Mormons can finally say 'we got it wr...

Mormons can finally say 'we got it wrong' over black priest ban | Tresa Edmunds

There are 12 comments on the The Guardian story from Mar 6, 2013, titled Mormons can finally say 'we got it wrong' over black priest ban | Tresa Edmunds. In it, The Guardian reports that:

A new edition of the Latter Day Saints scriptures acknowledges that the ban overturned in 1978 was never proclaimed by God The musical Book of Mormon has a line 'In 1978 God changed his mind about black people.' Photograph: Joan Marcus/Associated Press The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints announced the publication of a new edition of the ... (more)

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Guardian.

Hotlanta

Atlanta, GA

#1 Mar 6, 2013
Well, this is nothing new. Most Blacks brought up Romney's being a member of the Mormon church, never realizing that Blacks had always been in the Mormon church from the time they arrived in Salt Lake City!

http://www.angelfire.com/mo2/blackmormon/blac...

Funny thing though, Black Baptist were just recently told they could now join the Southern Baptist Association less than five years ago!
Hotlanta

Atlanta, GA

#3 Mar 6, 2013
Blacks make no sense wrote:
<quoted text>
And O'bumbles once said that debating raising the debt ceiling showed "leadership failure".
The discussion is about the Mormon Church, not Obama.

Are you mentally capable to discuss a topic without attempting the deflect the subject at hand?

Well..........
Hotlanta

Atlanta, GA

#5 Mar 6, 2013
Blacks make no sense wrote:
<quoted text>
What "discussion"? There's one post about it.
Are you 'mentally capable to'(smh....)
define the multisyllabic words you use?
Well...???...
Oh, I am sorry Troll, on this episode you have rated within the bottom 2.5% of troll-speak. You have failed to make it to the next round, and must leave empty handed. You are the weakest link, Goodbye.

“Mystical Atheism for everyone!”

Since: Nov 08

El Cerrito California

#7 Mar 6, 2013
There were probably many other extremely racist statements made by the saints but Brigham Young probably holds the record.

Brigham Young comments about blacks
"You see some classes of the human family that are black, uncouth, uncomely, disagreeable and low in their habits, wild, and seemingly deprived of nearly all the blessings of the intelligence that is generally bestowed upon mankind....Cain slew his brother. Cain might have been killed, and that would have put a termination to that line of human beings. This was not to be, and the Lord put a mark upon him, which is the flat nose and black skin." (Journal of Discourses, vol. 7, p. 290).

"In our first settlement in Missouri, it was said by our enemies that we intended to tamper with the slaves, not that we had any idea of the kind, for such a thing never entered our minds. We knew that the children of Ham were to be the "servant of servants," and no power under heaven could hinder it, so long as the Lord would permit them to welter under the curse and those were known to be our religious views concerning them." (Journal of Discourses, vol. 2, p. 172).

"Shall I tell you the law of God in regard to the African race? If the white man who belongs to the chosen seed mixes his blood with the seed of Cain, the penalty, under the law of God, is death on the spot. This will always be so." (Journal of Discourses, vol. 10, p. 110).

death on the spot. The Mormon answer for everything.
the unknown

Germantown, TN

#8 Mar 6, 2013
mormons are a cult.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#9 Mar 7, 2013
I saw a Mormon almost rupture a vein in his pale neck when he imagined that his whiteness was being questioned.
Hotlanta

Atlanta, GA

#11 Mar 7, 2013
Blacks make no sense wrote:
<quoted text>You're the "troll", panda. You sit there having a "conversation",
... all by yourself.
Pardon me, but you've obviously mistaken me for someone who gives a damn.

Lili4

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#12 Mar 7, 2013
I don't understand why some black people become Mormon while knowing about this racist crap.
Hotlanta

Atlanta, GA

#13 Mar 7, 2013
Lili4 wrote:
I don't understand why some black people become Mormon while knowing about this racist crap.
And who started the "Baptist Church,the Chinese?

http://www.musefinds.com/AnAfroKinStore/Black...

" History of the Black Church
Black Churches During the colonial period, the Christianization of slaves
was erratic and generally ineffective until the 1740s.

Then evangelical revivals began to attract significant numbers of black converts,
largely because they enabled the lower classes,
including slaves, to pray and preach in public.

In the emotional fervor of the revival meetings
whites and blacks preached to and converted one another.

Baptists and Methodists licensed black men to preach, and by the 1770s some black ministers,
slave as well as free, were pastoring their own congregations.

Black churches in the South were subject to restrictions
intended to prevent unsupervised slave assemblies.

In the antebellum years, Christianity spread gradually among the slaves.

Some attended church with whites or under white supervision,
but the majority had little if any access to formal church services.

They developed a distinctive Christianity in which blacks figured as
God's chosen people awaiting their exodus from American bondage.

