China likely to buy more Spanish gove...

China likely to buy more Spanish government bonds: vice premier

There are 16 comments on the People's Daily Online story from Jan 5, 2011, titled China likely to buy more Spanish government bonds: vice premier. In it, People's Daily Online reports that:

Chinese Vice Premier Li Keqiang shakes hands with Spain's Second Deputy Prime Minister Elena Salgado, in Madrid, Spain, Jan.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at People's Daily Online.

RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Maple Ridge, Canada

#1 Jan 5, 2011
GO CHINA
NVN777

Tarzana, CA

#2 Jan 5, 2011
China is stupid
smallville

Shanghai, China

#3 Jan 5, 2011
NVN777 wrote:
China is stupid
No other choice. Jew Bernanke is busy printing money.
Andrez Lopez

El Paso, TX

#4 Jan 5, 2011
smallville wrote:
<quoted text>
No other choice. Jew Bernanke is busy printing money.
I always suspected that Bernake was a Jew. Thanks for confirming it.
Andrez Lopez

El Paso, TX

#5 Jan 5, 2011
NVN777 wrote:
China is stupid
Stupid because more countries will depend on China?

I don't see your logic.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Maple Ridge, Canada

#7 Jan 6, 2011
NVN777 wrote:
China is stupid
for a guy posting from a state that would be in even worse shape without Chinese tourist...

no they are not... China makes $170 billion a year from Europe
snowflake

San Francisco, CA

#8 Jan 6, 2011
What can you expect from NVN777 aka Drgunzet? China have a lot of guts buying up other peoples' bonds what if they default?

Since: Mar 08

Long Island City, NY

#9 Jan 6, 2011
Lower credit rating means higher interest rate, as compare to buying US government bond at a lower interest with as much risk, not to mention a deflating dollar will cut into even your initial investments.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Maple Ridge, Canada

#10 Jan 6, 2011
Zsari wrote:
Lower credit rating means higher interest rate, as compare to buying US government bond at a lower interest with as much risk, not to mention a deflating dollar will cut into even your initial investments.
I see China is looking to back stop the EU more over the USA these days...
the examiner

Montréal, Canada

#11 Jan 6, 2011
the US dollar is not doing well right now. It's worth less than the Canadian dollar.

If you want high interest rate then the risk is higher too. Spain may pay higher interest rate for its bonds but not long ago people here said it's one of the PIGS countries so buying Spanish government issued bonds might not be a good idea.
snowflake

San Francisco, CA

#12 Jan 6, 2011
China is buying up many other nations debt, what are the other nations using as collateral? That's the multi-trillion dollar question. I hope the other countries did not signed away their souls.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Maple Ridge, Canada

#13 Jan 6, 2011
the examiner wrote:
the US dollar is not doing well right now. It's worth less than the Canadian dollar.
If you want high interest rate then the risk is higher too. Spain may pay higher interest rate for its bonds but not long ago people here said it's one of the PIGS countries so buying Spanish government issued bonds might not be a good idea.
probably a good idea... if you make 170 billion a year from the EU

and your trade just jumped up 33% for the first 11 months of 2010 to 433 billion USD with the EU... so you are looking at 470 to 480 billion a Year in Bilateral trade....

PLUS this....

Spain

Chinese businesses became part of Spanish urban life - Feature

Posted : Wed, 28 Jul 2010 05:00:19 GMT
By : Sinikka Tarvainen

Madrid - Practically every neighbourhood in the Spanish capital Madrid has at least one shop like Ana's.

Ana is not her real name, but like many Chinese entrepreneurs in Spain she uses a Spanish first name, which is easier for her clients to remember.

Ana's shop on Colombia Street in north Madrid displays a sign that says "foodstuffs," but it is more like a mini-supermarket, offering products ranging from cleaning supplies to toiletries at rock-bottom prices.

The shop is nearly always open. Despite her long working hours, Ana, who is in her early 40s, is always friendly and quick to smile. She speaks just enough Spanish to quote prices, help clients find products and hold simple conversations.

Ana and her husband came to Spain two years ago, leaving their 10- year-old son with his grandmother in Beijing, she explains in broken Spanish, as Chinese blares from a television set in the background.

Shops like Ana's have become ubiquitous in many cities in Spain, where the number of Chinese immigrants has risen to about 154,000, up from 124,000 in 2007, according to the Labour and Immigration Ministry.

Most of the new arrivals come from the south-eastern Chinese region of Qingtian and live in Madrid or Barcelona, according to Spanish media reports.

