Kudrin resigns from Russian cabinet

Kudrin resigns from Russian cabinet

There are 13 comments on the en.rian.ru story from Sep 26, 2011, titled Kudrin resigns from Russian cabinet. In it, en.rian.ru reports that:

Alexei Kudrin resigned on Monday as Russia's finance minister and deputy prime minister after a dispute with President Dmitry Medvedev.

The president has already signed Kudrin's resignation request, the presidential spokeswoman said.

Medvedev told Kudrin earlier in the day that he should resign. He invoked the head of state’s wrath after saying he would decline a job in a future Russian government that Medvedev is likely to head.

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“Pink Ponies of Justice”

Since: Sep 07

Moscow, Russia

#1 Sep 26, 2011
Alexei Kudrin was born October 12, 1960 in Dobele, Latvia. A Russian economist, he has served as Russian Finance Minister since May 2000. Following Medvedevís announcement in September 2011 that he will back Vladimir Putin for a second presidential term, Kudrin announced he would not be part of a next government under Medvedev. On September 26, 2011, Kudrin resigned as finance minister and deputy prime minister.

In 1983, Kudrin graduated from the Economics Faculty of Leningrad State University. In December 1985 he began graduate study at the Institute of Economics of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He spent the late 1980s working as a researcher at the Academy of Sciences, before taking a position in the St. Petersburg city administration under influential Mayor Anatoly Sobchak in 1990. For the first three years he served in various financial posts, including deputy chairman of the Committee for Economic Reform. In 1993 he was appointed deputy mayor, a position he would serve until Sobchak was defeated by Vladimir Yakovlev in mayoral elections in 1996. During Kudrinís time in the St. Petersburg administration, future President Vladimir Putin also served as a deputy mayor.

Following Sobchakís defeat, Kudrin moved to Moscow, becoming deputy chief of Boris Yeltsinís Presidential Administraiton, with responsibility for trade, economic and scientific-technological cooperation. In March 1997, Kudrin was appointed first deputy finance minister. He was promoted to finance minister in 2000, following Putinís election to the presidency. In the same year Kudrin was appointed deputy prime minister, serving in the post until 2004. He was reappointed deputy prime minister in September 2007.

Kudrin is widely credited with safeguarding the Russian economy during his term in office. His plan to pour a percentage of oil revenues into a stabilization fund, despite criticism from other members of the government, proved particularly insightful. The government later used this fund to mitigate the effects of the financial crisis in the late 2000s.

In mid 2011, Kudrin was tipped as a potential future prime minister in a new government formed after 2012 presidential elections. In late September 2011, however, this appointment looked unlikely following President Dmitry Medvedevís announcement that he will back Vladimir Putin in March 2012 elections. In turn Putin later said that he would make Medvedev prime minister of the new government. Two days later Kudrin announced that he would not work in a cabinet run by Medvedev, citing the presidentís support for increased military spending, which is set to grow by 3 percent of GDP between 2012 and 2014, for his reticence.

But Kudrinís track record is likely to secure him some position in Putinís team to help the current prime minister finance his ambitious plans. In the run-up to State Duma elections Putin plans to increase bureaucratsí salaries by 6.5 percent. He is also aiming to push Russia into the world's top five economies by 2016, for which he has said economic growth will need to increase to between six and seven percent per year. Kudrinís steady hands could also prove crucial in fighting rising capital outflows, as foreign investors pull funds out of Russia amid fears of rampant corruption and restrictive bureaucracy.

Kudrin has been married twice and has two children.

Since: Apr 11

Location hidden

#2 Sep 26, 2011
Kudrin did not resign, he was forced to resign by Medvedev.
The president made the right decision.

Romanov.

“Pink Ponies of Justice”

Since: Sep 07

Moscow, Russia

#3 Sep 26, 2011
He was fired by Putin's submission to Medvedev.
Dr Steelhammer

Calgary, Canada

#5 Sep 26, 2011
Well, Well.... looks like the Russia Show Trials tradition continues..... " Show Politics " .... Orchestrated firings in public ? Right . Got it. Does anyone really think that intelligenyt and educated professional economist and finance minister of eleven years... Kudrin would do this unless it was scripted by Putin and agreed to by Medvedev ? Pay him off now?... later ? or now or later ?.... and Let's make it seem like real politics. I don't buy this fake political show for a second. Quite chilling actually. Reminds me of the 1930 show trials... gone high tech political.

Since: Apr 11

Location hidden

#6 Sep 26, 2011
Shut up Sticks you old fool.
Dr Steelhammer

Calgary, Canada

#7 Sep 26, 2011
Small Town America UGX wrote:
<quoted text>
Put another way, Putin fired him because he was at odds with putin's puppet, Medvedev.
Don't be so gullible. It is all a show for the dumbed down public in russia, like all of the fake pre - ordained show of all russian politics. The whole thing is a series of Potemkin villages within Potemkin villages.... ad infinitim. Total sham. No reality to it at all. It is very russian. I know the psychology very well indeed. It is the russian conundrum of a russian public that not only wants to be deceived but is in fact deceived by a willing government, over and over again. It is very russian and very serf - like . You got to be a russian background person to understand it , or you have to grow up in russian culture.The western mind cannot comprehend it, as it is very oriental.The closest thing is the concept of " chinese wall " in oriental culture dynamics.... you know, but you don't know all at the same time.

“Pink Ponies of Justice”

Since: Sep 07

Russia

#8 Sep 26, 2011
Of course it wasn't a spectacle, the Canadian Steelhammer know nothing about Russian or oriental psychology. This situation was bad for Medvedev's image - his minister openly showed disrespect to him, like if he already not a president.
Observer

United States

#9 Sep 27, 2011
Sounds like a Colin Powell replay.
Dr Steelhammer

Calgary, Canada

#10 Sep 27, 2011
Winston Churchill's quotation, made in a radio broadcast in October 1939:

"I cannot forecast to you the action of Russia. It is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma; but perhaps there is a key. That key is Russian national interest." I agree with that statement. Russia is quintessentially ' Byzantine " in its politics. It has always been that way. Nothing is as it appears in Russia. Oh, I think I know enough about the 'russian mindset' and psychology from my four grandparents and parents that were all born in various parts of the Russian Empire or USSR!
Observer

United States

#11 Sep 27, 2011
Dr Steelhammer wrote:
Oh, I think I know enough about the 'russian mindset' and psychology from my four grandparents and parents that were all born in various parts of the Russian Empire or USSR!
Yada yada yada, you don't even know if rain falls or goes in Russia, or if you're coming or going for that matter.

But I do appreciate the 'byzantine' comment from Churchill. It's good that you aspire to higher intellectual thought.
Observer

United States

#12 Sep 27, 2011
Besides, you've told us a dozen times already how your relatives were all cossacks, who were essentially Russia's version of Haiti's tonton macoute or certain subcultures in American politics, so what insights could such neanderthals possibly have?
Dr Steelhammer

Edmonton, Canada

#13 Sep 27, 2011
Observer wrote:
Besides, you've told us a dozen times already how your relatives were all cossacks, who were essentially Russia's version of Haiti's tonton macoute or certain subcultures in American politics, so what insights could such neanderthals possibly have?
You are an insolent jackass. Don't respond to my analyses, if that is all you have to say.
wow

United States

#14 Sep 27, 2011
Small Town America UGX wrote:
<quoted text>
Put another way, Putin fired him because he was at odds with putin's puppet, Medvedev.
Spot on :)

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