In the North, the abolition of slavery gave blacks more leeway to exercise their religious preferences.

Bethel's pastor, Richard Allen, and St. Thomas's pastor,
Absalom Jones, both former slaves, exercised civic leadership
in the black community in Philadelphia.

In 1816, the first major black denomination, the African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) church,
was formed under the leadership of Richard Allen.

Because the church was the only institution that African-Americans controlled,
it served as the primary forum for addressing their
social and political, as well as religious, needs.

And when the first National Negro Convention was organized in 1830,
it met at Bethel A.M.E. church in Philadelphia with Richard Allen presiding.

Black churches were overwhelmingly Protestant
because blacks had little contact with Roman Catholicism
outside of Maryland and Louisiana.

Some blacks did become Catholics, however,
and because other religious orders refused black candidates,

The first Americans to embark on foreign missions were
two Virginia-born black Baptists.

The A.M.E. church also established missions in Haiti and Canada.

During the Civil War, northern missionaries headed South
in the wake of the Union armies to organize schools and churches among the former slaves.

The increase in southern members enlarged the size of northern black
denominations and made them national in scope.

When Reconstruction opened electoral politics
to black participation, ministers took active roles,

Subsequently, violence and disfranchisement drove blacks
out of politics and relegated black leaders primarily to the church.

In the late nineteenth century, worsening race relations
prompted some black Americans to encourage large-scale emigration to Africa.

One of the most forceful proponents of emigration was A.M.E. bishop Henry McNeal Turner,
whose ordination of South African ministers contributed to
the development of an independent African church movement.

Black church membership at the end of the century
stood at 2.7 million out of a population of 8.3 million.

Baptists constituted the largest denomination.

In 1895, they formed the National Baptist Convention, Inc.,
which split into two branches twelve years later.

As time passed, new Holiness and Pentecostal churches disrupted older
black denominations by emphasizing doctrines of
sanctification and speaking in tongues.

A black preacher, William J. Seymour, led the 1906 Azusa Street Revival in
Los Angeles that gave rise to Pentecostal churches across the nation.

Esoteric versions of Judaism and Islam flourished,
asserting that Christianity was a religion exclusively for whites. "
Scholar86

Greenwood, MS

#14 Aug 19, 2013
Many people ,no matter their race, join the Mormon church because the Mormons give them money, help pay their bills, give relief,etc. Many people who are Mormons couldn't care less about the book of Mormon.

“Good day to you!”

Since: Oct 08

Earth

#15 Aug 19, 2013
Grandpasmurf952 wrote:
There were probably many other extremely racist statements made by the saints but Brigham Young probably holds the record.
Brigham Young comments about blacks
"You see some classes of the human family that are black, uncouth, uncomely, disagreeable and low in their habits, wild, and seemingly deprived of nearly all the blessings of the intelligence that is generally bestowed upon mankind....Cain slew his brother. Cain might have been killed, and that would have put a termination to that line of human beings. This was not to be, and the Lord put a mark upon him, which is the flat nose and black skin." (Journal of Discourses, vol. 7, p. 290).
"In our first settlement in Missouri, it was said by our enemies that we intended to tamper with the slaves, not that we had any idea of the kind, for such a thing never entered our minds. We knew that the children of Ham were to be the "servant of servants," and no power under heaven could hinder it, so long as the Lord would permit them to welter under the curse and those were known to be our religious views concerning them." (Journal of Discourses, vol. 2, p. 172).
"Shall I tell you the law of God in regard to the African race? If the white man who belongs to the chosen seed mixes his blood with the seed of Cain, the penalty, under the law of God, is death on the spot. This will always be so." (Journal of Discourses, vol. 10, p. 110).
death on the spot. The Mormon answer for everything.
This is an old post I didn't see of your's smurf. And are you kidding? Young holding the record for racists remarks? Fricking over 90% of white America from the east to the west coasts were fricking hard core naturally born and bred racist against any color but white. White America was keeping black America restricted in what they did from the foundation of America to the 60's.

“Good day to you!”

Since: Oct 08

Earth

#16 Aug 19, 2013
Scholar86 wrote:
Many people ,no matter their race, join the Mormon church because the Mormons give them money, help pay their bills, give relief,etc. Many people who are Mormons couldn't care less about the book of Mormon.
True. But becoming a Mormon to scarf the system isn't as easy today as it use to be. You want, you have to give as repayment of services rendered be it food or a check for a bill. You'll be expected to be at the building on Saturday's to help clean for several Saturday's in a row and to give assistance to setting up chairs etc for other church functions. Don't show and that bishop is obligated to remind them they still owe for services rendered. That's how that welfare system works and is more enforced now then in the past. If your given help, you're to give help back.

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