There are large numbers of Chinese businesses in some neighbourhoods, such as Madrid's multicultural Lavapies, which has hundreds of Chinese shops and restaurants. But the capital does not have a real Chinatown, because Chinese establishments are scattered all over the city.

While Spain's economic crisis is driving other immigrants back home, the Chinese presence is only becoming more visible. They now run more than 20,000 businesses in Spain, the daily El Mundo reported.

The immigrants first became known as owners of Chinese restaurants - which number more than 2,000 in Spain - and of "all-for-1-euro" shops selling all kinds of cheap, China-made products.

Now, however, they run a large variety of businesses, ranging from typical Spanish bars and hairdressing salons to travel agencies and insurance companies.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Maple Ridge, Canada

#14 Jan 6, 2011
The Chinese no longer employ just other Chinese but Spaniards, too, in a country with a 20-per-cent unemployment rate.

"I would be out of work if I had not decided to work for them," said Juan Perez, an instructor at the Woo Fu driving school in the eastern city of Valencia.

A few years ago, Chinese immigrants made headlines mainly for running clandestine textile factories employing other Chinese - often illegal immigrants - in slave-like conditions, or for selling pirated CDs and DVDs.

Today, such news has partly been replaced with Chinese rags-to- riches stories, such as that of industrialists Li Tie, 33, and Yong Ping, 43.

Today, such news has partly been replaced with Chinese rags-to- riches stories, such as that of industrialists Li Tie, 33, and Yong Ping, 43.

Li Tie started two decades ago on Madrid street corners selling bags. Now he and Yong Ping have opened a 40,000-square-metre commercial and industrial centre - one of the largest such projects ever undertaken by foreigners in Spain- with plans to add a four-star hotel.

"The banks give us (Chinese) loans easily, because we are good at paying them back," Yong Ping told El Mundo.

Despite many Spaniards being acquainted with shopkeepers like Ana, few of them have made close friends with Chinese immigrants, who have the reputation of forming a rather closed community.

A key aspect of their commercial success is that members of the same family run related businesses and give interest-free loans to each other, social anthropologist Joaquin Beltran explained.

"Business logic goes together with family honour," he said.

The somewhat mysterious reputation of the Chinese community is reflected in some half-joking myths about them, such as the saying that they do not die.

There are, indeed, few graves of Chinese immigrants in Spanish graveyards, but the explanation is simple: most Chinese return home to retire.

The relative isolation of the Chinese community is beginning to crumble as a younger generation grows up in Spain, learns perfect Spanish and adapts to local customs.

The growing Chinese presence has fuelled Spanish interest in Chinese culture and business opportunities, with some 20,000 Spaniards now studying Mandarin in schools, universities and private language centres.

Some Spanish business owners complain about what they regard as unfair Chinese competition, but many Spaniards could no longer do without their local Chinese shop.

"In business," said Ji Wang, a lawyer in Madrid, "we are all equal."
AMERICAN EXPAT

Spain

#15 Jan 7, 2011
Another interesting point: several years ago a reporter investigated what happens to Chinese bodies after death here in Spain. Not a single grave could be found in any cemetery in Spain, despite an exhaustive search. The media reported the point for several days, but finally dropped the issue. It is still unknown as to what the Chinese do with dead bodies in Spain. They have been in Spain for decades now, so there has to be at least one death?
smallville

Shanghai, China

#16 Jan 7, 2011
Andrez Lopez wrote:
<quoted text>
I always suspected that Bernake was a Jew. Thanks for confirming it.
Fed chairmans:

Arthur F. Burns (February 1, 1970 – January 31, 1978) Austro-Hungarian Jew

Alan Greenspan (August 11, 1987 – January 31, 2006) Austro-Hungarian Jew

Ben S. Bernanke (February 1, 2006 to at least 2014 ) Austro-Hungarian Jew

White house chief of staff:
Joshua Bolten 2006–2009 Bush administration Jew
Rahm Emanuel 2009–2010 Obama administration Jew
Pete Rouse 2010- Obama administration Jew father
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Maple Ridge, Canada

#17 Jan 7, 2011
AMERICAN EXPAT wrote:
Another interesting point: several years ago a reporter investigated what happens to Chinese bodies after death here in Spain. Not a single grave could be found in any cemetery in Spain, despite an exhaustive search. The media reported the point for several days, but finally dropped the issue. It is still unknown as to what the Chinese do with dead bodies in Spain. They have been in Spain for decades now, so there has to be at least one death?
probably get the Triads to transport their bodies back to China... in return they probably give up their Visa/passports for the burial and money for the Family...

and then a new Chinese migrant is born

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