France now neutral on Quebec

Oct 15, 2012 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: The Chronicle Herald

France has officially revived its traditionally neutral policy on Quebec independence that was temporarily interrupted under the resolutely pro-Canadian-unity era of Nicolas Sarkozy.

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41 - 54 of 54 Comments Last updated Nov 10, 2012
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Rio

Bromley, UK

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#44
Nov 10, 2012
 
straa wrote:
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How misinformed can someone be, the usa constitution is based on British law, that is common historical knowledge, didn't you go to school
What a wanker!!
The US Constitution is certainly not based on Indian law: there is none!!

“Seriously guys...”

Since: May 12

The 'Shwa

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#45
Nov 10, 2012
 
Alexanddre wrote:
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FC U C K.K.K. YOU Whisgean Zoda, how's that?
No, and don't ask again.
Anonymous

UK

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#46
Nov 10, 2012
 
Anonymous

UK

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#47
Nov 10, 2012
 
Usa constitution, based on BRITISH law, France just as irrelivent as they always have and always will be, sorry
Anonymous

UK

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#48
Nov 10, 2012
 
"The constitution of the united states was based on English common law"
Http://drkatesview.Wordpress.com/2011/05/26/t...
Anonymous

UK

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#49
Nov 10, 2012
 
Alexanddre wrote:
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The US Contitution is based on the ideas of Les Lumieres, it is based on French ideas. France also helped the US free itself from England. Yes how misinformed can someone be to think that the US constitution is based on England's, you must be a complete idoit.
What will you say now that I have proven you wrong and shown that the American constitution is based on English law, I thought that was common knowledge, it is in britain, or maybe you get fought fake history in French schools, or maybe you are just stupid, it doesn't matter thoe because I've just proven that the American constitution is based on ENGLISH law, so ate many many other countries, while France never had the power or strength to influence the world like britain did
Anonymous

UK

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#50
Nov 10, 2012
 
At the top of the page in the link I provided, it states, and I will quote it for you, "the constitution of the united states was based on English common law" so it had nothing to do with France, there are hundreds of results when you Google, and they all say that the constitution is based on English law
Rio

UK

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#51
Nov 10, 2012
 
straa wrote:
in the link I provided, it states, and I will quote it for you, "the constitution of the united states was based on English common law"
The Constitution of the United States was created to provide for an elected presidential executive controlled by a Congress, under a federal system.

Written 250+ years ago, I fail to see how it could take its inspiration from a parliamentary monarchy of the time! When the US declared their constitution, most people in England couldn't even vote, and parliament was mostly hereditary.

It's US common law which was inspired by the English common law, but not its constitution.

“Seriously guys...”

Since: May 12

The 'Shwa

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#52
Nov 10, 2012
 
Rio wrote:
<quoted text>
The Constitution of the United States was created to provide for an elected presidential executive controlled by a Congress, under a federal system.
Written 250+ years ago, I fail to see how it could take its inspiration from a parliamentary monarchy of the time! When the US declared their constitution, most people in England couldn't even vote, and parliament was mostly hereditary.
It's US common law which was inspired by the English common law, but not its constitution.
Yes and no. The US Constitution draws several of it's concepts from the Magna Carta.

“Seriously guys...”

Since: May 12

The 'Shwa

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#53
Nov 10, 2012
 
EDIT* its concepts, not "it's concepts".
Rio

UK

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#54
Nov 10, 2012
 
Whisgean Zoda wrote:
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Yes and no. The US Constitution draws several of it's concepts from the Magna Carta.
The Magna Carta had been granted by the king to recognise the representation of the nobility in affairs of state, and curtail the absolutism of the monarchy.
It was very far from "democracy"!
Unlike the US, Britain wasn't a proper democracy until the last decades of the 19th century, and even then ...
Cana

George, South Africa

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#55
Nov 10, 2012
 
straa wrote:
<quoted text>
How misinformed can someone be, the usa constitution is based on British law, that is common historical knowledge, didn't you go to school
Yes I went to school up to grade twelve, and i'm envious of others that went onto higher learning. For me work was more important for many reasons, but regardless i still believe the French were more influential to the US for their constitution, and republic.
The Greeks were the most influential for all the western societies, many good democratic examples we enjoy now had there inspriation from the Greeks!
Rio

UK

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#56
Nov 10, 2012
 
Cana wrote:
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i still believe the French were more influential to the US for their constitution, and republic.
At the time of the American Revolution and the Declaration of Independence, France was an absolute monarchy without any people's representation. I fail to see how that inspired the American Constitution.

French philosophers wrote about the "Droits de l'Homme" then, and there was quite a current of liberal ideas in France at the time but it was mostly against the Old Regime.

France may have helped the insurgents to defeat the English troops in the American colonies, but it was all part of the Anglo-French rivalry in the New World.

In fact, it was the example of the American democracy which was to play an inspirational role in the subsequent French Revolution, from 1789. Not the other way round!
Cana

George, South Africa

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#57
Nov 10, 2012
 
Rio wrote:
<quoted text>
At the time of the American Revolution and the Declaration of Independence, France was an absolute monarchy without any people's representation. I fail to see how that inspired the American Constitution.
French philosophers wrote about the "Droits de l'Homme" then, and there was quite a current of liberal ideas in France at the time but it was mostly against the Old Regime.
France may have helped the insurgents to defeat the English troops in the American colonies, but it was all part of the Anglo-French rivalry in the New World.
In fact, it was the example of the American democracy which was to play an inspirational role in the subsequent French Revolution, from 1789. Not the other way round!
Thanks for putting more meat on the bone, but you are supporting my point of French influence on US democracy. Where else other that an unjust enviroment do new and innovative ideas come from.
Montesquieu was suppose to be one of the French liberals that influenced the US.

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