bubnov disagrees with him.“If even one play is fixed, it means that the season’s results are illegitimate and the league is corrupted. Match-fixing exists only because no one is afraid of being punished.”

Read more: http://www.todayszaman.com/news-255229-turkey...
Pro Ukraine

UK

#2 Aug 30, 2011
gimme a break wrote:
According to a Russian joke, popular nowadays in the community of football fans, fixed matches are like UFOs -- everyone talks about them, but no one has ever seen one. While the rumors are countless, there are very few people who are ready to unveil the facts. One of them, coach Alexander Tarkhanov, well-known for his work with Spartak Moscow and CSKA Moscow, agreed to tell Today’s Zaman his story.
“In 2010 I was coaching the first division club Khimki. The season started out all right, but after a few months weird things began to happen. We arrived in Saransk to play a match against Mordovia. When we entered the hotel, the opponent side’s coach, Sergei Dikarev, came up to me and said,‘I want to talk to you about the match.’ I didn’t understand him at first.‘Which match?’ I asked.‘To talk about the points,’ he said,‘How shall we play the match?’--‘Have you gone mad, Sergei? We’re going to play football, nothing else,’ I replied. Two weeks later, before a match against Volgar, our goalkeeper, Roman Berezovskiy, received an anonymous call trying to talk him into missing some goals. Roman immediately reported it to Khimki’s managers.”
Tarkhanov told the media about these incidents, but no one was punished.“At a press conference I made a statement that we were asked to play fixed matches. I wanted to keep my team from being approached in the future, because match-fixing is an ordinary thing in the first division. From that time on I haven’t been asked to speak about those incidents. The Ethics Committee of the Russian Football Union (RFU) promised to investigate the case but it hasn’t yet,” Tarkhanov said.
Guesses about whether a match will be or has been fixed are probably the trendiest topic in the Russian sports press. One of Russia’s greatest football experts, ex-Spartak Moscow star Alexander Bubnov, told Today’s Zaman that suspicion is not only fashionable, but useful too.“For instance, predictions said that the recent match between Volga and Kuban was going to be fixed. But the media set up a clamor about it and finally the clubs played normally. The same thing went for the match between Anji and Nalchik in June.”
According to Bubnov, the phenomenon of match-fixing emerged a long time ago, but in Soviet times it was rare, and not as cynical as nowadays.“It has become a massive problem since the late 1990s, after the appearance of legalized betting pools. The rise of the Premier League’s rivalry made it a necessity to buy matches, and the growing amount of sponsorship made the resources to buy them available. The more money is invested, the more investors want to provide the desired results, especially when a given club is going to be relegated to a lower league.”
In contrast to journalists, officials don’t seem to be too worried. For instance, Minister of Sport, Tourism and Youth Policy Vitaly Mutko told Today’s Zaman that “there’s no point in paying too much attention to match-fixing, since the problem is exaggerated.”“We have been observing the recent investigation in Turkey. They’re of great importance for local and European football. We can make use of Turkey’s, Greece’s, and Italy’s experience, but you need a strong premise to start all that noise. Turkey had a strong premise, we don’t. The Russian champion’s title is not a thing you can buy. Of course we need to restore the good image of Russian football before World Cup 2018, but match-fixing is not our weakest point. We have more important problems,” Mutko claimed.
Bubnov disagrees with him.“If even one play is fixed, it means that the season’s results are illegitimate and the league is corrupted. Match-fixing exists only because no one is afraid of being punished.”
Read more: http://www.todayszaman.com/news-255229-turkey...
Everything else in Russia is corrupt, so it's no surprise that football matches are fixed and the authorities turn a blind eye to it.
Real -Time News

United States

#3 Aug 30, 2011
Pro Ukraine wrote:
<quoted text>Everything else in Russia is corrupt, so it's no surprise that football matches are fixed and the authorities turn a blind eye to it.
Russians are like Chinese. They need others to inspire them, or to steal ideas from others. Their empty heads can't some up with new ideas.

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